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"Factory Girl's Song"

This broadside contains the lyrics to “The Factory Girl’s Song,” a folk song whose origins date back at least to the 1830s. The song’s nineteen 4-line stanzas describe the daily work of the mill girls in different jobs: spinning, weaving, and dressing the finished cloth. At the end the singer tells of returning home to marry, giving up the rigors of tending the machinery and working for harsh overseers. The song may have originated in Lowell, Massachusetts, but some scholars suggest that the reference to wages earned in “shillings” instead of dollars may mean it had connections to Canadian immigrants to the Lowell textile mills. Several iterations of the song are known, including “The Lowell Factory Girl”, “The Factory Girl’s Come-All-Ye” from Lewiston, Maine, and generalized versions titled “Factory Girl.” Help transcribe this song as part of the Smithsonian's #BecauseOfHerStory campaign to share and celebrate the diverse stories of American girlhood. Coordination of this and other girlhood history projects in the Transcription Center (including selection, digitization, cataloging, outreach, and educational resources) was funded by the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative. Click here to learn more.

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4 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

"Fifty Years To-day" by Solomon G. Brown

"Fifty Years To-day" is a poem written by Solomon G. Brown commemorating his 50 years of continual service at the Smithsonian Institution. Brown, the first African American employee of the Smithsonian and quite likely the first Smithsonian employee to complete 50 years of service, had served under the first three Secretaries of the Smithsonian. A ceremony was held on February 15th, 1902, honoring Brown. The poem was published in a pamphlet made possible by "contributions of his friends at the Smithsonian Institution" in 1903.

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5 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

"Keeping the Nation in Good Shape," Maidenform, Inc., Maidenform Collection

A thriving brassiere company created in 1922, Maidenform Inc. offered a new type of undergarment for women that enhanced, rather than downplayed, a woman's natural figure. Maidenform advertising campaigns were enormously successful, and generated controversy as well as praise. The now famous "I Dreamed" campaign was launched in 1949; this campaign ran for 20 years, making it one of the longest running campaigns in the history of advertising. The advertisements featured models in everyday or fantastic situations, elaborately costumed but wearing only a Maidenform bra above the waist. This campaign was followed by the "Maidenform Woman" campaign which was credited with boosting sales by 200 percent in some stores. This booklet & other company records, including advertisements and reports, reveals information about the history of the brassiere industry and female-centered marketing campaigns. Help transcribe this material as part of the Smithsonian's #BecauseOfHerStory campaign to share and celebrate the diverse stories of American girlhood. Coordination of this and other girlhood history projects in the Transcription Center (including selection, digitization, cataloging, outreach, and educational resources) was funded by the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative. Click here to learn more.

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13 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

"Life with Teena: A Seventeen Magazine Survey of Subscribers and their Mothers, Vol. 1," Estelle Ellis Collection

Publishing, advertising, and marketing pioneer, Estelle Ellis was among the first to focus on the American female demographic, especially teens and working-class women. Condé Nast Publications, Incorporated, Carter Hawley Hale-owned department stores, Phillips-Van Heusen, Dow Chemical, and the Kimberly-Clark Corporation were among her clients. This advertisement and other materials from Ellis's professional papers reveal information about the history of female-centered marketing campaigns, publications, and the advertising industry. Help transcribe this material as part of the Smithsonian's #BecauseOfHerStory campaign to share and celebrate the diverse stories of American girlhood. Coordination of this and other girlhood history projects in the Transcription Center (including selection, digitization, cataloging, outreach, and educational resources) was funded by the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative. Click here to learn more.

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1 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

"Maiden-Forum Newsletter: Thirty Years of Progress," Jan. - Dec., 1952, Maidenform Collection

A thriving brassiere company created in 1922, Maidenform Inc. offered a new type of undergarment for women that enhanced, rather than downplayed, a woman's natural figure. Maidenform advertising campaigns were enormously successful, and generated controversy as well as praise. The now famous "I Dreamed" campaign was launched in 1949; this campaign ran for 20 years, making it one of the longest running campaigns in the history of advertising. The advertisements featured models in everyday or fantastic situations, elaborately costumed but wearing only a Maidenform bra above the waist. This campaign was followed by the "Maidenform Woman" campaign which was credited with boosting sales by 200 percent in some stores. This article & other company records, including advertisements and reports, reveals information about the history of the brassiere industry and female-centered marketing campaigns. Help transcribe this material as part of the Smithsonian's #BecauseOfHerStory campaign to share and celebrate the diverse stories of American girlhood. Coordination of this and other girlhood history projects in the Transcription Center (including selection, digitization, cataloging, outreach, and educational resources) was funded by the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative. Click here to learn more.

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2 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

"Seventeen: A Unique Case Study," 1945 April 15, Estelle Ellis Collection

Publishing, advertising, and marketing pioneer, Estelle Ellis was among the first to focus on the American female demographic, especially teens and working-class women. Condé Nast Publications, Incorporated, Carter Hawley Hale-owned department stores, Phillips-Van Heusen, Dow Chemical, and the Kimberly-Clark Corporation were among her clients. This advertisement and other materials from Ellis's professional papers reveal information about the history of female-centered marketing campaigns, publications, and the advertising industry. Help transcribe this material as part of the Smithsonian's #BecauseOfHerStory campaign to share and celebrate the diverse stories of American girlhood. Coordination of this and other girlhood history projects in the Transcription Center (including selection, digitization, cataloging, outreach, and educational resources) was funded by the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative. Click here to learn more.

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166 Total Pages 48 Contributing Members

"The 1931 Wildcat" - Wiley College Yearbook

Help us transcribe this 1931 edition of HBCU Wiley College’s yearbook, “The Wildcat” and get to know the faculty and students while learning about the types of clubs and organizations they participated in. Among these students was Henrietta Bell Wells, the first female member of the Wiley College debate team and a member of the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. Bell Wells made history by participating in the first college debate between white and African American students in 1930. This yearbook belonged to her. The Wiley College debate team defeated some of the top teams in the country and won a national title in 1935.

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56 Total Pages 21 Contributing Members

115th Anniversary of the First African Baptist Church and the 8th Anniversary of our Pastor Rev. Y. B. Williams and the Dedicati

The First African Baptist Church, Richmond, was founded in 1841 in Richmond, Virginia. After the Civil War, the church became one of the largest in America. This pamphlet honors the dedication of a new church building and helps to celebrate 115 years of the church’s founding. Learn about the history of one of the oldest African American churches in America by transcribing this anniversary program.

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203 Total Pages 54 Contributing Members

1897 Mining Journal, Vulcan and Buck Mountain Collieries

Have you ever wondered what it was like to run at a coal mine? This 1897 journal will give you a firsthand view of what coal mining was like at the end of the nineteenth century. Kept by an unnamed clerk or manager, the journal's entries provide a daily record of the events in and around two Pennsylvania anthracite collieries, the Buck Mountain Colliery (operational from about 1884 to 1930) and the Vulcan Colliery (operational from about 1883 to 1913). (A "colliery" refers to a coal mine and all of the equipment and facilities that surround it).

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26 Total Pages 18 Contributing Members

1928 European Travel Diary of Marion Spencer Hall

Have you ever wondered what it would have been like to travel across Europe in the early 20th century? You can travel with Marion Spencer Hall, daughter of Joseph Underwood Hall, as she writes about her journey in her 1928 diary, by helping us transcribe this journal.

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