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86 Total Pages 55 Contributing Members

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) records – Denver, CO: General Material, 1944

Help us transcribe “Denver, CO: General Material, 1944” (Box 1, Folder 6) from the Records of the National Congress of American Indians. These documents are part of NCAI’s founding documentation which can be found in Series 1: Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences of the NCAI records. NCAI was established in 1944 when close to 80 delegates from 50 tribes and associations in 27 states came together in Denver, Colorado to establish the National Congress of American Indians at the Constitutional Convention. Founded in response to the emerging threat of termination, the founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights. The Founders also committed to the betterment of the quality of life of Native people. To this day, protecting these inherent and legal rights remains the primary focus of NCAI.

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32 Total Pages 33 Contributing Members

Alice Cunningham Fletcher Papers- Fletcher to La Flesche Box: 5A, 1913-21

Alice Cunningham Fletcher (1838-1923), was an ethnologist and collaborator with the Peabody Museum of Harvard, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. A pioneer in a field dominated by men, she was one of the first female ethnologists to conduct fieldwork among the Omaha, Nez Perce, Winnebago and Sioux Indian tribes. Fletcher worked closely with Francis La Flesche, an Omaha Indian and fellow ethnologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. Because of their close personal and professional relationship, much of their research materials and correspondence are housed together in the National Anthropological Archives.

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47 Total Pages 17 Contributing Members

Report on the forestry, elevation, rainfall, and drainage of the Colorado Valley, October 31, 1877

In 1877, Lt. August G. Tassin of the 12th U.S. Infantry detailed the Colorado Valley's features, such as forestry, weather, and various native populations. Help us transcribe this report to learn more about the Camp Mohave area and the Mohave population.

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85 Total Pages 46 Contributing Members

Leuman Maurice Waugh collection - Correspondence, 1924

Help us transcribe “Correspondence, 1924” (Box 2, Folder 4) from the Leuman Maurice Waugh Collection! Leuman Maurice Waugh (1877-1972) was a dentist who studied and treated Indigenous populations in the Bering Sea and Alaska Arctic regions. Waugh received his D.D.S. from the University of Buffalo in 1900. Waugh married Helen "Esty" Marshall, and had a son, Donald (also a dentist), and a daughter, Dorothy. Over the course of five summers, Waugh privately carried out a Labrador study between 1921 and 1927. In 1929, Waugh volunteered to undertake Alaskan studies on dental health research among the Inuit for the U.S. Public Health Service, which appointed Waugh Dental Director (Reserve). While collaborating with the U.S. Public Health Service, Waugh studied twelve Alaskan Inuit communities between 1929 and 1938. He was the first dental officer in the U.S. Public Service assigned to the Coast Guard Cutter Northland's cruise area of the Bering Sea and Alaska Arctic regions. During his trips, Waugh compiled data on the teeth, mouth, and diet of Indigenous communities. In addition, he took many photographs and films of both dental subjects and Indigenous communities. In 1936, Waugh was appointed to a position with the Alaska Health Service by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior via the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. This position allowed him to further his studies of tooth decay throughout Alaska and the Bering Sea region. Waugh's 1937 expedition included three dentists, a physician and a nurse, and involved extensive air travel in small planes. Waugh spent the remainder of his professional career at Columbia University, where he acted as Chief of Orthodontia and Director of the Department of Orthodontics. Waugh continued to be active in professional organizations after his retirement.

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71 Total Pages 54 Contributing Members

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) records – Santa Fe, NM: General Material, 1947

Help us transcribe “Santa Fe, NM: General Material, 1947” (Box 2, Folder 3) from the Records of the National Congress of American Indians. These documents can be found in Series 1: Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences of the NCAI records. NCAI was established in 1944 when close to 80 delegates from 50 tribes and associations in 27 states came together in Denver, Colorado to establish the National Congress of American Indians at the Constitutional Convention. Founded in response to the emerging threat of termination, the founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights. The Founders also committed to the betterment of the quality of life of Native people. To this day, protecting these inherent and legal rights remains the primary focus of NCAI.

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83 Total Pages 25 Contributing Members

H. Arlo Nimmo Papers - Songs, Tenes Tenes, Box 9

The papers of H. Arlo Nimmo document his field research among the Bajau (also known as Sama Dilaut) in Tawi-Tawi Province in the southern Philippines in 1963, 1965-1967, 1977, 1982, and 1997. The collection consists of correspondence, field journals, censuses, genealogies, kinship charts, transcripts of songs, unpublished manuscripts, card files, photographs, sound recordings, and maps. Nimmo's initial research focused on social change, but he collected data about other aspects of Bajau culture, including social organization, kinship, religion, fishing, boats, boat-building, art, and music. Help us transcribe the series of Bajau songs that Nimmo recorded and translated to make this material searchable and more accessible for researchers around the world. Unlike the Binua or Lia-Lia, Tenes-Tenes songs are sung widely by children, teenagers, and some adults and don't focus on any topic, but rather consist of whatever the singer is thinking about at the time. Please note that this material may be in English and/or other languages of the Malayo-Polynesian language family.

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80 Total Pages 54 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - Grace Nicholson: Pomo Indian Creation Myths

Help us transcribe “Grace Nicholson: Pomo Indian Creation Myths” (Box 262A, Folder 5) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. The Pomo myths were originally written by William Benson (Pomo) in his Native language and shared with Grace Nicholson. William Benson (Pomo) was a renowned basket maker born in Clear Lake, California. William and his wife Mary Knight Benson (Pomo) found artistic and commercial success weaving traditional Pomo baskets. They traveled widely, exhibiting their baskets, and developing relationships with art collectors, such as Grace Nicholson. Grace Nicholson was an art collector dealer who specialized in Native American and Asian arts and crafts. She moved to California following her parents and grandparents death, in 1901 and was soon purchasing Native American baskets and other artifacts in association with Carrol S. Hartman. Nicholson kept extensive diaries and notes on her buying trips through Native American territory, especially of the Karok, Klamath, and Pomo communities. Her notes included Native American legends, folklore, vocabulary, tribal festivals, basket making, the art trade, and living conditions. Native American artists with whom Nicholson established long-term business and personal connections included Pomo basket weaver Mary Benson (1878-1930) and her husband William Benson (1862-1937), as well as Elizabeth Hickox (1875-1947) of the Karuk tribe.

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67 Total Pages 46 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - George Pepper: Correspondence, 1915-1918

Help us transcribe “George Pepper: Correspondence, 1915-1918” (Box 266, Folder 12) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. Correspondents include: Richard Van Vredenburgh, Theodoor de Booy, Charles Heuser, J. Walter Fewkes, George Gustav Heye, Bennett Young, Samuel G. Tate, George Payne, Otto B. Giers, Francis LaFlesche, Clarence B. Moore, G.L. Berg, William Curtis Farabee, F.W. Skiff, Charles Furlong, V.T. Hammer, James B. Ford, P.E. Goddard, Fred E. Sander, Edgar L. Hewett, J.E. Standley, Henry D. Paxson, John W. Harrington, Frederick W. Hodge, F.W. Waugh, William J. Seever, Elliot E. Haaseman, V. May White, Henry G. Bayer, Benjamin Talbot Babbitt Hyde, W.J. MacKAy, Clark Wissler.

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88 Total Pages 64 Contributing Members

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) records – St. Paul, MN: General Material, 1951

Help us transcribe “St. Paul, MN: General Material, 1951” (Box 3, Folder 3) from the Records of the National Congress of American Indians. These documents can be found in Series 1: Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences of the NCAI records. NCAI was established in 1944 when close to 80 delegates from 50 tribes and associations in 27 states came together in Denver, Colorado to establish the National Congress of American Indians at the Constitutional Convention. Founded in response to the emerging threat of termination, the founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights. The Founders also committed to the betterment of the quality of life of Native people. To this day, protecting these inherent and legal rights remains the primary focus of NCAI.

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50 Total Pages 29 Contributing Members

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) records – Rapid City, SD: General Correspondence, 1949

Help us transcribe “Rapid City, SD: General Correspondence, 1949” (Box 2, Folder 10) from the Records of the National Congress of American Indians. These documents can be found in Series 1: Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences of the NCAI records. NCAI was established in 1944 when close to 80 delegates from 50 tribes and associations in 27 states came together in Denver, Colorado to establish the National Congress of American Indians at the Constitutional Convention. Founded in response to the emerging threat of termination, the founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights. The Founders also committed to the betterment of the quality of life of Native people. To this day, protecting these inherent and legal rights remains the primary focus of NCAI.

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