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32 Total Pages 152 Contributing Members

Lilly Martin Spencer Papers, Correspondence, 1846-1849

New York and Ohio painter Lilly Martin Spencer (1822-1902) was known for her popular portrait paintings and humorous domestic genre scenes. Help transcribe correspondence from her papers, including letter from Edward D. Mansfield regarding exhibition of Spencer's paintings; and an exchange between Nicholas Longworth and S. P Hildreth regarding exhibiting Spencer's paintings in Cincinnati.

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54 Total Pages 80 Contributing Members

Lucielle Belmont, Balloonist and Parachutist Scrapbook

Lucielle Belmont Baldwin Rutshaw (1887--1961) was a balloonist and parachutist who performed solo balloon ascensions and parachute drops as an entertainer at county fairs and exhibitions all over the United States and Canada in the years from 1912 to the early 1920s. Belmont was sometimes billed as part of the "Famous Belmont Sisters" with sisters Mabel and Cleo, and was managed for at least part of her career by Robinson Attractions in Chicago, Illinois. Belmont was known for triple and sometimes quadruple jumps where she cut loose from one parachute then opened another one multiple times. After her marriage to C. C. Baldwin, Belmont sometimes appeared as Lucielle Belmont Baldwin and under this name she was granted License for Flying Civilian Aircraft no. 375 (to operate a hot air balloon) on April 9, 1918 by the Joint Army and Navy Board on Aeronautic Cognizance. Since she made her first solo balloon ascent, including a parachute jump, on August 14, 1912, Lucielle qualified for membership in the Early Birds of Aviation and she joined that organization with her married name from her second marriage, Lucielle Rutshaw. Note: Belmont's first name, Lucielle, is frequently misspelled throughout this scrapbook. Please transcribe all text exactly as it appears in the original document, and [[Lucielle]] may be included after misspelled instances of her name to improve searchability. Please do not describe the images, photographs, or maps that appear in this project. We are only seeking transcriptions.

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4 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Lucile Q. Mann - Oral History, Front Matter

You may have helped us transcribe some of Lucile Mann and her husband, National Zoological Park director William Mann's diaries or field notes from Fiji, South America and Africa as part of William's work. As we release her oral history to the Transcription Center, this information will provide biographical information you might find helpful. Join other volunteers in transcribing the personal interviews of Lucile and learn more about the adventures she had throughout her life.

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56 Total Pages 18 Contributing Members

Lucile Q. Mann - Oral History, Session 1, 1897-1940

Have you ever wondered what you'd do if you ran the zoo? Learn the ins and outs of running the National Zoological Park with Lucile Q. Mann's incredible oral history. Lucile and her husband William Mann, National Zoological Park Director, traveled the world to bring animals back to Washington, D.C.. They raised baby animals in their own home, and published about their adventures in The National Geographic Magazine. In this first of six interviews, Lucile reflects on her early career as an editor for the U. S. Department of Agriculture's Bureau of Entomology, on her marriage to William, and life at the Zoo during the Great Depression. Learn more about the Manns' adventures together with other volunteers transcribing this fascinating oral history interview!

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48 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Lucile Q. Mann - Oral History, Session 2

How might you describe highlights of your life? In Lucile Mann's oral history she talks about what it was like working with US military intelligence during World War I, going on to be an editor for the USDA's Bureau of Entomology, marrying an entomologist who would be tapped to be the fifth superintendent and first director of the United States National Zoological Park and life in the middle the Zoo's expansion and beyond. Join with us in transcribing this second interview covering a period ranging from before the Great Depression to the middle of World War II.

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27 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Lucile Q. Mann - Oral History, Session 3

If it was your job to bring a giraffe back to the National Zoological Park, how would you do it? That was a question for National Zoo Director William Mann and his wife, Lucile, on their expedition to the East Indies with the National Geographic Society in 1937. Find out the fascinating details of that expedition, and many more, in Lucile Q. Mann's incredible oral history interview! Lucile and William traveled the world, conducting research and bringing animals back to Washington, D.C. Learn more about their wild adventures and help other volunteers transcribe this interview.

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47 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Lucile Q. Mann - Oral History, Session 4

When the United States entered World War II, it impacted the way Americans lived and worked, touching on every aspect of their lives. How did the war impact the National Zoological Park? Find out about how the National Zoo and its staff were involved the war effort in this fascinating oral history from Lucile Q. Mann, wife of National Zoo Director William Mann. Lucile, a writer and explorer in her own right, reflects on their collecting trips abroad during the war, as well as William's military service. Learn more about WWII-era zoological field work and help transcribe this incredible interview!

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44 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Lucile Q. Mann - Oral History, Session 5

The National Zoological Park has housed a variety of well-known inhabitants: Smokey the Bear, Hsing-Hsing and Ling-Ling, the giant pandas, among many others. How did those beloved animals come to live at the National Zoo? Get the inside story behind some of the Zoo's most notable names from Lucile Q. Mann, wife of National Zoo director William Mann! Lucile and her husband traveled the world, conducting research and bringing animals back to Washington, D.C. Learn more about their life on the wild side and help other volunteers transcribe this insightful interview.

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31 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

Lucile Q. Mann - Oral History, Session 6

What kind of person does it take to be in charge of a zoo? For National Zoo Director William Mann it meant a combination of the serious and the whimsical--extensive research with a flair for impromptu opera singing, traveling the world while playing practical jokes. Hear all about the energetic Mann behind the Zoo from William's wife, Lucile, in the conclusion of her oral history interview. Lucile, a researcher and editor in her own right, traveled the world with her husband on behalf of the National Zoo. Learn more about their exciting life and help other volunteers transcribe this incredible interview.

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178 Total Pages 0 Contributing Members

Madam C. J. Walker Collection

Madam C. J. Walker (December 23, 1867 - May 25, 1919), born Sarah Breedlove, was an African American entrepreneur, educator, and philanthropist. She overcame poverty and other hardships to become a self-made millionaire. Her company, the Madam C.J. Walker Manufacturing Company, manufactured, distributed, and sold hair care and beauty products, including skin care items, body powders, lipstick, and perfumes developed for African Americans. Help us transcribe information about historic artifacts related to Walker and her work to uncover the fascinating history of Madam C.J. Walker, her company, and black beauty culture in early twentieth century America

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