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17 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

"Business Possibilities with United States Army...." by A. Roy Knabenshue

The A. Roy Knabenshue Collection contains approximately three and a half cubic feet of material relating to the life and career of a daring aeronaut and the United States' first successful dirigible pilot. The collection includes correspondence, photographic material, drawings of aircraft, and flight records. The material spans over seventy years, from the end of the nineteenth century to the nineteen-sixties.

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102 Total Pages 38 Contributing Members

"Chauffeur of the Skies" by A. Roy Knabenshue, pages 1-100

The A. Roy Knabenshue Collection contains approximately three and a half cubic feet of material relating to the life and career of a daring aeronaut and the United States' first successful dirigible pilot. The collection includes correspondence, photographic material, drawings of aircraft, and flight records. The material spans over seventy years, from the end of the nineteenth century to the nineteen-sixties.

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105 Total Pages 65 Contributing Members

"Chauffeur of the Skies" by A. Roy Knabenshue, pages 101-201

The A. Roy Knabenshue Collection contains approximately three and a half cubic feet of material relating to the life and career of a daring aeronaut and the United States' first successful dirigible pilot. The collection includes correspondence, photographic material, drawings of aircraft, and flight records. The material spans over seventy years, from the end of the nineteenth century to the nineteen-sixties.

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44 Total Pages 13 Contributing Members

"Compliments of Roy Knabenshue" Souvenir Booklet

The A. Roy Knabenshue Collection contains approximately three and a half cubic feet of material relating to the life and career of a daring aeronaut and the United States' first successful dirigible pilot. The collection includes correspondence, photographic material, drawings of aircraft, and flight records. The material spans over seventy years, from the end of the nineteenth century to the nineteen-sixties.

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1 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

"Factory Girl's Song"

This broadside contains the lyrics to “The Factory Girl’s Song,” a folk song whose origins date back at least to the 1830s. The song’s nineteen 4-line stanzas describe the daily work of the mill girls in different jobs: spinning, weaving, and dressing the finished cloth. At the end the singer tells of returning home to marry, giving up the rigors of tending the machinery and working for harsh overseers. The song may have originated in Lowell, Massachusetts, but some scholars suggest that the reference to wages earned in “shillings” instead of dollars may mean it had connections to Canadian immigrants to the Lowell textile mills. Several iterations of the song are known, including “The Lowell Factory Girl”, “The Factory Girl’s Come-All-Ye” from Lewiston, Maine, and generalized versions titled “Factory Girl.” Help transcribe this song as part of the Smithsonian's #BecauseOfHerStory campaign to share and celebrate the diverse stories of American girlhood. Coordination of this and other girlhood history projects in the Transcription Center (including selection, digitization, cataloging, outreach, and educational resources) was funded by the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative. Click here to learn more.

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4 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

"Fifty Years To-day" by Solomon G. Brown

"Fifty Years To-day" is a poem written by Solomon G. Brown commemorating his 50 years of continual service at the Smithsonian Institution. Brown, the first African American employee of the Smithsonian and quite likely the first Smithsonian employee to complete 50 years of service, had served under the first three Secretaries of the Smithsonian. A ceremony was held on February 15th, 1902, honoring Brown. The poem was published in a pamphlet made possible by "contributions of his friends at the Smithsonian Institution" in 1903.

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1 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

"Let Freedom Ring, Let Democracy Prevail" sketch

Issues with race and racial equity have a long history in the United States (US) and so do interracial organizations forming to combat discriminatory practices and demand social justice for all Americans. The story of the Institute on Race Relations, founded by Tomlinson D. Todd (1910 – 1987), is an example of a substantive but understudied history of collaborative anti-racist activism in the District of Columbia. The organization’s aim was to combat segregation and discrimination in the Nation’s Capital through activism and the “Americans All” radio program. Help us transcribe these records, and discover how this interracial organization addressed segregation and worked to end discriminatory practices in Washington, DC.

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13 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

"Life with Teena: A Seventeen Magazine Survey of Subscribers and their Mothers, Vol. 1," Estelle Ellis Collection

Publishing, advertising, and marketing pioneer, Estelle Ellis was among the first to focus on the American female demographic, especially teens and working-class women. Condé Nast Publications, Incorporated, Carter Hawley Hale-owned department stores, Phillips-Van Heusen, Dow Chemical, and the Kimberly-Clark Corporation were among her clients. This advertisement and other materials from Ellis's professional papers reveal information about the history of female-centered marketing campaigns, publications, and the advertising industry. Help transcribe this material as part of the Smithsonian's #BecauseOfHerStory campaign to share and celebrate the diverse stories of American girlhood. Coordination of this and other girlhood history projects in the Transcription Center (including selection, digitization, cataloging, outreach, and educational resources) was funded by the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative. Click here to learn more.

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202 Total Pages 51 Contributing Members

"Lyrics of Love and Laughter" by Paul Laurence Dunbar

Paul Laurence Dunbar was a renowned poet, author, and playwright. In 1903 he published a collection of poems titled Lyrics of Love and Laughter. Written after a separation from his wife, a nervous breakdown, and a bout with pneumonia, this book of poems contains both “sentimental and somberly realistic expressions and depictions of black life.” Help us transcribe the more than 100 poems featured in this compilation and see how Dunbar used both dialect and standard English verse in his poetry.

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1 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

"Maiden-Forum Newsletter: Thirty Years of Progress," Jan. - Dec., 1952, Maidenform Collection

A thriving brassiere company created in 1922, Maidenform Inc. offered a new type of undergarment for women that enhanced, rather than downplayed, a woman's natural figure. Maidenform advertising campaigns were enormously successful, and generated controversy as well as praise. The now famous "I Dreamed" campaign was launched in 1949; this campaign ran for 20 years, making it one of the longest running campaigns in the history of advertising. The advertisements featured models in everyday or fantastic situations, elaborately costumed but wearing only a Maidenform bra above the waist. This campaign was followed by the "Maidenform Woman" campaign which was credited with boosting sales by 200 percent in some stores. This article & other company records, including advertisements and reports, reveals information about the history of the brassiere industry and female-centered marketing campaigns. Help transcribe this material as part of the Smithsonian's #BecauseOfHerStory campaign to share and celebrate the diverse stories of American girlhood. Coordination of this and other girlhood history projects in the Transcription Center (including selection, digitization, cataloging, outreach, and educational resources) was funded by the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative. Click here to learn more.

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