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7 Total Pages 1 Contributing Members

USNM Curators Annual Report - Department of Reptiles: Annual Report, 1881

The handwriting in this brief report from Lt. C. Yarrow to the United States National Museum Assistant Director G. Brown Goode is a bit challenging to read. The last two pages are written in a different hand altogether. Your contributions to this transcription help make this report and those that will follow more accessible to researchers, citizen scientists and people all over the world.

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3% Complete

260 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

Proceedings of the Board of Regents Meeting held on January 24, 1983

With a long tradition of encouraging aviation, how would the Smithsonian recognize the very first circumnavigation of the world by helicopter just months earlier in 1982? Help us transcribe these proceedings of the Board of Regents and catch up with the progress on Quadrangle construction and the interest in developing the space underneath the National Mall. A five-year prospectus is also attached.

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16% Complete

217 Total Pages 13 Contributing Members

Alice Cunningham Fletcher Papers- Fletcher to La Flesche Box: 5A, 1911

Alice Cunningham Fletcher (1838-1923), was an ethnologist and collaborator with the Peabody Museum of Harvard, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. A pioneer in a field dominated by men, she was one of the first female ethnologists to conduct fieldwork among the Omaha, Nez Perce, Winnebago and Sioux Indian tribes. Fletcher worked closely with Francis La Flesche, an Omaha Indian and fellow ethnologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. Because of their close personal and professional relationship, much of their research materials and correspondence are housed together in the National Anthropological Archives.

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21% Complete

194 Total Pages 26 Contributing Members

Alice Cunningham Fletcher Papers- Winnebago allotment recordbook Box: 4B, 1887-89

Alice Cunningham Fletcher (1838-1923), was an ethnologist and collaborator with the Peabody Museum of Harvard, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. A pioneer in a field dominated by men, she was one of the first female ethnologists to conduct fieldwork among the Omaha, Nez Perce, Winnebago and Sioux Indian tribes. Fletcher worked closely with Francis La Flesche, an Omaha Indian and fellow ethnologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. Because of their close personal and professional relationship, much of their research materials and correspondence are housed together in the National Anthropological Archives.

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29% Complete

288 Total Pages 15 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Education, Registered Letters Received, Entered in Register 1, C-F, Jan. 1868-Dec. 1869, Part 2

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Superintendent of Education for the District of Columbia, Series 5: Registered Letters Received. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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30% Complete

226 Total Pages 95 Contributing Members

Friedrich "Fritz" Rumpf Notebooks - Set 2

Friedrich Karl Georg Rumpf (1888-1949) German illustrator and ethnographer, and son of German artist Fritz Rumpf. The younger Fritz Rumpf was living in Japan at the outbreak of war and likely composed parts of at least one of the following notebooks while living as a prisoner of war. PLEASE NOTE: The notebooks will be a special challenge as they contain multiple notes in German and Japanese, and drawings in pencil, ink and wash made during his travels and research in Japan.

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35% Complete

131 Total Pages 23 Contributing Members

Alice Cunningham Fletcher Papers- Fletcher to La Flesche Box: 5A, 1895, 1899, 1905

Alice Cunningham Fletcher (1838-1923), was an ethnologist and collaborator with the Peabody Museum of Harvard, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. A pioneer in a field dominated by men, she was one of the first female ethnologists to conduct fieldwork among the Omaha, Nez Perce, Winnebago and Sioux Indian tribes. Fletcher worked closely with Francis La Flesche, an Omaha Indian and fellow ethnologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. Because of their close personal and professional relationship, much of their research materials and correspondence are housed together in the National Anthropological Archives.

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38% Complete

26 Total Pages 18 Contributing Members

The Crisis Soldier's issue

The Crisis is the official magazine of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Founded by W. E. B. Du Bois (editor), Oswald Garrison Villard, J. Max Barber, Charles Edward Russell, Kelly Miller, W. S. Braithwaite, and Mary Dunlop Maclean, The Crisis has been in continuous print since 1910, making it the oldest African American-led publication in the world. The June 1918 “Soldier’s Issue” focuses on African Americans fighting in World War I. Help us transcribe the ads, articles, and images in The Crisis and learn about the experiences of African American soldiers, the opinions of African American thought leaders, and the effects on African American lives during World War I.

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40% Complete

290 Total Pages 29 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Education, Registered Letters Received, Entered in Register 1, C-F, Jan. 1868-Dec. 1869, Part 1

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Superintendent of Education for the District of Columbia, Series 5: Registered Letters Received. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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41% Complete

99 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Yamada Diary

Help us transcribe this WWII Japanese diary. At the end of World War II, an unknown United States Marine brought home several Japanese-language items. These items were subsequently sold and the purchaser's son later donated them to the National Air and Space Museum. In 2003 and 2004, Museum volunteers, Mr. Koji Hayama and Mr. Tom Momiyama, translated parts of the material and they believe that they were created by a Mr. Yamada, who was probably part of an aircraft ground crew with occasional flight duties, and served in Manchuria, Korea, Burma, and the Philippines. Transcriptions of this diary will help National Air and Space Museum curators as they begin research for new exhibits. Please note that this diary is written in Japanese, and requires access to a Japanese keyboard, and basic knowledge of the language, for transcription. NASM staff are also interested in any translations that can be provided of the diary's contents. Please separate any translations by including them below the transcriptions for each page, and by indicating the translation with brackets. For example: [[translation]] text here [[/translation]]. Please reach out with any questions.

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