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3% Complete

228 Total Pages 16 Contributing Members

Georgia Assistant Commissioner, Letters Sent, Volume 5 (15), Oct. 10, 1866–Feb. 4, 1867, Part 2

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for Georgia, Series 1: Letters Sent. PLEASE NOTE: Press copies were made by moistening a piece of thin paper and pressing it on the original letter through the use of a press copying machine, which transferred some of the ink to the moistened paper. Because of the relative crudeness of this method, many of the press copies are difficult to read and some are virtually illegible. Please mark any illegible text as [[illegible]]. Additional resources are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the lives of formerly enslaved men and women in Georgia during the Reconstruction Era.

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22% Complete

229 Total Pages 41 Contributing Members

Project PHaEDRA - Evelyn F. Leland - Miscellaneous Observations - Variables M5 #5

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian), women computers studied glass plate photographs of the night sky. Here they catalogued stars, identifying variables, interpreting stellar spectra, counting galaxies, and measuring the vast distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest. You can sign up for our Project PHaEDRA newsletter here. Have questions? Want to start a discussion? Head over to our blog posts to make comments about notebooks and ask questions. NOTE: Please follow these special instructions when transcribing these notebooks.

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12% Complete

227 Total Pages 24 Contributing Members

Georgia Assistant Commissioner, Letters Sent, Volume 5 (15), Oct. 10, 1866–Feb. 4, 1867, Part 1

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for Georgia, Series 1: Letters Sent. PLEASE NOTE: Press copies were made by moistening a piece of thin paper and pressing it on the original letter through the use of a press copying machine, which transferred some of the ink to the moistened paper. Because of the relative crudeness of this method, many of the press copies are difficult to read and some are virtually illegible. Please mark any illegible text as [[illegible]]. Additional resources are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the lives of formerly enslaved men and women in Georgia during the Reconstruction Era.

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64% Complete

228 Total Pages 235 Contributing Members

Project PHaEDRA - Williamina P. Fleming - Measurments of Spectrum Plates, Southern Draper Catalogue #61

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian), women computers studied glass plate photographs of the night sky. Here they catalogued stars, identifying variables, interpreting stellar spectra, counting galaxies, and measuring the vast distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. In these books, follow the work of Williamina Fleming who discovered over 310 variable stars as well as discovering the first white dwarf. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest. You can sign up for our Project PHaEDRA newsletter here. Have questions? Want to start a discussion? Head over to our blog posts to make comments about notebooks and ask questions about transcribing. NOTE: Please follow these special instructions when transcribing these notebooks.

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40% Complete

258 Total Pages 79 Contributing Members

Georgia Assistant Commissioner, Registers of Reports Received From Subordinate Officers, Volume 1 (8), Mar.–Sept. 1867

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for Georgia, Series 7: Registers of Reports Received From Subordinate Officers. Additional resources are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the lives of formerly enslaved men and women in Georgia during the Reconstruction Era.

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25% Complete

12 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: "Four Indian Kings" portraits

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face,” NPG director Martin Sullivan discusses portraits from the exhibition "Four Indian Kings." The paintings for this special installation were lent by the Portrait Gallery of Canada, a program of the Library and Archives of Canada. In 1710, a delegation of four Native American leaders--three Mohawk from the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) alliance and one Mohican from the Algonquin nations--traveled to the Court of Queen Anne in London. The delegation traveled to London with British military leaders seeking to court support against competing French and their allied Native interests in North America. To commemorate the delegates' visit, Queen Anne commissioned John Verelst, a Dutch portrait artist residing in London, to paint their official portraits. They are the earliest known surviving oil portraits from life of Native people of North America. So popular were the "Four Indian Kings" that printmaker John Simon created mezzotints after these paintings. While the "Four Kings," as they became known, were not the first Native visitors to Britain, their presence at Court and their interactions with Londoners, who treated them as celebrities, ignited the British imagination. Poems, ballads, and music were written about them. View the online exhibition at: http://npg.si.edu/exhibit/kings/slideshow/kings.htm. Recorded at NPG, November 6, 2008. Image info: Sa Ga Yeath Qua Pieth Tow, King of the Maquas, lifedates unknown / John Verelst (c. 1675-1734) / Oil on canvas, 1710 / Library and Archives Canada / Acquired with a special grant from the Canadian Government, 1977. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. ["Four Indian Kings" oil paintings by John Verelst. 1977-35-1, 1977-35-2, 1977-35-3, & 1977-35-4. Series of mezzotint on paper prints by John Simon copy after John Verelst. NPG.74.22, NPG.74.23, NPG.74.24 & NPG.92.149]

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73% Complete

232 Total Pages 129 Contributing Members

Project PHaEDRA - Evelyn F. Leland - Observing Book #56

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian), women computers studied glass plate photographs of the night sky. Here they catalogued stars, identifying variables, interpreting stellar spectra, counting galaxies, and measuring the vast distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest. You can sign up for our Project PHaEDRA newsletter here. Have questions? Want to start a discussion? Head over to our blog posts to make comments about notebooks and ask questions. NOTE: Please follow these special instructions when transcribing these notebooks.

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96% Complete

439 Total Pages 247 Contributing Members

2018 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: ARMENIA AUDIO LOG SHEETS

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed "class style" notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content.

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20% Complete

288 Total Pages 100 Contributing Members

Georgia Assistant Commissioner, Registers of Reports Received From Subordinate Officers, Volume 2 (9), Sept. 1867–May 1868

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for Georgia, Series 7: Registers of Reports Received From Subordinate Officers. Additional resources are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the lives of formerly enslaved men and women in Georgia during the Reconstruction Era.

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73% Complete

232 Total Pages 296 Contributing Members

Project PHaEDRA - Williamina P. Fleming - Measurement of Spectrum Plates for Southern Draper Catalogue #51

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian), women computers studied glass plate photographs of the night sky. Here they catalogued stars, identifying variables, interpreting stellar spectra, counting galaxies, and measuring the vast distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. In these books, follow the work of Williamina Fleming who discovered over 310 variable stars as well as discovering the first white dwarf. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest. You can sign up for our Project PHaEDRA newsletter here. Have questions? Want to start a discussion? Head over to our blog posts to make comments about notebooks and ask questions about transcribing. NOTE: Please follow these special instructions when transcribing these notebooks.

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