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1981 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: OJIBWA CULTURE AUDIO LOG SHEETS

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed "class style" notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. At the 1981 Festival, Ojibwa participants demonstrated the construction of the wigwam, canoe, and food vessels made of bark. More information about the program including participant names can be found here.

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39 Total Pages 37 Contributing Members

1981 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: SOUTH SLAVIC AMERICANS AUDIO LOG SHEETS

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed "class style" notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. Like other ethnic or immigrant communities in the United States, South Slavs (Slovenes, Croats, Serbs, and Macedonians of Yugoslavia as well as Bulgarians) cherish, nurture, and thoroughly enjoy the musical traditions of their homeland. At the 1981 Festival, music and dance ensembles from Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Illinois, Ohio, and Wisconsin brought Balkan and South Slavic traditions to life, drawing Festival visitors onto the dance floor to join the fun. More information about the program including participant names can be found here.

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37 Total Pages 35 Contributing Members

1982 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: CHILDREN'S PROGRAM AUDIO LOG SHEETS

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed "class style" notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. In 1982, the Children's Program sought to provide a child-centered perspective on the Festival's two major programs, Korea and Oklahoma, with its own dedicated participants among the contingents of Oklahomans and Korean Americans. Visitors to the Children's Area could experience what it was like to grow up in the Oklahoma Territory and could discover the values and traditions that Korean Americans have handed down to their children. More information about the program including participant names can be found here.

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134 Total Pages 105 Contributing Members

1982 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: KOREA AUDIO LOG SHEETS

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed “class style” notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. This program celebrated the centenary of diplomatic relations between the United States and Korea, and the equally-long relations between the Smithsonian and Korean scholars. Many of the kinds of traditions the first Smithsonian researchers encountered a century earlier were represented at the 1982 Festival, including musical instrument making, musical performance, pottery making and rituals from the indigenous shamanic religion of Korea. Visitors could also enjoy other venerable traditions including masked dance drama, hemp-cloth and hat making, and the occupational songs of farmers and women divers. Korean Americans presented traditions brought from Korea that have taken root in the American land. More information about the program including participant names can be found in the finding aid here.

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160 Total Pages 95 Contributing Members

1982 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: NATIONAL HERITAGE FELLOWSHIPS AUDIO LOG SHEETS

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed "class style" notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. On July 3, 1982, the Festival hosted a ceremony awarding the first annual National Heritage Fellowships. These honors, organized and funded by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), were awarded to traditional musicians and craftspersons who have made outstanding contributions to the cultural life of our nation. Complementing the award ceremony, the Festival presented a series of daily tribute concerts to demonstrate respect and esteem for the talent, vision, and application of the recipients. In addition, an exhibition of crafts by Fellows was shown in the National Museum of American History through August 1982. More information about the program including participant names can be found here.

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201 Total Pages 87 Contributing Members

1982 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: OKLAHOMA AUDIO LOG SHEETS

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed "class style" notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. The 75th anniversary of the State of Oklahoma's admission to the Unites States - its Diamond Jubilee - was celebrated at the 1982 Festival with the presentation of cultural traditions that Oklahomans nourish and support. Music and craft traditions associated with diverse ethnic groups in Oklahoma were presented, as well as skills, knowledge, and lore associated with two major Oklahoma institutions - horses and oil. Indeed, a horse-racing track and show ring were created in the center of the National Mall to host programs spotlighting Oklahoma horse culture. More information about the program including participant names can be found here.

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64 Total Pages 55 Contributing Members

1983 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: FESTIVAL SAMPLER AUDIO LOG SHEETS

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed "class style" notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. In 1983, the Festival featured an auxiliary music stage called the "Festival Sampler" stage. It included performances from the French/French American and New Jersey programs. A small additional group of musicians from the greater Washington, D.C. area were included in these programs featuring blues and Afro Caribbean music. This series also includes documentation of evening concerts held at the Sylvan Theater on the grounds of the Washington Monument, as well as music performed at the Participant Reception on June 28, 1983. More information about the program including participant names can be found here.

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281 Total Pages 179 Contributing Members

1983 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: FRENCH/FRENCH AMERICAN PROGRAM AUDIO LOG SHEETS

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed "class style" notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. The year 1983 marked the 200th anniversary of the Treaty of Paris, which was ratified in Princeton, New Jersey, and which formally marked the end of the American Revolutionary War. The Festival accordingly brought together a potpourri of traditions from France and from French-speaking communities of the United States, with presentations of music and dance, crafts and foodways. French Canadian folk song, as maintained today in New England, represents an oral heritage that originally played a crucial role in the everyday life of the rural Quebecois, centering around the activities of the parish, family and neighbors. Traditional foodways play an integral role in French American life, especially in the Cajun and Creole communities of French Louisiana and the Quebecois and Acadian communities of New England. Lately, a return to Afro French Creole identity has paralleled the general renaissance of Louisiana French culture. More information about the program including participant names can be found here.

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188 Total Pages 91 Contributing Members

1983 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: NEW JERSEY AUDIO LOG SHEETS

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed "class style" notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. The 1983 Festival program brought a panoply of presentations from New Jersey to the National Mall, ranging from ethnic celebrations of African Americans, Japanese Americans, Italian Americans and others to craft demonstrations featuring skills and techniques of silk weaving, herbalism and glassblowing, and on to the diverse occupations associated with maritime trades and the sacred songs of menhaden fishermen. New Jersey is populated by a large number of ethnic groups, many of which have clustered in city neighborhoods. There is a Cuban community in Union City, a Portuguese community in Newark, a Hungarian community in New Brunswick, and a Japanese community in rural Seabrook Farms. For many ethnic groups folk traditions are their symbols of identity. Their ethnicity is expressed in foodways, language, music, dance, and festivals (often in ethnic costume). More information about the program including participant names can be found here.

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256 Total Pages 109 Contributing Members

1984 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: ALASKA AUDIO LOG SHEETS

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed "class style" notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. The 1984 Festival offered visitors the opportunity to encounter the varied traditions of Alaska, with a sizable contingent of Alaska Natives, a glacier transported to the National Mall, and the chance to see its natural bounty - especially fish - transformed into delicious meals. More information about the program including participant names can be found here.

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