Browse Projects

next

100% Complete

1 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

"Factory Girl's Song"

This broadside contains the lyrics to “The Factory Girl’s Song,” a folk song whose origins date back at least to the 1830s. The song’s nineteen 4-line stanzas describe the daily work of the mill girls in different jobs: spinning, weaving, and dressing the finished cloth. At the end the singer tells of returning home to marry, giving up the rigors of tending the machinery and working for harsh overseers. The song may have originated in Lowell, Massachusetts, but some scholars suggest that the reference to wages earned in “shillings” instead of dollars may mean it had connections to Canadian immigrants to the Lowell textile mills. Several iterations of the song are known, including “The Lowell Factory Girl”, “The Factory Girl’s Come-All-Ye” from Lewiston, Maine, and generalized versions titled “Factory Girl.” Help transcribe this song as part of the Smithsonian's #BecauseOfHerStory campaign to share and celebrate the diverse stories of American girlhood. Coordination of this and other girlhood history projects in the Transcription Center (including selection, digitization, cataloging, outreach, and educational resources) was funded by the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative. Click here to learn more.

Go

100% Complete

13 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

"Life with Teena: A Seventeen Magazine Survey of Subscribers and their Mothers, Vol. 1," Estelle Ellis Collection

Publishing, advertising, and marketing pioneer, Estelle Ellis was among the first to focus on the American female demographic, especially teens and working-class women. Condé Nast Publications, Incorporated, Carter Hawley Hale-owned department stores, Phillips-Van Heusen, Dow Chemical, and the Kimberly-Clark Corporation were among her clients. This advertisement and other materials from Ellis's professional papers reveal information about the history of female-centered marketing campaigns, publications, and the advertising industry. Help transcribe this material as part of the Smithsonian's #BecauseOfHerStory campaign to share and celebrate the diverse stories of American girlhood. Coordination of this and other girlhood history projects in the Transcription Center (including selection, digitization, cataloging, outreach, and educational resources) was funded by the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative. Click here to learn more.

Go

100% Complete

1 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

"Maiden-Forum Newsletter: Thirty Years of Progress," Jan. - Dec., 1952, Maidenform Collection

A thriving brassiere company created in 1922, Maidenform Inc. offered a new type of undergarment for women that enhanced, rather than downplayed, a woman's natural figure. Maidenform advertising campaigns were enormously successful, and generated controversy as well as praise. The now famous "I Dreamed" campaign was launched in 1949; this campaign ran for 20 years, making it one of the longest running campaigns in the history of advertising. The advertisements featured models in everyday or fantastic situations, elaborately costumed but wearing only a Maidenform bra above the waist. This campaign was followed by the "Maidenform Woman" campaign which was credited with boosting sales by 200 percent in some stores. This article & other company records, including advertisements and reports, reveals information about the history of the brassiere industry and female-centered marketing campaigns. Help transcribe this material as part of the Smithsonian's #BecauseOfHerStory campaign to share and celebrate the diverse stories of American girlhood. Coordination of this and other girlhood history projects in the Transcription Center (including selection, digitization, cataloging, outreach, and educational resources) was funded by the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative. Click here to learn more.

Go

100% Complete

2 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

"Seventeen: A Unique Case Study," 1945 April 15, Estelle Ellis Collection

Publishing, advertising, and marketing pioneer, Estelle Ellis was among the first to focus on the American female demographic, especially teens and working-class women. Condé Nast Publications, Incorporated, Carter Hawley Hale-owned department stores, Phillips-Van Heusen, Dow Chemical, and the Kimberly-Clark Corporation were among her clients. This advertisement and other materials from Ellis's professional papers reveal information about the history of female-centered marketing campaigns, publications, and the advertising industry._ Help transcribe this material as part of the Smithsonian's #BecauseOfHerStory campaign to share and celebrate the diverse stories of American girlhood. Coordination of this and other girlhood history projects in the Transcription Center (including selection, digitization, cataloging, outreach, and educational resources) was funded by the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative. Click here to learn more.

Go

100% Complete

166 Total Pages 48 Contributing Members

"The 1931 Wildcat" - Wiley College Yearbook

Help us transcribe this 1931 edition of HBCU Wiley College’s yearbook, “The Wildcat” and get to know the faculty and students while learning about the types of clubs and organizations they participated in. Among these students was Henrietta Bell Wells, the first female member of the Wiley College debate team and a member of the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. Bell Wells made history by participating in the first college debate between white and African American students in 1930. This yearbook belonged to her. The Wiley College debate team defeated some of the top teams in the country and won a national title in 1935.

Go

100% Complete

309 Total Pages 34 Contributing Members

“The Girl Graduate – Her Own Book”

Transcribe “The Girl Graduate – Her Own Book” and help us to learn more about Marjorie P. Collins. Collins assembled this scrapbook commemorating her time at Prairie View College (now Prairie View A&M University) in Prairie View, Texas. In 1925, Collins graduated from Prairie View and was elected to become a teacher at the Almeda Road Junior High School, in Houston, Texas. She also worked closely with the National Council of Negro Women. Beyond those facts, we know very little about Collins. With your help, perhaps we can discover more about Collins within in the 190 pages of newspaper clippings, photographs, hand-written entries, printed programs, ribbons, and correspondence relating to her life.

Go

100% Complete

40 Total Pages 24 Contributing Members

#1757-#1975, Mary Agnes Chase expedition to Brazil, 1924-1925

Islands, Aqueducts, Bamboo, and Oxen – what will you discover through the annotated photographs of Mary Agnes Chase's expedition to Brazil in 1924-1925? Help us transcribe the set to learn more.

Go

100% Complete

26 Total Pages 25 Contributing Members

1928 European Travel Diary of Marion Spencer Hall

Have you ever wondered what it would have been like to travel across Europe in the early 20th century? You can travel with Marion Spencer Hall, daughter of Joseph Underwood Hall, as she writes about her journey in her 1928 diary, by helping us transcribe this journal.

Go

100% Complete

40 Total Pages 47 Contributing Members

1943 Rohwer Center High School Yearbook

This 1943 Rohwer Center High School Yearbook belonged to Mitsuye Ito. Ito and her family were among the many Japanese Americans who were forcibly removed from their homes and business on the west coast and incarcerated in relocation camps during World War II. The yearbook was made by the staff, who wrote in the foreword of the book that they hoped students would have pleasant memories of school and remember their theme, the Mississippi River, as a symbol of life and perpetual forward motion. They also reminded the students that they were important to the Nation. The yearbook is signed by numerous students and teachers. Rohwer Center High School was located at the Rohwer Relocation Center in Desha County, Arkansas. This camp was one of the two incarceration camps built in Arkansas to house Japanese Americans from the West Coast. The camp was active from September 18, 1942, to November 30, 1945. The yearbook is in fragile condition and no longer has its cover. Help us transcribe this yearbook and make this important history more accessible.

Go

100% Complete

69 Total Pages 23 Contributing Members

1981 Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Deaf Folklore Audio Log Sheets

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed “class style” notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. For Folklore of the Deaf program material, some logs contain information not spoken through the public address system but were in fact signed and interpreted to the visitors in the audience.

Go

Pages