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21 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

George L. Nelson papers - Writings: "Indian Revival in Virginia" and Miscellaneous, c. 1920

Help up transcribe "Writings: "Indian Revival in Virginia" and Miscellaneous, c. 1920" (Box 1, Folder 12) from the George L. Nelson papers! Chief George L. Nelson (Rappahannock) was born circa 1883 in Indian Neck, Virginia to parents Samuel and Virginia Nelson. A member of the Rappahannock community, Nelson began working to incorporate his tribe under the state laws of Virginia. The Rappahannock Indian Association was founded in 1921 with George Nelson as Chief. The George L. Nelson papers consist of documents belonging to Chief Nelson and left in the possession of his daughter Waneta Swain. The bulk of these documents relate to the work done by Chief Nelson in establishing the Rappahannock Indian Association in 1922 and the activities that led to the recognition of the tribe as part of the larger Virginia Indians Powhatan Confederacy.

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21 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

German Advertising Trade Cards collection, 1880-1940

Help up transcribe "German Advertising Trade Cards collection, 1880-1940" from the German Advertising Trade Cards collection. Please note, we are only seeking transcriptions of the text within these collections. Please do not describe the images. The German Advertising Trade Cards collection consists of 11 chromolithograph trading and advertising cards dating to the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. These 11 cards were written in German, distributed by different manufacturers throughout Germany and Europe, and were used to advertise a number of products including pasta, meat extract, condensed milk, coffee, chocolate, cigarettes, and metal polish, among others. One of the better known companies included in this collection is the Liebig Company of Germany. In addition to advertising German manufactures, these cards feature romanticized images of Native Americans on the front of each card, and include sometimes fanciful or incorrect textual descriptions about Native life on the reverse. Images depict Native individuals and groups throughout North America, but tend to focus specifically on Northeast, Great Lakes, and Plains communities.

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484 Total Pages 0 Contributing Members

Grace F. Thorpe Collection

Grace Thorpe (1921-2008), Sac and Fox, was a WWII veteran and Native Rights activist. The daughter of famed athlete Jim Thorpe, Grace served in the Women’s Army Corps (WAC) from 1943-1945. She served as a recruiter for the WAC before being sent overseas to New Guinea, the Philippines and Japan. Grace was later awarded the Bronze star for her service in the Battle of New Guinea. Following the end of the war, Grace remained in Japan with her husband Lieutenant Fred W. Seely and worked at General MacArthur Headquarters as Chief of the Recruitment Section, Department of Army Civilians. Later in life Grace moved to Arizona where she became involved with American Indian tribes. Grace was appointed Economic Development Conference Coordinator for the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI)'s 1968 and 1969 conferences. In 1969-1970, Grace joined Native American Activists at the occupation of Alcatraz Island for three months and managed their publicity. She then served as a Congressional Intern from 1974-1975 for Senator James Abourezk and was later appointed Legislative Assistant with the Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs and as a Task Force Program and Planning Analyst for the American Indian Policy Review Commission. During this time she also began working on the restoration of her father's 1912 Olympic titles as well as other projects to recognize and honor her father. After returning to her tribal homeland in Oklahoma she became active in tribal affairs and in 1983 successfully restored her father's Olympic record. In later years, Grace served her tribe as a tribal judge, health commissioner, and became an environmental activist opposing nuclear waste on tribal lands.

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4 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

H. Arlo Nimmo Papers - Songs, Binua, Box 9

The papers of H. Arlo Nimmo document his field research among the Bajau (also known as Sama Dilaut) in Tawi-Tawi Province in the southern Philippines in 1963, 1965-1967, 1977, 1982, and 1997. The collection consists of correspondence, field journals, censuses, genealogies, kinship charts, transcripts of songs, unpublished manuscripts, card files, photographs, sound recordings, and maps. Nimmo's initial research focused on social change, but he collected data about other aspects of Bajau culture, including social organization, kinship, religion, fishing, boats, boat-building, art, and music. Help us transcribe the series of Bajau songs that Nimmo recorded and translated to make this material searchable and more accessible for researchers around the world. Binua are lullabies in Bajau, and are usually sung during the evening to soothe sleepy or fussy babies. Please note that this material may be in English and/or other languages of the Malayo-Polynesian language family.

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33 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

H. Arlo Nimmo Papers - Songs, Kalangan Baliu, Box 9

The papers of H. Arlo Nimmo document his field research among the Bajau (also known as Sama Dilaut) in Tawi-Tawi Province in the southern Philippines in 1963, 1965-1967, 1977, 1982, and 1997. The collection consists of correspondence, field journals, censuses, genealogies, kinship charts, transcripts of songs, unpublished manuscripts, card files, photographs, sound recordings, and maps. Nimmo's initial research focused on social change, but he collected data about other aspects of Bajau culture, including social organization, kinship, religion, fishing, boats, boat-building, art, and music. Help us transcribe the songs that Nimmo recorded and translated to make this material searchable and more accessible for researchers around the world. "Kalangan baliu," can be translated to "Songs of the Wind." These songs are almost exclusively sung by men, during idle hours of fishing and sailing trips, usually at night. These are brief vignettes, similar to the Japanese haiku. Please note that this material may be in English and/or other languages of the Malayo-Polynesian language family.

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3 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

H. Arlo Nimmo Papers - Songs, Kalangan Kalitan, Box 9

The papers of H. Arlo Nimmo document his field research among the Bajau (also known as Sama Dilaut) in Tawi-Tawi Province in the southern Philippines in 1963, 1965-1967, 1977, 1982, and 1997. The collection consists of correspondence, field journals, censuses, genealogies, kinship charts, transcripts of songs, unpublished manuscripts, card files, photographs, sound recordings, and maps. Nimmo's initial research focused on social change, but he collected data about other aspects of Bajau culture, including social organization, kinship, religion, fishing, boats, boat-building, art, and music. Help us transcribe the songs that Nimmo recorded and translated to make this material searchable and more accessible for researchers around the world. The kalangan kalitan, or "shark song," is sung almost exclusively by Bajau men, while fishing- alone or in pairs- for sharks in the open sea. While fishing, the men shake coconut shell-rattles in the water as they murmer these songs to attract the shark. The songs are meant to flatter the sharks to attract them to the hooks. Please note that this material may be in English and/or other languages of the Malayo-Polynesian language family.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

H. Arlo Nimmo Papers - Songs, Kalangan Kamun, Box 9

The papers of H. Arlo Nimmo document his field research among the Bajau (also known as Sama Dilaut) in Tawi-Tawi Province in the southern Philippines in 1963, 1965-1967, 1977, 1982, and 1997. The collection consists of correspondence, field journals, censuses, genealogies, kinship charts, transcripts of songs, unpublished manuscripts, card files, photographs, sound recordings, and maps. Nimmo's initial research focused on social change, but he collected data about other aspects of Bajau culture, including social organization, kinship, religion, fishing, boats, boat-building, art, and music. Help us transcribe the songs that Nimmo recorded and translated to make this material searchable and more accessible for researchers around the world. Similar to the kalangan kalitan, the kalangan kamun are songs meant to attract a certain type of fish. The "kamun" are reef-dwelling crustaceans fished by Bajau men and boys during low tide. Fisherman, sing these comic songs to coax reluctant female kamun. Please note that this material may be in English and/or other languages of the Malayo-Polynesian language family.

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94 Total Pages 41 Contributing Members

H. Arlo Nimmo Papers - Songs, Kata Kata Chants, Box 9

The papers of H. Arlo Nimmo document his field research among the Bajau (also known as Sama Dilaut) in Tawi-Tawi Province in the southern Philippines in 1963, 1965-1967, 1977, 1982, and 1997. The collection consists of correspondence, field journals, censuses, genealogies, kinship charts, transcripts of songs, unpublished manuscripts, card files, photographs, sound recordings, and maps. Nimmo's initial research focused on social change, but he collected data about other aspects of Bajau culture, including social organization, kinship, religion, fishing, boats, boat-building, art, and music. Help us transcribe the songs that Nimmo recorded and translated to make this material searchable and more accessible for researchers around the world. The kata-kata chants are sung because of a critical illness or crisis among the Bajau. They stem from an ancient tradition of chants in Samal, the Bajau language, and are known, and sung, by only a few older men within the community, who are paid for their services. Please note that this material may be in English and/or other languages of the Malayo-Polynesian language family.

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3 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

H. Arlo Nimmo Papers - Songs, Lia Lia, Box 9

The papers of H. Arlo Nimmo document his field research among the Bajau (also known as Sama Dilaut) in Tawi-Tawi Province in the southern Philippines in 1963, 1965-1967, 1977, 1982, and 1997. The collection consists of correspondence, field journals, censuses, genealogies, kinship charts, transcripts of songs, unpublished manuscripts, card files, photographs, sound recordings, and maps. Nimmo's initial research focused on social change, but he collected data about other aspects of Bajau culture, including social organization, kinship, religion, fishing, boats, boat-building, art, and music. Help us transcribe the series of Bajau songs that Nimmo recorded and translated to make this material searchable and more accessible for researchers around the world. Lia-Lia are Bajau songs commonly sung by small children, often during anger. This form of song among the Bajau provides an opportunity for children to vent their displeasure through song. Please note that this material may be in English and/or other languages of the Malayo-Polynesian language family.

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31 Total Pages 17 Contributing Members

H. Arlo Nimmo Papers - Songs, Miscellaneous, Box 9

The papers of H. Arlo Nimmo document his field research among the Bajau (also known as Sama Dilaut) in Tawi-Tawi Province in the southern Philippines in 1963, 1965-1967, 1977, 1982, and 1997. The collection consists of correspondence, field journals, censuses, genealogies, kinship charts, transcripts of songs, unpublished manuscripts, card files, photographs, sound recordings, and maps. Nimmo's initial research focused on social change, but he collected data about other aspects of Bajau culture, including social organization, kinship, religion, fishing, boats, boat-building, art, and music. Help us transcribe the songs that Nimmo recorded and translated to make this material searchable and more accessible for researchers around the world. Please note that this material may be in English and/or other languages of the Malayo-Polynesian language family.

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