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20% Complete

30 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Admiral Albert C. Read, USN (Curtiss NC-4) Collection - Cablegrams, Signals, and Dispatches

Rear Admiral Albert C. Read (1887-1967) graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1907 and became Naval Aviator #24 in July 1915. In 1919, Read was the commander of the Curtiss NC-4, the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic. The NC-4 covered 2150 nautical miles, from Nova Scotia to the Azores. The NC-4 was joined in the flight by the Curtiss NC-1 and Curtiss NC-3, but both the NC-1 and NC-3 were forced to land in the open sea.

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0% Complete

2 Total Pages 1 Contributing Members

Admiral Albert C. Read, USN (Curtiss NC-4) Collection - Correspondence, União de Agricultura Commercio e Industria

Rear Admiral Albert C. Read (1887-1967) graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1907 and became Naval Aviator #24 in July 1915. In 1919, Read was the commander of the Curtiss NC-4, the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic. The NC-4 covered 2150 nautical miles, from Nova Scotia to the Azores. The NC-4 was joined in the flight by the Curtiss NC-1 and Curtiss NC-3, but both the NC-1 and NC-3 were forced to land in the open sea.

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10% Complete

106 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Admiral Albert C. Read, USN (Curtiss NC-4) Collection - Log of NC-4 NC Seaplane Division One (Notebook, Transatlantic Flight)

Rear Admiral Albert C. Read (1887-1967) graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1907 and became Naval Aviator #24 in July 1915. In 1919, Read was the commander of the Curtiss NC-4, the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic. The NC-4 covered 2150 nautical miles, from Nova Scotia to the Azores. The NC-4 was joined in the flight by the Curtiss NC-1 and Curtiss NC-3, but both the NC-1 and NC-3 were forced to land in the open sea.

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5% Complete

38 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Admiral Albert C. Read, USN (Curtiss NC-4) Collection - Report of Transatlantic Flight of NC-4

Rear Admiral Albert C. Read (1887-1967) graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1907 and became Naval Aviator #24 in July 1915. In 1919, Read was the commander of the Curtiss NC-4, the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic. The NC-4 covered 2150 nautical miles, from Nova Scotia to the Azores. The NC-4 was joined in the flight by the Curtiss NC-1 and Curtiss NC-3, but both the NC-1 and NC-3 were forced to land in the open sea.

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28% Complete

76 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Admiral Albert C. Read, USN (Curtiss NC-4) Collection - Scrapbook

Rear Admiral Albert C. Read (1887-1967) graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1907 and became Naval Aviator #24 in July 1915. In 1919, Read was the commander of the Curtiss NC-4, the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic. The NC-4 covered 2150 nautical miles, from Nova Scotia to the Azores. The NC-4 was joined in the flight by the Curtiss NC-1 and Curtiss NC-3, but both the NC-1 and NC-3 were forced to land in the open sea.

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0% Complete

7 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

Artists Talk on Art Records: Panel Flyers, 1978

Artists Talk on Art is the art world's longest running and most prolific aesthetic panel discussion series organized by artists for artists. The still-active series is based in New York, New York and held at various locations around SoHo. Help us transcribe the key information on date, event name and participants listed in these promotional flyers which date from the 1970s through 2008.

Directions: Transcribe the following data from each event listed on the flyer:

  • Event Date: Transcribe in YYYY-MM-DD
  • Event Name: Transcribe as the name is listed on the flyer
  • Participants: Transcribe the participant names as "Last Name, First Name". Add the roles "moderator" or "organizer" in parentheses following first name when those roles are listed in the flyers. Separate names with a semicolon.

General guidance: Only transcribe flyer sections and pages which contain the required data. This may mean leaving some pages with no transcription at all. Do record event names or participants that are annotated or crossed out using normal Transcription Center formatting practices, i.e. [[crossed out]]Doe, Jane[[/crossed out]]. Transcribe typographical errors or misspellings as they appear with no corrections.

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83% Complete

6 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Artists Talk on Art Records: Panel Flyers, 1980

Artists Talk on Art is the art world's longest running and most prolific aesthetic panel discussion series organized by artists for artists. The still-active series is based in New York, New York and held at various locations around SoHo. Help us transcribe the key information on date, event name and participants listed in these promotional flyers which date from the 1970s through 2008.

Directions: Transcribe the following data from each event listed on the flyer:

  • Event Date: Transcribe in YYYY-MM-DD
  • Event Name: Transcribe as the name is listed on the flyer
  • Participants: Transcribe the participant names as "Last Name, First Name". Add the roles "moderator" or "organizer" in parentheses following first name when those roles are listed in the flyers. Separate names with a semicolon.

General guidance: Only transcribe flyer sections and pages which contain the required data. This may mean leaving some pages with no transcription at all. Do record event names or participants that are annotated or crossed out using normal Transcription Center formatting practices, i.e. [[crossed out]]Doe, Jane[[/crossed out]]. Transcribe typographical errors or misspellings as they appear with no corrections.

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0% Complete

2 Total Pages 0 Contributing Members

Artists Talk on Art Records: Pre-ATOA "Art Talks" Flyer, circa 1970s

Artists Talk on Art is the art world's longest running and most prolific aesthetic panel discussion series organized by artists for artists. The still-active series is based in New York, New York and held at various locations around SoHo. Help us transcribe the key information on date, event name and participants listed in these promotional flyers which date from the 1970s through 2008.

Directions: Transcribe the following data from each event listed on the flyer:

  • Event Date: Transcribe in YYYY-MM-DD
  • Event Name: Transcribe as the name is listed on the flyer
  • Participants: Transcribe the participant names as "Last Name, First Name". Add the roles "moderator" or "organizer" in parentheses following first name when those roles are listed in the flyers. Separate names with a semicolon.

General guidance: Only transcribe flyer sections and pages which contain the required data. This may mean leaving some pages with no transcription at all. Do record event names or participants that are annotated or crossed out using normal Transcription Center formatting practices, i.e. [[crossed out]]Doe, Jane[[/crossed out]]. Transcribe typographical errors or misspellings as they appear with no corrections.

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44% Complete

275 Total Pages 31 Contributing Members

Benjamin O. Davis Jr. Collection - Individual Flight Record - Davis, Benjamin O. 1206-A. (1)

Benjamin Oliver Davis, Jr. was born in Washington, DC on December 18, 1912. He attended Western Reserve University and the University of Chicago before gaining admission to the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY. He graduated in the Class of 1936 and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Infantry. After serving in the infantry for several years Davis was posted to the newly-established Tuskegee Army Air Field, AL for pilot training in 1942. He commanded the 99th Fighter Squadron, the first unit of “Tuskegee Airmen.” Two units of Tuskegee Airmen saw combat during World War II: the 99th Fighter Squadron and the 332d Fighter Group. Davis, promoted to Colonel in 1944, commanded both of these units in turn, leading the 99th and 332d in combat in Europe and earning the Air Medal, Distinguished Flying Cross, Legion of Merit, and Silver Star for his own actions and a Distinguished Unit Citation for the 332d Fighter Group. Davis was responsible for the success of the 477th, as he quickly brought the unit up to deployment requirements, in spite of racial tensions that had previously left the unit lacking training. The performance of the units under Davis' command had laid to rest questions regarding the abilities of the "negro race" and in 1948 the Air Force determined that the efficient use of its manpower required the integration of its units. As a result the Air Force rapidly complied with President Truman's order for the integration of the United States military. The integration procedure, however, resulted in the deactivation of Davis' command as its personnel were dispersed among the rest of the Air Force; Davis himself was assigned to attend classes at the Air War College at Maxwell AFB, AL. After completing the course of study at the Air War College, Davis was posted to a variety of command and staff positions both within the United States and abroad. Davis was promoted to Brigadier General in October 1954, after ten years as a Colonel. He was promoted to Major General in June 1959 and to Lieutenant General in April 1965. Despite persistent rumors of his impending promotion to full General, no such promotion was pending by the time of his retirement on January 31, 1970. On December 9, 1998, Davis was promoted to General on the Retired List, receiving his fourth star from President William Clinton in a ceremony held in the Presidential Hall of the Old Executive Office Building in Washington, DC. The promotion came only after the Tuskegee Airmen approached Senator John McCain of Arizona, who agreed that the promotion was warranted by Davis' service.

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25% Complete

155 Total Pages 26 Contributing Members

Benjamin O. Davis Jr. Collection - Individual Flight Record - Davis, Benjamin O. 1206-A. (2)

Benjamin Oliver Davis, Jr. was born in Washington, DC on December 18, 1912. He attended Western Reserve University and the University of Chicago before gaining admission to the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY. He graduated in the Class of 1936 and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Infantry. After serving in the infantry for several years Davis was posted to the newly-established Tuskegee Army Air Field, AL for pilot training in 1942. He commanded the 99th Fighter Squadron, the first unit of “Tuskegee Airmen.” Two units of Tuskegee Airmen saw combat during World War II: the 99th Fighter Squadron and the 332d Fighter Group. Davis, promoted to Colonel in 1944, commanded both of these units in turn, leading the 99th and 332d in combat in Europe and earning the Air Medal, Distinguished Flying Cross, Legion of Merit, and Silver Star for his own actions and a Distinguished Unit Citation for the 332d Fighter Group. Davis was responsible for the success of the 477th, as he quickly brought the unit up to deployment requirements, in spite of racial tensions that had previously left the unit lacking training. The performance of the units under Davis' command had laid to rest questions regarding the abilities of the "negro race" and in 1948 the Air Force determined that the efficient use of its manpower required the integration of its units. As a result the Air Force rapidly complied with President Truman's order for the integration of the United States military. The integration procedure, however, resulted in the deactivation of Davis' command as its personnel were dispersed among the rest of the Air Force; Davis himself was assigned to attend classes at the Air War College at Maxwell AFB, AL. After completing the course of study at the Air War College, Davis was posted to a variety of command and staff positions both within the United States and abroad. Davis was promoted to Brigadier General in October 1954, after ten years as a Colonel. He was promoted to Major General in June 1959 and to Lieutenant General in April 1965. Despite persistent rumors of his impending promotion to full General, no such promotion was pending by the time of his retirement on January 31, 1970. On December 9, 1998, Davis was promoted to General on the Retired List, receiving his fourth star from President William Clinton in a ceremony held in the Presidential Hall of the Old Executive Office Building in Washington, DC. The promotion came only after the Tuskegee Airmen approached Senator John McCain of Arizona, who agreed that the promotion was warranted by Davis' service.

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