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94 Total Pages 41 Contributing Members

H. Arlo Nimmo Papers - Songs, Kata Kata Chants, Box 9

The papers of H. Arlo Nimmo document his field research among the Bajau (also known as Sama Dilaut) in Tawi-Tawi Province in the southern Philippines in 1963, 1965-1967, 1977, 1982, and 1997. The collection consists of correspondence, field journals, censuses, genealogies, kinship charts, transcripts of songs, unpublished manuscripts, card files, photographs, sound recordings, and maps. Nimmo's initial research focused on social change, but he collected data about other aspects of Bajau culture, including social organization, kinship, religion, fishing, boats, boat-building, art, and music. Help us transcribe the songs that Nimmo recorded and translated to make this material searchable and more accessible for researchers around the world. The kata-kata chants are sung because of a critical illness or crisis among the Bajau. They stem from an ancient tradition of chants in Samal, the Bajau language, and are known, and sung, by only a few older men within the community, who are paid for their services. Please note that this material may be in English and/or other languages of the Malayo-Polynesian language family.

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47 Total Pages 38 Contributing Members

Alice Cunningham Fletcher Papers- Omaha Allotment, Congressional Bills Box: 3, 1882-1925

Alice Cunningham Fletcher (1838-1923), was an ethnologist and collaborator with the Peabody Museum of Harvard, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. A pioneer in a field dominated by men, she was one of the first female ethnologists to conduct fieldwork among the Omaha, Nez Perce, Winnebago and Sioux Indian tribes. Fletcher worked closely with Francis La Flesche, an Omaha Indian and fellow ethnologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. Because of their close personal and professional relationship, much of their research materials and correspondence are housed together in the National Anthropological Archives.

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75 Total Pages 69 Contributing Members

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) records – Santa Fe, NM: Proceedings, 1947

Help us transcribe “Santa Fe, NM: Proceedings, 1947” (Box 2, Folder 2) from the Records of the National Congress of American Indians. These documents can be found in Series 1: Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences of the NCAI records. NCAI was established in 1944 when close to 80 delegates from 50 tribes and associations in 27 states came together in Denver, Colorado to establish the National Congress of American Indians at the Constitutional Convention. Founded in response to the emerging threat of termination, the founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights. The Founders also committed to the betterment of the quality of life of Native people. To this day, protecting these inherent and legal rights remains the primary focus of NCAI.

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69 Total Pages 28 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - Annual Reports, 1931-1934

Help us celebrate the 100 year anniversary of the founding of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation (NMAI's predecessor institution) by transcribing the museum's history! "Annual Reports, 1931-1934," (Box 404, Folder 5) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records document the early activities of the MAI-Heye Foundation under founding Director George Gustav Heye.

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78 Total Pages 51 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - M.R. Harrington: Correspondence, Professional A-G, 1917-1924

Help us transcribe "M.R. Harrington: Correspondence, Professional A-G, 1917-1924” (Box 232, Folder 13) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. Mark Raymond, Harrington (1882-1971) was a prominent twentieth-century anthropologist who worked for many anthropological museums including Harvard University’s Peabody Museum, the American Museum of Natural History in New York, the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation (the predecessor to the National Museum of the American Indian or NMAI), Philadelphia’s University Museum, and later, from 1928 until his retirement in 1966, the Southwest Museum in Los Angeles.

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89 Total Pages 51 Contributing Members

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) records – Denver, CO: Proceedings, 1948

Help us transcribe “Denver, CO: Proceedings, 1948” (Box 2, Folder 7) from the Records of the National Congress of American Indians. These documents can be found in Series 1: Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences of the NCAI records. NCAI was established in 1944 when close to 80 delegates from 50 tribes and associations in 27 states came together in Denver, Colorado to establish the National Congress of American Indians at the Constitutional Convention. Founded in response to the emerging threat of termination, the founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights. The Founders also committed to the betterment of the quality of life of Native people. To this day, protecting these inherent and legal rights remains the primary focus of NCAI.

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89 Total Pages 26 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - Annual Reports, 1942-1945

Help us celebrate the 100 year anniversary of the founding of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation (NMAI's predecessor institution) by transcribing the museum's history! "Annual Reports, 1942-1945," (Box 405, Folder 1) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records document the early activities of the MAI-Heye Foundation under founding Director George Gustav Heye.

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117 Total Pages 22 Contributing Members

Alice Cunningham Fletcher Papers- Correspondence Box: 2, 1901-02

Alice Cunningham Fletcher (1838-1923), was an ethnologist and collaborator with the Peabody Museum of Harvard, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. A pioneer in a field dominated by men, she was one of the first female ethnologists to conduct fieldwork among the Omaha, Nez Perce, Winnebago and Sioux Indian tribes. Fletcher worked closely with Francis La Flesche, an Omaha Indian and fellow ethnologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. Because of their close personal and professional relationship, much of their research materials and correspondence are housed together in the National Anthropological Archives.

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81 Total Pages 25 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - Annual Reports, 1938-1941

Help us celebrate the 100 year anniversary of the founding of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation (NMAI's predecessor institution) by transcribing the museum's history! "Annual Reports, 1938-1941," (Box 404, Folder 7) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records document the early activities of the MAI-Heye Foundation under founding Director George Gustav Heye.

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98 Total Pages 48 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - George Pepper: Correspondence, Mar-Apr 1905

Help us transcribe “George Pepper: Correspondence, Mar-Apr 1905” (Box 266, Folder 3) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. George Hubbard Pepper (1873-1924) was instrumental in the creation of the Heye Museum collection, later the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Pepper, an archaeologist and ethnographer specializing in the study of the American Southwest, led several excavations to Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon with the American Museum of Natural History (Hyde Exploring Expeditions) previous to meeting George Heye in 1904. Well connected within the world of American archaeology, Pepper helped Heye professionalize his museum practices in addition to leading expeditions for the MAI to Ecuador, Mexico, Georgia and the American Southwest. As a co-founder of the American Anthropological Association Pepper’s correspondence includes communications with many prominent collectors, archaeologists and anthropologists of the early 20th century.

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