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7 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

National Association of Colored Women's Clubs, Inc., Program in Commemoration of the Life and Works of Frederick Douglass, 1961

Imagine launching a campaign to raise $55,000 in 1945, the year that World War II ended. This bold challenge by the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) exemplifies the highly organized activism of the clubwoman movement. In 1935, educator Mary McLeod Bethune founded the NCNW, building on the legacy of the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs (NACW), founded in 1896 to combat lynching. Both united local African American women’s clubs across the U.S. Clubwomen supported African American communities in myriad ways: fighting poverty, providing education, offering child care for working mothers, advocating for civil rights, and striving for international peace. A diverse collection of documents from the 1940s to 1960s awaits transcription, such as event programs, flyers, and tickets; an obituary; a meeting agenda in Spanish; and, a leadership handbook. Learn more about NACW programs that honored abolitionist Frederick Douglass and raised funds to preserve his home in Washington, D.C. and NCNW programs on cultural exchanges with British women after World War II. Look for the integral relationship of church and community; churches often hosted clubwoman events. Notice the presence of music and art, verbally and visually. Discover how African American clubwomen carried out their mission of “lifting as we climb,” and find a message written in the stars. Thank you for helping to make these archival documents searchable!

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2 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

National Council of Negro Women flyer to Welcome British War Workers to America

Imagine launching a campaign to raise $55,000 in 1945, the year that World War II ended. This bold challenge by the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) exemplifies the highly organized activism of the clubwoman movement. In 1935, educator Mary McLeod Bethune founded the NCNW, building on the legacy of the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs (NACW), founded in 1896 to combat lynching. Both united local African American women’s clubs across the U.S. Clubwomen supported African American communities in myriad ways: fighting poverty, providing education, offering child care for working mothers, advocating for civil rights, and striving for international peace. A diverse collection of documents from the 1940s to 1960s awaits transcription, such as event programs, flyers, and tickets; an obituary; a meeting agenda in Spanish; and, a leadership handbook. Learn more about NACW programs that honored abolitionist Frederick Douglass and raised funds to preserve his home in Washington, D.C. and NCNW programs on cultural exchanges with British women after World War II. Look for the integral relationship of church and community; churches often hosted clubwoman events. Notice the presence of music and art, verbally and visually. Discover how African American clubwomen carried out their mission of “lifting as we climb,” and find a message written in the stars. Thank you for helping to make these archival documents searchable!

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3 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

National Council of Negro Women Brochure, 1946

Imagine launching a campaign to raise $55,000 in 1945, the year that World War II ended. This bold challenge by the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) exemplifies the highly organized activism of the clubwoman movement. In 1935, educator Mary McLeod Bethune founded the NCNW, building on the legacy of the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs (NACW), founded in 1896 to combat lynching. Both united local African American women’s clubs across the U.S. Clubwomen supported African American communities in myriad ways: fighting poverty, providing education, offering child care for working mothers, advocating for civil rights, and striving for international peace. A diverse collection of documents from the 1940s to 1960s awaits transcription, such as event programs, flyers, and tickets; an obituary; a meeting agenda in Spanish; and, a leadership handbook. Learn more about NACW programs that honored abolitionist Frederick Douglass and raised funds to preserve his home in Washington, D.C. and NCNW programs on cultural exchanges with British women after World War II. Look for the integral relationship of church and community; churches often hosted clubwoman events. Notice the presence of music and art, verbally and visually. Discover how African American clubwomen carried out their mission of “lifting as we climb,” and find a message written in the stars. Thank you for helping to make these archival documents searchable!

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23 Total Pages 38 Contributing Members

National Sports Vol. VII No. 7

Althea Gibson was one of the most formidable sportswomen of the mid-20th century. She was the number-one-ranked female tennis player in the world in 1957 and 1958, a two-time Wimbledon ladies singles champion, two-time U.S. Open ladies singles champion, winner of multiple doubles and mixed doubles tournaments, and a professional golfer. Gibson took to tennis as a teen and despite her skill was often prohibited from playing in elite tournaments because of her race. In 1950, lobbying by the American Tennis Association and former tennis player Alice Marble forced the U.S. Tennis Association’s hand and Gibson became the first African American to compete in the U.S. Nationals. Help us transcribe this issue of India’s National Sports Magazine to learn about how the world covered Gibson’s accomplishments.

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34 Total Pages 20 Contributing Members

Nina Howell Starr Papers, Correspondence between Minnie Evans and Nina Starr, 1962

Nina Howell Starr (1903-2000) was a photographer, art dealer, and art historian who worked primarily in New York City. As art historian, self-proclaimed critic, and civil rights and feminist advocate, Starr lectured widely, wrote articles and letters to editors, and corresponded with many notable art world figures. She became especially interested in outsider and folk art. Starr met outsider artist Minnie Evans in 1962 and became Evans' lifelong friend, advocate, and representative dealer. She wrote about Evans and introduced Evans' works to galleries and other exhibition spaces in New York, including the Whitney Museum, where she guest-curated an exhibition of Evans' work in 1975. Help transcribe correspondence between Evans and Starr to learn more about their lives and legacies.

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8 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Nina Howell Starr Papers, Correspondence between Minnie Evans and Nina Starr, 1963

Nina Howell Starr (1903-2000) was a photographer, art dealer, and art historian who worked primarily in New York City. As art historian, self-proclaimed critic, and civil rights and feminist advocate, Starr lectured widely, wrote articles and letters to editors, and corresponded with many notable art world figures. She became especially interested in outsider and folk art. Starr met outsider artist Minnie Evans in 1962 and became Evans' lifelong friend, advocate, and representative dealer. She wrote about Evans and introduced Evans' works to galleries and other exhibition spaces in New York, including the Whitney Museum, where she guest-curated an exhibition of Evans' work in 1975. Help transcribe correspondence between Evans and Starr to learn more about their lives and legacies.

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73 Total Pages 50 Contributing Members

Nina Howell Starr Papers, Correspondence between Minnie Evans and Nina Starr, 1965

Nina Howell Starr (1903-2000) was a photographer, art dealer, and art historian who worked primarily in New York City. As art historian, self-proclaimed critic, and civil rights and feminist advocate, Starr lectured widely, wrote articles and letters to editors, and corresponded with many notable art world figures. She became especially interested in outsider and folk art. Starr met outsider artist Minnie Evans in 1962 and became Evans' lifelong friend, advocate, and representative dealer. She wrote about Evans and introduced Evans' works to galleries and other exhibition spaces in New York, including the Whitney Museum, where she guest-curated an exhibition of Evans' work in 1975. Help transcribe correspondence between Evans and Starr to learn more about their lives and legacies.

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79 Total Pages 49 Contributing Members

Nina Howell Starr Papers, Correspondence between Minnie Evans and Nina Starr, 1966

Nina Howell Starr (1903-2000) was a photographer, art dealer, and art historian who worked primarily in New York City. As art historian, self-proclaimed critic, and civil rights and feminist advocate, Starr lectured widely, wrote articles and letters to editors, and corresponded with many notable art world figures. She became especially interested in outsider and folk art. Starr met outsider artist Minnie Evans in 1962 and became Evans' lifelong friend, advocate, and representative dealer. She wrote about Evans and introduced Evans' works to galleries and other exhibition spaces in New York, including the Whitney Museum, where she guest-curated an exhibition of Evans' work in 1975. Help transcribe correspondence between Evans and Starr to learn more about their lives and legacies.

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73 Total Pages 35 Contributing Members

Nina Howell Starr Papers, Correspondence between Minnie Evans and Nina Starr, 1967

Nina Howell Starr (1903-2000) was a photographer, art dealer, and art historian who worked primarily in New York City. As art historian, self-proclaimed critic, and civil rights and feminist advocate, Starr lectured widely, wrote articles and letters to editors, and corresponded with many notable art world figures. She became especially interested in outsider and folk art. Starr met outsider artist Minnie Evans in 1962 and became Evans' lifelong friend, advocate, and representative dealer. She wrote about Evans and introduced Evans' works to galleries and other exhibition spaces in New York, including the Whitney Museum, where she guest-curated an exhibition of Evans' work in 1975. Help transcribe correspondence between Evans and Starr to learn more about their lives and legacies.

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4 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Norma Merrick Sklarek Archive, Series 1: Eulogy to Walter Ernest Merrick a devoted member Of The Karma Club...

Norma Merrick Sklarek (1926–2012) was a renowned architect and a woman of firsts who broke racial and gender barriers earning her place in the male-dominated world of architecture. Sklarek was the first African American woman licensed to practice architecture in New York and California and the first Black woman member and fellow of the American Institute of Architects. Sklarek worked for numerous architectural firms and in 1985 she founded her own women-led business, Siegel, Sklarek, and Diamond, the first of its kind. She led large scale projects including the Fox Plaza, World Finance Center, United States Embassy in Tokyo, Japan, The Mall of America, and Terminal One at Los Angeles International Airport. The Sklarek archival collection offers an in-depth view of Sklarek’s life and career, including family records, resumes, business ephemera, photographs, correspondence, publications, clippings, architectural drawings, and awards. Help us transcribe this collection that highlights the prestigious career of Norma Merrick Sklarek and discover how she paved the way for future women and African American architects.

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