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76% Complete

81 Total Pages 58 Contributing Members

Cleofé Calderón - Brasil 1979, Amazonia #3

The sheer number of specimens agrostologist Cleofé Calderón collected for the Smithsonian, evidenced in this 1979 notebook, make it hard to believe that in just a few years, Calderón completely retired from botany. She remained in Washington after stepping away from the U.S. National Herbarium in 1985, but rarely returned to the Smithsonian, especially after her longtime professional partner Dr. Tom Soderstrom passed away in 1987. After breaking from the field, Calderón worked at a bibliographic service before retiring and returning to Argentina in 2005. Just two years later, she passed away. Your assistance in transcribing this project will ensure that Cleofé Calderón’s important work will not be forgotten. Calderón's handwriting can be a little difficult to read, so feel free to see how volunpeers have transcribed her work.

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63% Complete

297 Total Pages 33 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Field Offices, Offices of Staff Officers, Asst. Inspector General, Letters Received, Part 2

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the District of Columbia, Series 2.1: Offices of Staff Officers: Assistant Inspector General. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in the Washington, D.C. area during the Reconstruction Era.

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90% Complete

90 Total Pages 20 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Field Offices, Offices of Staff Officers, Asst. Inspector General, Unregistered Letters Received

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the District of Columbia, Series 2.1: Offices of Staff Officers: Assistant Inspector General. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in the Washington, D.C. area during the Reconstruction Era.

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51% Complete

211 Total Pages 24 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Field Offices, Offices of Staff Officers, Asst. Quartermaster, Letters Received, Entered in Vol. 1, Part 1

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the District of Columbia, Series 2.1: Offices of Staff Officers: Assistant Quartermaster and Disbursing Officer. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in the Washington, D.C. area during the Reconstruction Era.

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78% Complete

210 Total Pages 21 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Field Offices, Offices of Staff Officers, Asst. Quartermaster, Letters Received, Entered in Vol. 1, Part 2

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the District of Columbia, Series 2.1: Offices of Staff Officers: Assistant Quartermaster and Disbursing Officer. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in the Washington, D.C. area during the Reconstruction Era.

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38% Complete

226 Total Pages 129 Contributing Members

Friedrich "Fritz" Rumpf Notebooks - Set 2

Friedrich Karl Georg Rumpf (1888-1949) German illustrator and ethnographer, and son of German artist Fritz Rumpf. The younger Fritz Rumpf was living in Japan at the outbreak of war and likely composed parts of at least one of the following notebooks while living as a prisoner of war. PLEASE NOTE: The notebooks will be a special challenge as they contain multiple notes in German and Japanese, and drawings in pencil, ink and wash made during his travels and research in Japan.

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78% Complete

19 Total Pages 21 Contributing Members

Helen C. Rountree Lecture to Anthropological Society of Washington, 1988 October 18-19, Side 2, Helen C. Rountree Papers

This is part one of a lecture given to the Anthropological Society of Washington by Helen Rountree, who was a professor at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. Rountree studied the history of the Virginia Tribes from the 17th century to the 21st century and is considered a leading expert on Pocahontas. Please be aware that this audio recording is a bit difficult to hear given the poor audio quality. Do the best you can, and reach out anytime for help! Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

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50% Complete

14 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Interview with Michael Asher, March 1981 - Part 2

Jan Butterfield was an art writer and critic of contemporary art who spent most of her career in California. She is best known for her writings on late twentieth century installation and craft artists, particularly those who worked in California and the American West. In Jan Butterfield’s papers at the Archives of American Art, there are 107 sound tape reels, 97 cassettes, and 1 video reel of her interviews. Jan Butterfield conducted this interview with Michael Asher in March 1981.

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0% Complete

8 Total Pages 1 Contributing Members

Interview with Michael Asher, March 1981 - Part 3

Jan Butterfield was an art writer and critic of contemporary art who spent most of her career in California. She is best known for her writings on late twentieth century installation and craft artists, particularly those who worked in California and the American West. In Jan Butterfield’s papers at the Archives of American Art, there are 107 sound tape reels, 97 cassettes, and 1 video reel of her interviews. Jan Butterfield conducted this interview with Michael Asher in March 1981.

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96% Complete

82 Total Pages 25 Contributing Members

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, General Correspondence: Chadourne, Paul and Marc, 1929-1948

Letters from the General Correspondence subseries of the Jacques Seligmann & Co. records. The Jacques Seligmann & Co. records in the Archives of American Art are among the world's foremost resources for provenance research. The collection documents the business dealings of international art galleries which were active for nearly a century, and contains invaluable information for tracing the provenance of works of art which passed through the Jacques Seligmann & Company holdings.

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