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80% Complete

226 Total Pages 345 Contributing Members

Friedrich "Fritz" Rumpf Notebooks - Set 2

Friedrich Karl Georg Rumpf (1888-1949) German illustrator and ethnographer, and son of German artist Fritz Rumpf. The younger Fritz Rumpf was living in Japan at the outbreak of war and likely composed parts of at least one of the following notebooks while living as a prisoner of war. PLEASE NOTE: The notebooks will be a special challenge as they contain multiple notes in German and Japanese, and drawings in pencil, ink and wash made during his travels and research in Japan.

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74% Complete

242 Total Pages 100 Contributing Members

Georgia Education, Letters Sent, Volume 3 (42), Mar. 24–July 27, 1869, Part 1

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Superintendent of Education for the State of Georgia, Series 1: Letters Sent. PLEASE NOTE: Many of the documents in this set of records are hard to read and some are totally illegible. Please transcribe what you are able and note [[illegible]] for any portions that you cannot decipher. Additional resources are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the lives of formerly enslaved men and women in Georgia during the Reconstruction Era.

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75% Complete

242 Total Pages 91 Contributing Members

Georgia Education, Letters Sent, Volume 3 (42), Mar. 24–July 27, 1869, Part 2

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Superintendent of Education for the State of Georgia, Series 1: Letters Sent. PLEASE NOTE: Many of the documents in this set of records are hard to read and some are totally illegible. Please transcribe what you are able and note [[illegible]] for any portions that you cannot decipher. Additional resources are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the lives of formerly enslaved men and women in Georgia during the Reconstruction Era.

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57% Complete

240 Total Pages 94 Contributing Members

Georgia Education, Letters Sent, Volume 3 (42), Mar. 24–July 27, 1869, Part 3

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Superintendent of Education for the State of Georgia, Series 1: Letters Sent. PLEASE NOTE: Many of the documents in this set of records are hard to read and some are totally illegible. Please transcribe what you are able and note [[illegible]] for any portions that you cannot decipher. Additional resources are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the lives of formerly enslaved men and women in Georgia during the Reconstruction Era.

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97% Complete

694 Total Pages 297 Contributing Members

Letters from Paris: American Artists in Paris, 1860-1930

In the mid- to late 1800s and early 1900s, many Americans traveled to Paris, France, to further their careers, and artists were no exception! American portraitists, realists, impressionists, and abstract artists all studied, lived, and worked in Paris, France during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Many of them wrote letters back home to family and friends describing their lives there, whether it was studio visits, copying the masters at the Louvre, or their military service during World War I. Transcribe the letters of thirteen of these artists and their families and friends, and travel with them to the small world of expatriate American artists in Paris, circa 1860-1930.

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61% Complete

105 Total Pages 96 Contributing Members

Mississippi Assistant Commissioner, Orders and Circulars, General Orders and Circulars Issued, June 1865–Dec. 1868

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for Mississippi, Series 5: Orders and Circulars. Additional resources including a list of Freedmen's Bureau staff in Mississippi and a style sheet for help when transcribing Mississippi records are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in Mississippi during the Reconstruction Era.

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99% Complete

318 Total Pages 101 Contributing Members

Mississippi Assistant Commissioner, Station Book, Oaths, and Rosters, Oaths of Office, 1865–1868, Part 1

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for Mississippi, Series 7: Station Book, Oaths, and Rosters. Additional resources including a list of Freedmen's Bureau staff in Mississippi and a style sheet for help when transcribing Mississippi records are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in Mississippi during the Reconstruction Era.

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