Browse Projects

Prevnext

100% Complete

55 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

USNM CURATORS ANNUAL REPORTS - Department of Ethnology, Semi-Annual and Monthly Reports, 1885-1886

The 1884 World's Fair, held in New Orleans, covered over 200 acres worth of land and featured a U.S. Government and State Exhibits Hall. What role did the Smithsonian's Department of Ethnology play in this event? Read more on the Smithsonian's contributions to the World's Fair in this set of 1886 curator's reports, and join other digital volunteers in transcribing it!

Go

100% Complete

20 Total Pages 18 Contributing Members

USNM Curators Annual Reports - Department of Fishes: 1895-1896

In the early years of the United States National Museum, specimens and collection objects were acquired at a remarkable rate. Now almost twenty years later, the Department of Fishes was experiencing a bit of a slow down, as curator Barton A. Bean notes in the curators annual report to Assistant Secretary Dr. G. Brown Goode. However, museum work is always a balance of activity and this report describes the highlights of the department's efforts. It is a good thing reports are submitted annually as there seems to be a discrepancy in the overall number of fish specimens in the Department's collections according to Executive Curator F. W. True. Join other volunteers in transcribing this handwritten report to increase its usefulness to future researchers.

Go

100% Complete

67 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

USNM Curators Annual Reports - Department of Fishes: Annual Report, 1886 - 1887

From 1878 to 1905, researcher and curator Dr. Tarleton Hoffman Bean of Smithsonian’s Department of Fishes documented species of fish collected from around the world and the research performed with these collections. According to his review of reports in 1886, the United States government's deep-sea explorations to that date had yielded more new forms of fish than any other government. In 1887, he personally investigated the mackerel fishing industry's activities in the Atlantic Ocean, spending over a month at sea observing the fleet activity. The Boston Herald published three of his letters describing the experience that spring. Please help us transcribe Dr. Bean's account of the work done with the Smithsonian's Fishes collections and learn what else transpired in fiscal year 1887.

Go

100% Complete

57 Total Pages 13 Contributing Members

USNM Curators Annual Reports - Department of Mammals, 1885

What is it like to build a collection for a new museum? What is its role when targeted hunts are threatening populations of wolf and fox? This report filed by the Department of Mammals head curator just 8 years after the United States National Museum opened its doors explores these questions amidst more administrative details. Join other volunteers in transcribing this report and gain some insight into the state of animal affairs in the late 1880's.

Go

100% Complete

98 Total Pages 18 Contributing Members

USNM Curators Annual Reports - Department of Mammals, 1885-1886

If you visit the National Museum of Natural History today, you might see a variety of taxidermied species on display. What creatures might you have encountered on a visit over 130 years ago? Learn what was on display at the United States National Museum with this annual curator’s report from the Department of Mammals, 1885-86. The report details the condition of the mammal collection, including what specimens were on view, and which had been added or replaced. Join other digital volunteers in transcribing this unique look into the history of the Smithsonian!

Go

100% Complete

41 Total Pages 16 Contributing Members

USNM Curators Annual Reports - Department of Mammals, 1886 - 1887

What is a day like for the United States National Museum’s curator for the Department of Mammals? What happens behind-the-scenes to build a collection or a new exhibition? Learn more from F. W. True, the curator of the department, who gives a review of the 1886-87 activities, from new accessions to new floor cases. Then, help transcribe this pieces of Smithsonian history!

Go

100% Complete

33 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

USNM Curators Annual Reports - Department of Mammals, 1887-1888

In 1887, curator Frederick W. True and the Department of Mammals staff was busy preparing for the upcoming Cincinnati Centennial Exposition of the Ohio Valley and Central States. One hundred and thirty years later, this exhibition became the key in solving an archival mystery. Learn more about the exhibition (and how it connects to a previously unidentified bison painting in our collection) with this 1887-88 annual curator’s report. Then, help us transcribe—it could help solve future collections questions!

Go

100% Complete

24 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

USNM Curators Annual Reports - Department of Mammals, 1888-1889

In 1888, curator for the U.S. National Museum’s Department of Mammals Frederick W. True described the department as receiving “more important additions than, perhaps, during any other year.” What types of specimen were added to the museum’s collection? How did they come to the Smithsonian? Find out with this set of annual curator’s reports—and join in on transcribing!

Go

100% Complete

87 Total Pages 15 Contributing Members

USNM Curators Annual Reports - Department of Mammals, 1889-1890

"The accessions of the year were of more than ordinary interest. Among the exotic mammals ..." So starts curator Frederick W. True's annual report from the Department of Mammals. What was an "exotic" mammal in the 1890's? This report includes species from Mt. Kilimanjaro and Angola, describes arrangements to trade collections with museums overseas and more. Still the year was not without its minor hurdles. Please join us in transcribing this to make the contents more accessible to today's researchers and historians.

Go

100% Complete

38 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

USNM Curators Annual Reports - Department of Mammals, 1890-1891

A good year in a growing museum can mean many different things: valuable new accessions, research discoveries, new exhibits, more visitors and so on. However, the tally at the end of the year does little to reveal the challenges experienced throughout the year, challenges that made the year-end results so significant. Curator Frederick W. True had the responsibility of summing up the accomplishments of the Department of Mammals in 1891 for the Director of the United States National Museum. Please help us transcribe his report.

Go

Pages