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88 Total Pages 71 Contributing Members

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) records – Bellingham, WA: Proceedings, 1950

Help us transcribe “Bellingham, WA: Proceedings, 1950” (Box 3, Folder 2) from the Records of the National Congress of American Indians. These documents can be found in Series 1: Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences of the NCAI records. NCAI was established in 1944 when close to 80 delegates from 50 tribes and associations in 27 states came together in Denver, Colorado to establish the National Congress of American Indians at the Constitutional Convention. Founded in response to the emerging threat of termination, the founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights. The Founders also committed to the betterment of the quality of life of Native people. To this day, protecting these inherent and legal rights remains the primary focus of NCAI.

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102 Total Pages 72 Contributing Members

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) records – Oklahoma City, OK: General Material, 1946

Help us transcribe “Oklahoma City, OK: General Material, 1946” (Box 1, Folder 13) from the Records of the National Congress of American Indians. These documents can be found in Series 1: Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences of the NCAI records. NCAI was established in 1944 when close to 80 delegates from 50 tribes and associations in 27 states came together in Denver, Colorado to establish the National Congress of American Indians at the Constitutional Convention. Founded in response to the emerging threat of termination, the founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights. The Founders also committed to the betterment of the quality of life of Native people. To this day, protecting these inherent and legal rights remains the primary focus of NCAI.

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19 Total Pages 57 Contributing Members

Cultural Conservation Narrative Stage: Cowboy continued; Mayan Indian Culture in Guatemala; Native Hawaiian Culture: Gospel

Cultural conservation had been an underlying, if implicit, principle of the Festival of American Folklife since its beginning in 1967. In 1985 the Festival inaugurated a program that explicitly explored the question of cultural conservation from several points of view. The exhibit examined the kinds of contexts in which cultural conservation becomes a necessary concern; it documented efforts on the part of the keepers of tradition themselves to conserve their own culture in the face of a changing social and physical environment; and it explored the efforts of U.S. public cultural institutions to address the problem of cultural conservation. Festival visitors were invited to participate in and comment on the exhibit, the performances by keepers of these valued traditions, and the discussions of various aspects of this important topic. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. If you can identify the speakers, please do so using the format {SPEAKER NAME= "____" } if you cannot identify the speakers, please simply indicate when a different individual is speaking by inserting the "Speaker 1," "Speaker 2," etc. tags.

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88 Total Pages 32 Contributing Members

Indian School Diary, 1932, from the Olive Rush Papers

Illustrator, muralist, and art educator Olive Rush was born in Indiana in 1875. After several visits and exhibitions in New Mexico, Rush moved permanently to Santa Fe in 1920. She established a studio and home in an adobe house on Canyon Road, which became a main thoroughfare of the Santa Fe artists' community. Rush's enthusiastic work in the 1930s with the young Pueblo artists is credited with helping to bring about a flourishing of Native American visual art in New Mexico. Rush continued to work with Native American artists throughout her life, and many of her associates went on to gain national reputations, including Harrison Begay, Awa-Tsireh, Pop Chalee, Pablita Valerde, and Ha-So-De (Narciso Abeyta). Help transcribe the diary Olive Rush kept in 1932, the year she was hired to teach at the Santa Fe Indian School.

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114 Total Pages 29 Contributing Members

Alice Cunningham Fletcher Papers- Correspondence Box 1, 1883

Alice Cunningham Fletcher (1838-1923), was an ethnologist and collaborator with the Peabody Museum of Harvard, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. A pioneer in a field dominated by men, she was one of the first female ethnologists to conduct fieldwork among the Omaha, Nez Perce, Winnebago and Sioux Indian tribes. Fletcher worked closely with Francis La Flesche, an Omaha Indian and fellow ethnologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. Because of their close personal and professional relationship, much of their research materials and correspondence are housed together in the National Anthropological Archives.

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76 Total Pages 67 Contributing Members

Leuman Maurice Waugh collection - Correspondence, 1929 (Part 2)

Help us transcribe “Correspondence, 1929” (Box 2, Folder 9) from the Leuman Maurice Waugh Collection! Leuman Maurice Waugh (1877-1972) was a dentist who studied and treated Indigenous populations in the Bering Sea and Alaska Arctic regions. Waugh received his D.D.S. from the University of Buffalo in 1900. Waugh married Helen "Esty" Marshall, and had a son, Donald (also a dentist), and a daughter, Dorothy. Over the course of five summers, Waugh privately carried out a Labrador study between 1921 and 1927. In 1929, Waugh volunteered to undertake Alaskan studies on dental health research among the Inuit for the U.S. Public Health Service, which appointed Waugh Dental Director (Reserve). While collaborating with the U.S. Public Health Service, Waugh studied twelve Alaskan Inuit communities between 1929 and 1938. He was the first dental officer in the U.S. Public Service assigned to the Coast Guard Cutter Northland's cruise area of the Bering Sea and Alaska Arctic regions. During his trips, Waugh compiled data on the teeth, mouth, and diet of Indigenous communities. In addition, he took many photographs and films of both dental subjects and Indigenous communities. In 1936, Waugh was appointed to a position with the Alaska Health Service by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior via the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. This position allowed him to further his studies of tooth decay throughout Alaska and the Bering Sea region. Waugh's 1937 expedition included three dentists, a physician and a nurse, and involved extensive air travel in small planes. Waugh spent the remainder of his professional career at Columbia University, where he acted as Chief of Orthodontia and Director of the Department of Orthodontics. Waugh continued to be active in professional organizations after his retirement.

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27 Total Pages 39 Contributing Members

Cultural Conservation Narrative Stage: Mayan Indian Culture in Guatemala; Afro-American Corn rowing; Federal Cylinder Project

Cultural conservation had been an underlying, if implicit, principle of the Festival of American Folklife since its beginning in 1967. In 1985 the Festival inaugurated a program that explicitly explored the question of cultural conservation from several points of view. The exhibit examined the kinds of contexts in which cultural conservation becomes a necessary concern; it documented efforts on the part of the keepers of tradition themselves to conserve their own culture in the face of a changing social and physical environment; and it explored the efforts of U.S. public cultural institutions to address the problem of cultural conservation. Festival visitors were invited to participate in and comment on the exhibit, the performances by keepers of these valued traditions, and the discussions of various aspects of this important topic. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. If you can identify the speakers, please do so using the format {SPEAKER NAME= "____" } if you cannot identify the speakers, please simply indicate when a different individual is speaking by inserting the "Speaker 1," "Speaker 2," etc. tags.

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92 Total Pages 69 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - M.R. Harrington: Correspondence, Professional, Hurst, 1923-1924

Help us transcribe "M.R. Harrington: Correspondence, Professional, Hurst, 1924-1925” (Box 232, Folder 14) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. Mark Raymond, Harrington (1882-1971) was a prominent twentieth-century anthropologist who worked for many anthropological museums including Harvard University’s Peabody Museum, the American Museum of Natural History in New York, the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation (the predecessor to the National Museum of the American Indian or NMAI), Philadelphia’s University Museum, and later, from 1928 until his retirement in 1966, the Southwest Museum in Los Angeles.

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101 Total Pages 75 Contributing Members

Leuman Maurice Waugh collection - Correspondence, 1929 (Part 1)

Help us transcribe “Correspondence, 1929” (Box 2, Folder 8) from the Leuman Maurice Waugh Collection! Leuman Maurice Waugh (1877-1972) was a dentist who studied and treated Indigenous populations in the Bering Sea and Alaska Arctic regions. Waugh received his D.D.S. from the University of Buffalo in 1900. Waugh married Helen "Esty" Marshall, and had a son, Donald (also a dentist), and a daughter, Dorothy. Over the course of five summers, Waugh privately carried out a Labrador study between 1921 and 1927. In 1929, Waugh volunteered to undertake Alaskan studies on dental health research among the Inuit for the U.S. Public Health Service, which appointed Waugh Dental Director (Reserve). While collaborating with the U.S. Public Health Service, Waugh studied twelve Alaskan Inuit communities between 1929 and 1938. He was the first dental officer in the U.S. Public Service assigned to the Coast Guard Cutter Northland's cruise area of the Bering Sea and Alaska Arctic regions. During his trips, Waugh compiled data on the teeth, mouth, and diet of Indigenous communities. In addition, he took many photographs and films of both dental subjects and Indigenous communities. In 1936, Waugh was appointed to a position with the Alaska Health Service by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior via the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. This position allowed him to further his studies of tooth decay throughout Alaska and the Bering Sea region. Waugh's 1937 expedition included three dentists, a physician and a nurse, and involved extensive air travel in small planes. Waugh spent the remainder of his professional career at Columbia University, where he acted as Chief of Orthodontia and Director of the Department of Orthodontics. Waugh continued to be active in professional organizations after his retirement.

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77 Total Pages 17 Contributing Members

Menominee: MS 2797: Menominee linguistic notes and texts collected by Truman Michelson (1910)

Menominee linguistic notes and texts from Truman Michelson's fieldwork among the Menominee in Wisconsin in 1910. He obtained texts and Menominee names for various tribes from Judge Peroute, a priest of the Grand Medicine Society. Captain John V. Satterlee of the Indian Police at Keshena served as interpreter and also provided Michelson with linguistic information, such as vocabularies. The notes are in Menominee and English.

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