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89% Complete

98 Total Pages 90 Contributing Members

Edward Alphonso Goldman - Mexico, August 31, 1897 - April 20, 1898

One of the hallmarks of our collecting scientists' records is their willingness and ability to use whatever comes to hand. This notebook of Edward Goldman's looks like it was probably meant to be used as an account book, with two columns on the right-hand side for credits and debits. Instead, it's been used for his personal journal. The pencil can be hard to read alongside the red ruled lines, but it's certain our volunpeers are up to task! Dig in and see what you can uncover from Goldman's notes.

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77% Complete

35 Total Pages 58 Contributing Members

Edward Alphonso Goldman - Mexico, mammal and bird notes, 1897-1898

So far, the journals of Edward Goldman that have been uploaded to the Transcription Center have been personal narrative journals of his travel with his mentor, Edward Nelson, in Mexico. This project, however, focuses on one of Goldman's scientific notebooks, where species are catalogued carefully with scientific names and physical descriptions. The earliest pages have lists of family and species names that also appear—maybe a memory aid, maybe a running list of what's been encountered? These lists appear in other journals, too. Dig in with your fellow volunpeers and see if you can determine what their function is!

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96% Complete

66 Total Pages 44 Contributing Members

Edward Alphonso Goldman - Mexico, mammal and bird notes, August - November 1896

One noteworthy characteristic of Edward Nelson's fieldwork is that he always consulted with locals in his collecting expeditions, learning from their expertise and adjusting his work accordingly. From Edward Goldman's journals, it's clear that he learned this from Nelson, too, along with the other critical skills of specimen collecting for the US Bureau of Biological Survey. It's intriguing to wonder about other ways that Nelson might have influenced the young Goldman—can you and your fellow volunpeers spot other likenesses between their work?

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80% Complete

45 Total Pages 51 Contributing Members

Edward Alphonso Goldman - Mexico, September 19 - November 28, 1896

It's easy to map our own ideas onto the past. Reading the records of Smithsonian collecting scientists, you might imagine them traveling with the comforts modern campers and backpackers enjoy—technical clothing, power-inflated air mattresses, waterproofed tents and shoes—but this wasn't the case. Edward Goldman was truly roughing it alongside his mentor, Edward Nelson, and both men sacrificed personal comforts to expand the United States' knowledge of the flora and fauna of North America. Turn the pages of Goldman's journal with your fellow volunpeers, as he deals with torrential rain in Mexico!

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96% Complete

28 Total Pages 105 Contributing Members

Faris and Yamna Naff Arab American Interviews- Zakem, Barakat, Abraham, Khoury and Cory, 1962 July (OT0003_02-000001)

PLEASE NOTE: MANY OF THESE RECORDINGS INCLUDE ARABIC LANGUAGE. WHEN APPROPRIATE, PLEASE TRANSCRIBE WHAT IS SPOKEN IN ARABIC. IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO TRANSCRIBE IN ARABIC PLEASE DO NOT MARK THE PAGE COMPLETE, SO THAT OTHER VOLUNTEERS MAY CONTINUE WORKING ON IT. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. Would you like to play a part in Arab American History; would you like to learn more about early Arab-America immigration? Help us transcribe these valuable Arab American oral history interviews. The Faris and Yamma Naff Arab American documents the immigration and assimilation of mostly Christian Syrian-Lebanese who came to America at the turn of the twentieth century. The immigrants were predominately-small land-owning peasants and artisans from the village of Syria and Lebanon. It was in these Syrian communities created by Arab immigrants that Dr. Naff sought interviews, photographs and personal papers.

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78% Complete

28 Total Pages 103 Contributing Members

Faris and Yamna Naff Arab American Interviews- Zakem, Barakat, Abraham, Khoury and Cory, 1962 July(OT0003_01-000001)

PLEASE NOTE: MANY OF THESE RECORDINGS INCLUDE ARABIC LANGUAGE. WHEN APPROPRIATE, PLEASE TRANSCRIBE WHAT IS SPOKEN IN ARABIC. IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO TRANSCRIBE IN ARABIC PLEASE DO NOT MARK THE PAGE COMPLETE, SO THAT OTHER VOLUNTEERS MAY CONTINUE WORKING ON IT. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. Would you like to play a part in Arab American History; would you like to learn more about early Arab-America immigration? Help us transcribe these valuable Arab American oral history interviews. The Faris and Yamma Naff Arab American documents the immigration and assimilation of mostly Christian Syrian-Lebanese who came to America at the turn of the twentieth century. The immigrants were predominately-small land-owning peasants and artisans from the village of Syria and Lebanon. It was in these Syrian communities created by Arab immigrants that Dr. Naff sought interviews, photographs and personal papers.

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75% Complete

28 Total Pages 114 Contributing Members

Faris and Yamna Naff Arab American Oral History Interviews- Nazha Haney; Thomas and Latefee Cory, 1962 July(OT0001_01-000002)

PLEASE NOTE: MANY OF THESE RECORDINGS INCLUDE ARABIC LANGUAGE. WHEN APPROPRIATE, PLEASE TRANSCRIBE WHAT IS SPOKEN IN ARABIC. IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO TRANSCRIBE IN ARABIC PLEASE DO NOT MARK THE PAGE COMPLETE, SO THAT OTHER VOLUNTEERS MAY CONTINUE WORKING ON IT. Would you like to play a part in Arab American History; would you like to learn more about early Arab-America immigration? Help us transcribe these valuable Arab American oral history interviews. The Faris and Yamma Naff Arab American documents the immigration and assimilation of mostly Christian Syrian-Lebanese who came to America at the turn of the twentieth century. The immigrants were predominately-small land-owning peasants and artisans from the village of Syria and Lebanon. It was in these Syrian communities created by Arab immigrants that Dr. Naff sought interviews, photographs and personal papers.

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78% Complete

261 Total Pages 145 Contributing Members

North Carolina Field Offices, Subordinate Field Offices: Newberne, Accounts Current, Abstracts, and Vouchers, Part 2

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the State of North Carolina, Series 4.30: Subordinate Field Offices: Newberne (Superintendent of the Eastern District). **Please note that the city’s name was spelled a variety of ways until it officially changed to New Bern in 1897. The majority of these records will have the name styled as “Newberne.” Additional resources including a list of Freedmen's Bureau staff in North Carolina are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era.

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52% Complete

25 Total Pages 37 Contributing Members

North Carolina Field Offices, Subordinate Field Offices: Newberne, Endorsements Sent and Received, Vol. 5 (173)

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the State of North Carolina, Series 4.30: Subordinate Field Offices: Newberne (Superintendent of the Eastern District). **Please note that the city’s name was spelled a variety of ways until it officially changed to New Bern in 1897. The majority of these records will have the name styled as “Newberne.” Additional resources including a list of Freedmen's Bureau staff in North Carolina are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era.

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70% Complete

186 Total Pages 145 Contributing Members

North Carolina Field Offices, Subordinate Field Offices: Newberne, Letters Received, A–W, 1867, Part 1

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the State of North Carolina, Series 4.30: Subordinate Field Offices: Newberne (Superintendent of the Eastern District). **Please note that the city’s name was spelled a variety of ways until it officially changed to New Bern in 1897. The majority of these records will have the name styled as “Newberne.” Additional resources including a list of Freedmen's Bureau staff in North Carolina are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era.

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