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146 Total Pages 35 Contributing Members

William and Lucile Mann's South American trip, 1939

What memories do you capture in a scrapbook? Lucile Quarry Mann compiled this scrapbook about a 1939 trip to Argentina and Brazil with her husband William Mann, then Director of the National Zoological Park. The trip's goal was collecting and exchanging live animals with zoos in South America and the scrapbook includes a variety of items to capture many different aspects of the trip: photographs, news clippings, menus, passenger lists, postcards, original artwork (by Newbery),and advertisements for theatrical events. Transcribe with other volunteers and discover the memories Lucile Mann chose to safekeep in this scrapbook.

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8 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Winter in Mexico lecture recording, undated, reel 1 part 2, Lisa Chickering and Jeanne Porterfield Collection

These materials directly relate to Chickering and Porterfield's professional film output, including corresponding film lectures delivered by Chickering and Porterfield on the travel lecture circuit. Lecture recordings are largely undated but provide a glimpse into the timing and delivery of (and audience reaction to) Chickering and Porterfield's longer lecture films. Some recordings include snippets of other performers.Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

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15 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Winter in Mexico lecture recording, undated, reel 2 part 1, Lisa Chickering and Jeanne Porterfield Collection

These materials directly relate to Chickering and Porterfield's professional film output, including corresponding film lectures delivered by Chickering and Porterfield on the travel lecture circuit. Lecture recordings are largely undated but provide a glimpse into the timing and delivery of (and audience reaction to) Chickering and Porterfield's longer lecture films. Some recordings include snippets of other performers.Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

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2,372 Total Pages 310 Contributing Members

Women's History at the Archives of American Art

Celebrate the history of women artists and art historians by exploring and transcribing archival collections from the Archives of American Art. Through diaries, notebooks, essays, and correspondence, learn about the life and careers of painters, sculptors, writers, critics, art historians, and other creative women who made their mark on American history.
During the month of April, we're featuring documents from the papers of Abstract Expressionist painter Lee Krasner (1908-1984), who worked for New Deal government art programs, including the Federal Art Project.

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Subprojects

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26 Total Pages 16 Contributing Members

Workbook for the National Council of Negro Women, 23rd Annual Convention, 1958

Imagine launching a campaign to raise $55,000 in 1945, the year that World War II ended. This bold challenge by the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) exemplifies the highly organized activism of the clubwoman movement. In 1935, educator Mary McLeod Bethune founded the NCNW, building on the legacy of the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs (NACW), founded in 1896 to combat lynching. Both united local African American women’s clubs across the U.S. Clubwomen supported African American communities in myriad ways: fighting poverty, providing education, offering child care for working mothers, advocating for civil rights, and striving for international peace. A diverse collection of documents from the 1940s to 1960s awaits transcription, such as event programs, flyers, and tickets; an obituary; a meeting agenda in Spanish; and, a leadership handbook. Learn more about NACW programs that honored abolitionist Frederick Douglass and raised funds to preserve his home in Washington, D.C. and NCNW programs on cultural exchanges with British women after World War II. Look for the integral relationship of church and community; churches often hosted clubwoman events. Notice the presence of music and art, verbally and visually. Discover how African American clubwomen carried out their mission of “lifting as we climb,” and find a message written in the stars. Thank you for helping to make these archival documents searchable!

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2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

World Security and You, The Washington Metropolitan Council of The National Council of Negro Women Flyer, 1945

Imagine launching a campaign to raise $55,000 in 1945, the year that World War II ended. This bold challenge by the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) exemplifies the highly organized activism of the clubwoman movement. In 1935, educator Mary McLeod Bethune founded the NCNW, building on the legacy of the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs (NACW), founded in 1896 to combat lynching. Both united local African American women’s clubs across the U.S. Clubwomen supported African American communities in myriad ways: fighting poverty, providing education, offering child care for working mothers, advocating for civil rights, and striving for international peace. A diverse collection of documents from the 1940s to 1960s awaits transcription, such as event programs, flyers, and tickets; an obituary; a meeting agenda in Spanish; and, a leadership handbook. Learn more about NACW programs that honored abolitionist Frederick Douglass and raised funds to preserve his home in Washington, D.C. and NCNW programs on cultural exchanges with British women after World War II. Look for the integral relationship of church and community; churches often hosted clubwoman events. Notice the presence of music and art, verbally and visually. Discover how African American clubwomen carried out their mission of “lifting as we climb,” and find a message written in the stars. Thank you for helping to make these archival documents searchable!

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