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167 Total Pages 29 Contributing Members

Alice Cunningham Fletcher Papers- Correspondence Box 1, 1884-85

Alice Cunningham Fletcher (1838-1923), was an ethnologist and collaborator with the Peabody Museum of Harvard, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. A pioneer in a field dominated by men, she was one of the first female ethnologists to conduct fieldwork among the Omaha, Nez Perce, Winnebago and Sioux Indian tribes. Fletcher worked closely with Francis La Flesche, an Omaha Indian and fellow ethnologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. Because of their close personal and professional relationship, much of their research materials and correspondence are housed together in the National Anthropological Archives.

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61 Total Pages 48 Contributing Members

Oneida: MS 377: Oneida vocabulary, verb conjugations, and the Lord's Prayer in Oneida 1881

Created by Erminnie A. Smith and collected by John Napoleon Brinton Hewitt, this manuscript was recorded in the schedule of John Wesley Powell's "Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages, 1880." It is in Hewitt's handwriting, except for the title page. Rev. Cornelius, "a half breed Oneida," provided translation for this manuscript.

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148 Total Pages 61 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - George Pepper: Correspondence, Nov-Dec 1905

Help us transcribe “George Pepper: Correspondence, Nov-Dec 1905” (Box 266, Folder 7) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. George Hubbard Pepper (1873-1924) was instrumental in the creation of the Heye Museum collection, later the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Pepper, an archaeologist and ethnographer specializing in the study of the American Southwest, led several excavations to Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon with the American Museum of Natural History (Hyde Exploring Expeditions) previous to meeting George Heye in 1904. Well connected within the world of American archaeology, Pepper helped Heye professionalize his museum practices in addition to leading expeditions for the MAI to Ecuador, Mexico, Georgia and the American Southwest. As a co-founder of the American Anthropological Association Pepper’s correspondence includes communications with many prominent collectors, archaeologists and anthropologists of the early 20th century.

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131 Total Pages 28 Contributing Members

Alice Cunningham Fletcher Papers- Fletcher to La Flesche Box: 5A, 1895, 1899, 1905

Alice Cunningham Fletcher (1838-1923), was an ethnologist and collaborator with the Peabody Museum of Harvard, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. A pioneer in a field dominated by men, she was one of the first female ethnologists to conduct fieldwork among the Omaha, Nez Perce, Winnebago and Sioux Indian tribes. Fletcher worked closely with Francis La Flesche, an Omaha Indian and fellow ethnologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. Because of their close personal and professional relationship, much of their research materials and correspondence are housed together in the National Anthropological Archives.

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108 Total Pages 63 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - M.R. Harrington: Correspondence, General, 1902-1926

Help us transcribe "M.R. Harrington: Correspondence, General, 1902-1926” (Box 231, Folder 12) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. Mark Raymond, Harrington (1882-1971) was a prominent twentieth-century anthropologist who worked for many anthropological museums including Harvard University’s Peabody Museum, the American Museum of Natural History in New York, the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation (the predecessor to the National Museum of the American Indian or NMAI), Philadelphia’s University Museum, and later, from 1928 until his retirement in 1966, the Southwest Museum in Los Angeles.

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90 Total Pages 69 Contributing Members

Leuman Maurice Waugh collection - Correspondence with Alaska Survey Data and Expedition Logistics, 1934

Help us transcribe “Correspondence with Alaska Survey Data and Expedition Logistics, 1934” (Box 3, Folder 2) from the Leuman Maurice Waugh Collection! Leuman Maurice Waugh (1877-1972) was a dentist who studied and treated Indigenous populations in the Bering Sea and Alaska Arctic regions. Waugh received his D.D.S. from the University of Buffalo in 1900. Waugh married Helen "Esty" Marshall, and had a son, Donald (also a dentist), and a daughter, Dorothy. Over the course of five summers, Waugh privately carried out a Labrador study between 1921 and 1927. In 1929, Waugh volunteered to undertake Alaskan studies on dental health research among the Inuit for the U.S. Public Health Service, which appointed Waugh Dental Director (Reserve). While collaborating with the U.S. Public Health Service, Waugh studied twelve Alaskan Inuit communities between 1929 and 1938. He was the first dental officer in the U.S. Public Service assigned to the Coast Guard Cutter Northland's cruise area of the Bering Sea and Alaska Arctic regions. During his trips, Waugh compiled data on the teeth, mouth, and diet of Indigenous communities. In addition, he took many photographs and films of both dental subjects and Indigenous communities. In 1936, Waugh was appointed to a position with the Alaska Health Service by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior via the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. This position allowed him to further his studies of tooth decay throughout Alaska and the Bering Sea region. Waugh's 1937 expedition included three dentists, a physician and a nurse, and involved extensive air travel in small planes. Waugh spent the remainder of his professional career at Columbia University, where he acted as Chief of Orthodontia and Director of the Department of Orthodontics. Waugh continued to be active in professional organizations after his retirement.

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152 Total Pages 79 Contributing Members

Leuman Maurice Waugh collection - Correspondence, 1930

Help us transcribe “Correspondence, 1930” (Box 2, Folder 10) from the Leuman Maurice Waugh Collection! Leuman Maurice Waugh (1877-1972) was a dentist who studied and treated Indigenous populations in the Bering Sea and Alaska Arctic regions. Waugh received his D.D.S. from the University of Buffalo in 1900. Waugh married Helen "Esty" Marshall, and had a son, Donald (also a dentist), and a daughter, Dorothy. Over the course of five summers, Waugh privately carried out a Labrador study between 1921 and 1927. In 1929, Waugh volunteered to undertake Alaskan studies on dental health research among the Inuit for the U.S. Public Health Service, which appointed Waugh Dental Director (Reserve). While collaborating with the U.S. Public Health Service, Waugh studied twelve Alaskan Inuit communities between 1929 and 1938. He was the first dental officer in the U.S. Public Service assigned to the Coast Guard Cutter Northland's cruise area of the Bering Sea and Alaska Arctic regions. During his trips, Waugh compiled data on the teeth, mouth, and diet of Indigenous communities. In addition, he took many photographs and films of both dental subjects and Indigenous communities. In 1936, Waugh was appointed to a position with the Alaska Health Service by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior via the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. This position allowed him to further his studies of tooth decay throughout Alaska and the Bering Sea region. Waugh's 1937 expedition included three dentists, a physician and a nurse, and involved extensive air travel in small planes. Waugh spent the remainder of his professional career at Columbia University, where he acted as Chief of Orthodontia and Director of the Department of Orthodontics. Waugh continued to be active in professional organizations after his retirement.

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63 Total Pages 49 Contributing Members

Collections of the United States South Sea Surveying and Exploring Expedition 1838, 9, 40, 41 & 42. By T. R. Peale, U. S. Patent Office, 1846

These papers contain a catalogue of over 2500 ethnological items discovered during the United States South Sea Surveying and Exploring Expedition. Discover the tools and daily items used by Hawaiians and Fijians as you transcribe the lists.

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116 Total Pages 86 Contributing Members

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) records – St. Paul, MN: Proceedings, 1951

Help us transcribe “St. Paul, MN: Proceedings, 1951” (Box 3, Folder 5) from the Records of the National Congress of American Indians. These documents can be found in Series 1: Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences of the NCAI records. NCAI was established in 1944 when close to 80 delegates from 50 tribes and associations in 27 states came together in Denver, Colorado to establish the National Congress of American Indians at the Constitutional Convention. Founded in response to the emerging threat of termination, the founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights. The Founders also committed to the betterment of the quality of life of Native people. To this day, protecting these inherent and legal rights remains the primary focus of NCAI.

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108 Total Pages 84 Contributing Members

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) records – Phoenix, AZ: Program, 1953

Help us transcribe “Phoenix, AZ: Program, 1953” (Box 4, Folder 6) from the Records of the National Congress of American Indians. These documents can be found in Series 1: Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences of the NCAI records. NCAI was established in 1944 when close to 80 delegates from 50 tribes and associations in 27 states came together in Denver, Colorado to establish the National Congress of American Indians at the Constitutional Convention. Founded in response to the emerging threat of termination, the founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights. The Founders also committed to the betterment of the quality of life of Native people. To this day, protecting these inherent and legal rights remains the primary focus of NCAI.

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