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80% Complete

5 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Apollo 11 Launch Director's Loop (Reel 1 of 3), July 10 and 16, 1969

Join us in celebrating the 50th anniversary of the launch of Apollo 11 by transcribing sound recordings from the landmark event. Part of the National Air and Space Museum's Archives' United States Space Program Oral History Collection [Kapp], this set of recordings related to the Apollo 11 mission include crew press conferences, loops of audio from the launch director, the flight director, and the Public Affairs Office, and the reaction to the moon landing in the press room of the Manned Spaceflight Center in Houston, Texas. Every TC Sound segment transcribed helps make the history of Apollo 11 and the U.S. Space Program more accessible. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning and please **NOTE** many of these recordings are difficult to hear and contain multiple interruptions and silences.

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4% Complete

21 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Apollo 11 Launch Director's Loop (Reel 2 of 3), Side A, July 16, 1969

Join us in celebrating the 50th anniversary of the launch of Apollo 11 by transcribing sound recordings from the landmark event. Part of the National Air and Space Museum's Archives' United States Space Program Oral History Collection [Kapp], this set of recordings related to the Apollo 11 mission include crew press conferences, loops of audio from the launch director, the flight director, and the Public Affairs Office, and the reaction to the moon landing in the press room of the Manned Spaceflight Center in Houston, Texas. Every TC Sound segment transcribed helps make the history of Apollo 11 and the U.S. Space Program more accessible. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning and please **NOTE** many of these recordings are difficult to hear and contain multiple interruptions and silences.

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14% Complete

21 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Apollo 11 Launch Director's Loop (Reel 2 of 3), Side B, July 16, 1969

Join us in celebrating the 50th anniversary of the launch of Apollo 11 by transcribing sound recordings from the landmark event. Part of the National Air and Space Museum's Archives' United States Space Program Oral History Collection [Kapp], this set of recordings related to the Apollo 11 mission include crew press conferences, loops of audio from the launch director, the flight director, and the Public Affairs Office, and the reaction to the moon landing in the press room of the Manned Spaceflight Center in Houston, Texas. Every TC Sound segment transcribed helps make the history of Apollo 11 and the U.S. Space Program more accessible. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning and please **NOTE** many of these recordings are difficult to hear and contain multiple interruptions and silences.

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0% Complete

29 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Apollo 11 Launch Director's Loop (Reel 3 of 3), July 16, 1969

Join us in celebrating the 50th anniversary of the launch of Apollo 11 by transcribing sound recordings from the landmark event. Part of the National Air and Space Museum's Archives' United States Space Program Oral History Collection [Kapp], this set of recordings related to the Apollo 11 mission include crew press conferences, loops of audio from the launch director, the flight director, and the Public Affairs Office, and the reaction to the moon landing in the press room of the Manned Spaceflight Center in Houston, Texas. Every TC Sound segment transcribed helps make the history of Apollo 11 and the U.S. Space Program more accessible. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning and please **NOTE** many of these recordings are difficult to hear and contain multiple interruptions and silences.

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35% Complete

67 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Bailey - British Columbia, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, July - October 1911

Over a 10 week period in the late summer and early fall of 1911, Vernon Orlando Bailey (1864-1942) observed wildlife and collected specimens in western Canada and the Intermountain West region of the United States. The Bureau of Biological Survey's chief field naturalist's diary-like field notes include travel details, daily activities, terrain and descriptions of the communities he visited as he worked in places like the Big Hole Mountains, the Caribou Mountains and Yellowstone National Park. Join in with other volunpeers and help us to transcribe this set of Bailey's field notes. Your efforts help us to augment biodiversity research resources in places like the Biodiversity Heritage Library.

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18% Complete

95 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Bailey - New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, August - November 1906

Imagine your ideal work environment, what would it look like? For Chief Field Naturalist, Vernon Orlando Bailey (1864-1942) of the United States Bureau, it was the great outdoors. Bailey kept regular notes of the flora and fauna around him whether on assignment in the field, at home or somewhere in between. On this collecting trip, Bailey's chronological notes capture this data along with more about his interactions with colleagues, the camps he used and daily activities as he worked through New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas. Join us and a team of volunpeers to transcribe this field book and make it more accessible to researchers around the world.

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20% Complete

10 Total Pages 20 Contributing Members

Behind the Apron Project: Mary Dawkins Interview, 1997

Behind the Apron oral history project documents the experiences of Black oyster and clam workers in Southern Maryland. The interviews explore issues such as: the connection between land and water, between farming and the fishing industry; the communal spirit and camaraderie amongst oyster workers; the experience of women oyster workers; and the changes in the oyster packing industry resulting in a diminished African American workforce. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

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18% Complete

11 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

Behind the Apron Project: William Bourne Interview, April 15, 1997

Behind the Apron oral history project documents the experiences of Black oyster and clam workers in Southern Maryland. The interviews explore issues such as: the connection between land and water, between farming and the fishing industry; the communal spirit and camaraderie amongst oyster workers; the experience of women oyster workers; and the changes in the oyster packing industry resulting in a diminished African American workforce. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

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87% Complete

54 Total Pages 32 Contributing Members

Benjamin O. Davis Jr. Collection - Newsclippings (12/5)

Benjamin Oliver Davis, Jr. was born in Washington, DC on December 18, 1912. He attended Western Reserve University and the University of Chicago before gaining admission to the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY. He graduated in the Class of 1936 and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Infantry. After serving in the infantry for several years Davis was posted to the newly-established Tuskegee Army Air Field, AL for pilot training in 1942. He commanded the 99th Fighter Squadron, the first unit of “Tuskegee Airmen.” Two units of Tuskegee Airmen saw combat during World War II: the 99th Fighter Squadron and the 332d Fighter Group. Davis, promoted to Colonel in 1944, commanded both of these units in turn, leading the 99th and 332d in combat in Europe and earning the Air Medal, Distinguished Flying Cross, Legion of Merit, and Silver Star for his own actions and a Distinguished Unit Citation for the 332d Fighter Group. Davis was responsible for the success of the 477th, as he quickly brought the unit up to deployment requirements, in spite of racial tensions that had previously left the unit lacking training. The performance of the units under Davis' command had laid to rest questions regarding the abilities of the "negro race" and in 1948 the Air Force determined that the efficient use of its manpower required the integration of its units. As a result the Air Force rapidly complied with President Truman's order for the integration of the United States military. The integration procedure, however, resulted in the deactivation of Davis' command as its personnel were dispersed among the rest of the Air Force; Davis himself was assigned to attend classes at the Air War College at Maxwell AFB, AL. After completing the course of study at the Air War College, Davis was posted to a variety of command and staff positions both within the United States and abroad. Davis was promoted to Brigadier General in October 1954, after ten years as a Colonel. He was promoted to Major General in June 1959 and to Lieutenant General in April 1965. Despite persistent rumors of his impending promotion to full General, no such promotion was pending by the time of his retirement on January 31, 1970. On December 9, 1998, Davis was promoted to General on the Retired List, receiving his fourth star from President William Clinton in a ceremony held in the Presidential Hall of the Old Executive Office Building in Washington, DC. The promotion came only after the Tuskegee Airmen approached Senator John McCain of Arizona, who agreed that the promotion was warranted by Davis' service.

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30% Complete

81 Total Pages 40 Contributing Members

Cleofé Calderón - Brasil 1979, Amazonia #3

The sheer number of specimens agrostologist Cleofé Calderón collected for the Smithsonian, evidenced in this 1979 notebook, make it hard to believe that in just a few years, Calderón completely retired from botany. She remained in Washington after stepping away from the U.S. National Herbarium in 1985, but rarely returned to the Smithsonian, especially after her longtime professional partner Dr. Tom Soderstrom passed away in 1987. After breaking from the field, Calderón worked at a bibliographic service before retiring and returning to Argentina in 2005. Just two years later, she passed away. Your assistance in transcribing this project will ensure that Cleofé Calderón’s important work will not be forgotten. Calderón's handwriting can be a little difficult to read, so feel free to see how volunpeers have transcribed her work.

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