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500 Total Pages 1 Contributing Members

STRI Pollen Cards (Set 30)

The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute - Center for Tropical Paleoecology and Archaeology invites you to help transcribe specimen cards for the pollen collection. Each of these cards corresponds to a pollen grain on a microscope slide; the data on the cards are invaluable to researchers. Learn how to transcribe these cards with these instructions. Thank you for your help in transcribing them.

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4 Total Pages 15 Contributing Members

The Liberator, Vol. XXIII, No. 7

The Liberator (1831-1865) was the most widely circulated anti-slavery newspaper during the antebellum period and throughout the Civil War. It was published and edited in Boston by William Lloyd Garrison, a leading white abolitionist and founder of the influential American Anti-Slavery Society. Over the three decades of its publication, The Liberator denounced all people and acts that would prolong slavery including the United States Constitution. Garrison’s condemnation of the Constitution was an incredibly controversial and eventually led to a split with Frederick Douglass. Once referred to as the most aggressive and outspoken abolitionist the world-over, Garrison was decades ahead of most other northern white abolitionists in demanding the immediate emancipation of all people held in bondage and the restoration of the natural rights of enslaved persons. Garrison’s nature attracted him followers, lovingly called “Garrisonians,” but also many more detractors. Throughout his tenure as editor of The Liberator, his vitriolic criticisms of all people and institutions he saw as responsible for slavery gained him many threats and attempts against his life, including a $5000 (now valued at over $150,000) bounty on his head in Georgia. Garrison’s abolitionism, as well as his support of women’s rights for equality, were driven by the moral imperative to ensure that all people would truly be equal. The Liberator, whose readership was predominantly free blacks in the northern states, officially ended its run in 1865 when the Civil War ended. At the close of the paper’s run, Garrison declared, “my vocation as an abolitionist is ended.” He then turned his attention to women’s suffrage, pacifism, and condemning the post-Reconstruction actions of southern states against blacks. Help us to transcribe these issues of The Liberator and commemorate one of the major forces in the cause for abolition.

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4 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

The Liberator, Vol. XXIV, No. 7

The Liberator (1831-1865) was the most widely circulated anti-slavery newspaper during the antebellum period and throughout the Civil War. It was published and edited in Boston by William Lloyd Garrison, a leading white abolitionist and founder of the influential American Anti-Slavery Society. Over the three decades of its publication, The Liberator denounced all people and acts that would prolong slavery including the United States Constitution. Garrison’s condemnation of the Constitution was an incredibly controversial and eventually led to a split with Frederick Douglass. Once referred to as the most aggressive and outspoken abolitionist the world-over, Garrison was decades ahead of most other northern white abolitionists in demanding the immediate emancipation of all people held in bondage and the restoration of the natural rights of enslaved persons. Garrison’s nature attracted him followers, lovingly called “Garrisonians,” but also many more detractors. Throughout his tenure as editor of The Liberator, his vitriolic criticisms of all people and institutions he saw as responsible for slavery gained him many threats and attempts against his life, including a $5000 (now valued at over $150,000) bounty on his head in Georgia. Garrison’s abolitionism, as well as his support of women’s rights for equality, were driven by the moral imperative to ensure that all people would truly be equal. The Liberator, whose readership was predominantly free blacks in the northern states, officially ended its run in 1865 when the Civil War ended. At the close of the paper’s run, Garrison declared, “my vocation as an abolitionist is ended.” He then turned his attention to women’s suffrage, pacifism, and condemning the post-Reconstruction actions of southern states against blacks. Help us to transcribe these issues of The Liberator and commemorate one of the major forces in the cause for abolition.

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182 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

Yin-Hsü Trip, 1928-1929

Li Chi was a prominent Chinese archaeologist, trained in the United States and one of the first Chinese archaeologists to conduct and teach scientific archaeology in China. This collection contains the manuscripts of the reports Li Chi prepared for the Freer Gallery when he was a member of the archaeological expeditions in China sponsored by the Freer Gallery of Art and headed by Carl Whiting Bishop during the years 1926 to 1929.

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500 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

STRI Pollen Cards (Set 29)

The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute - Center for Tropical Paleoecology and Archaeology invites you to help transcribe specimen cards for the pollen collection. Each of these cards corresponds to a pollen grain on a microscope slide; the data on the cards are invaluable to researchers. Learn how to transcribe these cards with these instructions. Thank you for your help in transcribing them.

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255 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Paleobiology Marine Invertebrates Project (Set 2)

Please join us to transcribe the labels of Fossil Marine Invertebrates with Department of Paleobiology. Learn how to transcribe this project and get started. NOTE: Please do not delete notes left by other volunteers, as these are important for the Paleobiology and TC teams to improve the project workflow; instead, please add additional comments below existing comments, as necessary. Thank you!

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174 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Scurlock Studio Session Register 1911-1922

Addison Scurlock and his sons spent much of the twentieth century photographing leaders, luminaries, and local Washingtonians. From the original Scurlock Studio on U Street to the Custom Craft Studio and the Capitol School of Photography, the Scurlocks' imagery was viewed and shared by thousands of people. Help the Archives Center at the National Museum of Natural History create more understanding of their practice by transcribing these ledgers which include client numbers and names arranged in broadly alphabetic order.

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260 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Edmund Heller - Handwritten China journal, Vol. 3 of 5

Continue the adventure through China with zoologist Edmund Heller by helping transcribe the third of his five-volume set of field notes! Heller, who worked as a naturalist on Smithsonian-led expeditions for over a decade, took these notes while on expedition through China and Burma in 1917. Learn more about Heller’s journey and join other digital volunteers in transcribing!

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500 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Other Fascinating Euphorb Genera Set 13

Join us in transcribing the Euphorbiaceae, or Spurge family, an extensive flowering family. In this group, we find plants from the genus Chamaesyce.

Please contact Laura Tancredi, Department of Botany, or tweet us at @TranscribeSI for any questions or comments about the transcriptions.

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3% Complete

111 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

Harvard-Smithsonian Women Computers Project - Henrietta Swan Leavitt #03

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), women studied over 130 years of the night sky, all preserved on glass plate photographs. Women computers catalogued stars, identified variables, interpreted stellar spectra, counted galaxies, and measured distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest. To learn more about the impact of the women computers, listen to an interview with Dava Sobel about her recently released book "Glass Universe" describing their legacy.

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