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20 Total Pages 31 Contributing Members

LAW, RUTH

This collection of photographs, written notes, articles, photocopies of news clippings, correspondence, and biographies was used by Claudia M. Oakes to prepare the publication,�United States Women in Aviation Through World War I (Smithsonian Institution Press: Washington, D.C., 1978). She donated these materials sometime after the book's completion.

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18 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Leadership Handbook for the National Council of Negro Women, 23rd Annual Convention, 1958

Imagine launching a campaign to raise $55,000 in 1945, the year that World War II ended. This bold challenge by the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) exemplifies the highly organized activism of the clubwoman movement. In 1935, educator Mary McLeod Bethune founded the NCNW, building on the legacy of the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs (NACW), founded in 1896 to combat lynching. Both united local African American women’s clubs across the U.S. Clubwomen supported African American communities in myriad ways: fighting poverty, providing education, offering child care for working mothers, advocating for civil rights, and striving for international peace. A diverse collection of documents from the 1940s to 1960s awaits transcription, such as event programs, flyers, and tickets; an obituary; a meeting agenda in Spanish; and, a leadership handbook. Learn more about NACW programs that honored abolitionist Frederick Douglass and raised funds to preserve his home in Washington, D.C. and NCNW programs on cultural exchanges with British women after World War II. Look for the integral relationship of church and community; churches often hosted clubwoman events. Notice the presence of music and art, verbally and visually. Discover how African American clubwomen carried out their mission of “lifting as we climb,” and find a message written in the stars. Thank you for helping to make these archival documents searchable!

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24 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Lecture: Faith Ringgold (part 1 of 2)

Faith Ringgold presents on her work in conjunction with "The Artist's Mother: Portraits and Homages." Ringgold describes her mother's strong influence on her art and her father's lack thereof. Her mother, fashion designer Mme. Willie Posey, was responsible for the use of fabric in her work. Ringgold discusses her doll work, masks, the Harlem community in which she was raised, and the geneses of her "quilts."

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10 Total Pages 16 Contributing Members

Lecture: Faith Ringgold (part 2 of 2)

Faith Ringgold presents on her work in conjunction with "The Artist's Mother: Portraits and Homages." Ringgold describes her mother's strong influence on her art and her father's lack thereof. Her mother, fashion designer Mme. Willie Posey, was responsible for the use of fabric in her work. Ringgold discusses her doll work, masks, the Harlem community in which she was raised, and the geneses of her "quilts."

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5 Total Pages 34 Contributing Members

Lecture: Voices in African American Literature (part 1 of 2)

"Voices in African American Literature." Harry Jackson welcomes and introduces Eugene Ethelbert Miller. Miller discusses trends in contemporary African American literature and the nature of this literary tradition. He highlights the themes of male bonding, the arrival of black homosexual literature, the new generation of African American women writers, and the impact of Spike Lee as a writer. He reads excerpts from pieces by August Wilson, Ntozake Shange, Alice Walker, and others to elaborate on these themes and ends with readings of his own poetry.

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11 Total Pages 17 Contributing Members

Lecture: Voices in African American Literature (part 2 of 2)

"Voices in African American Literature." Harry Jackson welcomes and introduces Eugene Ethelbert Miller. Miller discusses trends in contemporary African American literature and the nature of this literary tradition. He highlights the themes of male bonding, the arrival of black homosexual literature, the new generation of African American women writers, and the impact of Spike Lee as a writer. He reads excerpts from pieces by August Wilson, Ntozake Shange, Alice Walker, and others to elaborate on these themes and ends with readings of his own poetry.

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2,030 Total Pages 871 Contributing Members

Lee Ya-Ching Papers

Lee Ya-Ching was a flying Good Will Ambassador for United China Relief during World War II. The daughter of a Hong Kong industrialist, Lee Ya-Ching attended school in England in 1933 and she began her flight training at Switzerland's Cointrin-Ecole d'Aviation, obtaining the first pilot's license ever granted by the school to a woman. She later continued her training at the Boeing School of Aviation, in Oakland, California. In 1936, Lee Ya-Ching returned to China where she made an air survey of 30,000 miles for the Chinese Army and was appointed instructor of the Shanghai Municipal Air School until the outbreak of war caused the school to close. From 1938 until 1943, Lee Ya-Ching flew across the United States and then Latin America soliciting funds for the benefit of Chinese war victims. Note: Please do not describe the images, photographs, or maps that appear in this project. We are only seeking transcriptions.

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20 Total Pages 28 Contributing Members

Lee Ya-Ching Papers - Air Babies By Elvy Kalep

Lee Ya-Ching was a flying Good Will Ambassador for United China Relief during World War II. The daughter of a Hong Kong industrialist, Lee Ya-Ching attended school in England in 1933 and she began her flight training at Switzerland's Cointrin-Ecole d'Aviation, obtaining the first pilot's license ever granted by the school to a woman. She later continued her training at the Boeing School of Aviation, in Oakland, California. In 1936, Lee Ya-Ching returned to China where she made an air survey of 30,000 miles for the Chinese Army and was appointed instructor of the Shanghai Municipal Air School until the outbreak of war caused the school to close. From 1938 until 1943, Lee Ya-Ching flew across the United States and then Latin America soliciting funds for the benefit of Chinese war victims. Note: Please do not describe the images, photographs, or maps that appear in this project. We are only seeking transcriptions.

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5 Total Pages 20 Contributing Members

Lee Ya-Ching Papers - Hilda Yen -- biographical information

Lee Ya-Ching was a flying Good Will Ambassador for United China Relief during World War II. The daughter of a Hong Kong industrialist, Lee Ya-Ching attended school in England in 1933 and she began her flight training at Switzerland's Cointrin-Ecole d'Aviation, obtaining the first pilot's license ever granted by the school to a woman. She later continued her training at the Boeing School of Aviation, in Oakland, California. In 1936, Lee Ya-Ching returned to China where she made an air survey of 30,000 miles for the Chinese Army and was appointed instructor of the Shanghai Municipal Air School until the outbreak of war caused the school to close. From 1938 until 1943, Lee Ya-Ching flew across the United States and then Latin America soliciting funds for the benefit of Chinese war victims. Note: Please do not describe the images, photographs, or maps that appear in this project. We are only seeking transcriptions.

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93 Total Pages 64 Contributing Members

Lee Ya-Ching Papers - Miscellaneous Newspaper clippings

Lee Ya-Ching was a flying Good Will Ambassador for United China Relief during World War II. The daughter of a Hong Kong industrialist, Lee Ya-Ching attended school in England in 1933 and she began her flight training at Switzerland's Cointrin-Ecole d'Aviation, obtaining the first pilot's license ever granted by the school to a woman. She later continued her training at the Boeing School of Aviation, in Oakland, California. In 1936, Lee Ya-Ching returned to China where she made an air survey of 30,000 miles for the Chinese Army and was appointed instructor of the Shanghai Municipal Air School until the outbreak of war caused the school to close. From 1938 until 1943, Lee Ya-Ching flew across the United States and then Latin America soliciting funds for the benefit of Chinese war victims. Note: Please do not describe the images, photographs, or maps that appear in this project. We are only seeking transcriptions.

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