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83 Total Pages 25 Contributing Members

H. Arlo Nimmo Papers - Songs, Tenes Tenes, Box 9

The papers of H. Arlo Nimmo document his field research among the Bajau (also known as Sama Dilaut) in Tawi-Tawi Province in the southern Philippines in 1963, 1965-1967, 1977, 1982, and 1997. The collection consists of correspondence, field journals, censuses, genealogies, kinship charts, transcripts of songs, unpublished manuscripts, card files, photographs, sound recordings, and maps. Nimmo's initial research focused on social change, but he collected data about other aspects of Bajau culture, including social organization, kinship, religion, fishing, boats, boat-building, art, and music. Help us transcribe the series of Bajau songs that Nimmo recorded and translated to make this material searchable and more accessible for researchers around the world. Unlike the Binua or Lia-Lia, Tenes-Tenes songs are sung widely by children, teenagers, and some adults and don't focus on any topic, but rather consist of whatever the singer is thinking about at the time. Please note that this material may be in English and/or other languages of the Malayo-Polynesian language family.

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25 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Helen C. Rountree Lecture to Anthropological Society of Washington, 1988 October 18-19, Side 1, Helen C. Rountree Papers

This is part one of a lecture given to the Anthropological Society of Washington by Helen Rountree, who was a professor at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. Rountree studied the history of the Virginia Tribes from the 17th century to the 21st century and is considered a leading expert on Pocahontas. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

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19 Total Pages 28 Contributing Members

Helen C. Rountree Lecture to Anthropological Society of Washington, 1988 October 18-19, Side 2, Helen C. Rountree Papers

This is part one of a lecture given to the Anthropological Society of Washington by Helen Rountree, who was a professor at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. Rountree studied the history of the Virginia Tribes from the 17th century to the 21st century and is considered a leading expert on Pocahontas. Please be aware that this audio recording is a bit difficult to hear given the poor audio quality. Do the best you can, and reach out anytime for help! Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

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88 Total Pages 32 Contributing Members

Indian School Diary, 1932, from the Olive Rush Papers

Illustrator, muralist, and art educator Olive Rush was born in Indiana in 1875. After several visits and exhibitions in New Mexico, Rush moved permanently to Santa Fe in 1920. She established a studio and home in an adobe house on Canyon Road, which became a main thoroughfare of the Santa Fe artists' community. Rush's enthusiastic work in the 1930s with the young Pueblo artists is credited with helping to bring about a flourishing of Native American visual art in New Mexico. Rush continued to work with Native American artists throughout her life, and many of her associates went on to gain national reputations, including Harrison Begay, Awa-Tsireh, Pop Chalee, Pablita Valerde, and Ha-So-De (Narciso Abeyta). Help transcribe the diary Olive Rush kept in 1932, the year she was hired to teach at the Santa Fe Indian School.

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79 Total Pages 35 Contributing Members

John C. Casey letter books - Mexico and Florida: Letter Book and Order Book, 1847-1856

Help up transcribe "Mexico and Florida: Letter Book and Order Book, 1847-1856" (Box 1, Item 3) from the John C. Casey letter books collection! The collection of John C. Casey journals includes three original letter books from Captain John Casey's time in Monterrey, Mexico during the Mexican-American War from 1847-1848 and as an emigration agent at the Seminole Agency in Florida from 1848 to 1856 and his time in. This covers a period of time that includes the beginning of the third Seminole War. Additionally, one of the letter books also contains a journal of Casey's operations in the Indian Department in Florida from his arrival in August of 1848 until October of 1849.

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27 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

John C. Casey letter books - Florida Seminole Agency: Letter book and account current, 1850-1856

Help up transcribe "Florida Seminole Agency: Letter book and account current, 1850-1856" (Box 1, Item 1) from the John C. Casey letter books collection! The collection of John C. Casey journals includes three original letter books from Captain John Casey's time in Monterrey, Mexico during the Mexican-American War from 1847-1848 and as an emigration agent at the Seminole Agency in Florida from 1848 to 1856 and his time in. This covers a period of time that includes the beginning of the third Seminole War. Additionally, one of the letter books also contains a journal of Casey's operations in the Indian Department in Florida from his arrival in August of 1848 until October of 1849.

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105 Total Pages 40 Contributing Members

John C. Casey letter books - Florida Seminole Agency: Letter Book and Journal of Operations, 1848-1856

Help up transcribe "Florida Seminole Agency: Letter Book and Journal of Operations, 1848-1856" (Box 1, Item 2) from the John C. Casey letter books collection! The collection of John C. Casey journals includes three original letter books from Captain John Casey's time in Monterrey, Mexico during the Mexican-American War from 1847-1848 and as an emigration agent at the Seminole Agency in Florida from 1848 to 1856 and his time in. This covers a period of time that includes the beginning of the third Seminole War. Additionally, one of the letter books also contains a journal of Casey's operations in the Indian Department in Florida from his arrival in August of 1848 until October of 1849.

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434 Total Pages 31 Contributing Members

Kwakiutl: MS 948: Kwakiutl texts with interlinear translations (1897)

This manuscript, purchased from Franz Boas, by the Bureau of American Ethnology on May 16, 1901 for $250, is in black ink with red interlinear translations, and blue and black pencil changes in unidentified handwriting. The materials are in Kwakiutl (Kwakwaka'wakw) and English.

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4 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

Letter from James G. Swan to Major John Wesley Powell - NAA MS 1035

Written March 30, 1878, this letter includes notes and corrections to "Contributions to North American Ethnology, Volume 1, 1877" (Part I, W. H. Dall, "Tribes of the Extreme Northwest;" Part II, George Gibbs, "Tribes of Western Washington and Northwestern Oregon," prepared for the Bureau of American Ethnology. Help us transcribe this letter to make it more accessible for NAA researchers from around the world.

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90 Total Pages 69 Contributing Members

Leuman Maurice Waugh collection - Correspondence with Alaska Survey Data and Expedition Logistics, 1934

Help us transcribe “Correspondence with Alaska Survey Data and Expedition Logistics, 1934” (Box 3, Folder 2) from the Leuman Maurice Waugh Collection! Leuman Maurice Waugh (1877-1972) was a dentist who studied and treated Indigenous populations in the Bering Sea and Alaska Arctic regions. Waugh received his D.D.S. from the University of Buffalo in 1900. Waugh married Helen "Esty" Marshall, and had a son, Donald (also a dentist), and a daughter, Dorothy. Over the course of five summers, Waugh privately carried out a Labrador study between 1921 and 1927. In 1929, Waugh volunteered to undertake Alaskan studies on dental health research among the Inuit for the U.S. Public Health Service, which appointed Waugh Dental Director (Reserve). While collaborating with the U.S. Public Health Service, Waugh studied twelve Alaskan Inuit communities between 1929 and 1938. He was the first dental officer in the U.S. Public Service assigned to the Coast Guard Cutter Northland's cruise area of the Bering Sea and Alaska Arctic regions. During his trips, Waugh compiled data on the teeth, mouth, and diet of Indigenous communities. In addition, he took many photographs and films of both dental subjects and Indigenous communities. In 1936, Waugh was appointed to a position with the Alaska Health Service by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior via the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. This position allowed him to further his studies of tooth decay throughout Alaska and the Bering Sea region. Waugh's 1937 expedition included three dentists, a physician and a nurse, and involved extensive air travel in small planes. Waugh spent the remainder of his professional career at Columbia University, where he acted as Chief of Orthodontia and Director of the Department of Orthodontics. Waugh continued to be active in professional organizations after his retirement.

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