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84 Total Pages 46 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - George Pepper: Correspondence, Sep 1904

Help us transcribe “George Pepper: Correspondence, Sep 1904” (Box 265, Folder 12) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. George Hubbard Pepper (1873-1924) was instrumental in the creation of the Heye Museum collection, later the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Pepper, an archaeologist and ethnographer specializing in the study of the American Southwest, led several excavations to Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon with the American Museum of Natural History (Hyde Exploring Expeditions) previous to meeting George Heye in 1904. Well connected within the world of American archaeology, Pepper helped Heye professionalize his museum practices in addition to leading expeditions for the MAI to Ecuador, Mexico, Georgia and the American Southwest. As a co-founder of the American Anthropological Association Pepper’s correspondence includes communications with many prominent collectors, archaeologists and anthropologists of the early 20th century.

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76 Total Pages 37 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - George Pepper: Correspondence, Sep 1905

Help us transcribe “George Pepper: Correspondence, Sep 1905” (Box 266, Folder 5) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. George Hubbard Pepper (1873-1924) was instrumental in the creation of the Heye Museum collection, later the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Pepper, an archaeologist and ethnographer specializing in the study of the American Southwest, led several excavations to Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon with the American Museum of Natural History (Hyde Exploring Expeditions) previous to meeting George Heye in 1904. Well connected within the world of American archaeology, Pepper helped Heye professionalize his museum practices in addition to leading expeditions for the MAI to Ecuador, Mexico, Georgia and the American Southwest. As a co-founder of the American Anthropological Association Pepper’s correspondence includes communications with many prominent collectors, archaeologists and anthropologists of the early 20th century.

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28 Total Pages 15 Contributing Members

Alice Cunningham Fletcher Papers- Correspondence Box 1, 1874, 1876-1879

Alice Cunningham Fletcher (1838-1923), was an ethnologist and collaborator with the Peabody Museum of Harvard, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. A pioneer in a field dominated by men, she was one of the first female ethnologists to conduct fieldwork among the Omaha, Nez Perce, Winnebago and Sioux Indian tribes. Fletcher worked closely with Francis La Flesche, an Omaha Indian and fellow ethnologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. Because of their close personal and professional relationship, much of their research materials and correspondence are housed together in the National Anthropological Archives.

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16 Total Pages 41 Contributing Members

Cultural Conservation Narrative Stage: Cowboys continued; Native American & Hawaiian Music; NEA Folk Arts Program: Kmhmu

Cultural conservation had been an underlying, if implicit, principle of the Festival of American Folklife since its beginning in 1967. In 1985 the Festival inaugurated a program that explicitly explored the question of cultural conservation from several points of view. The exhibit examined the kinds of contexts in which cultural conservation becomes a necessary concern; it documented efforts on the part of the keepers of tradition themselves to conserve their own culture in the face of a changing social and physical environment; and it explored the efforts of U.S. public cultural institutions to address the problem of cultural conservation. Festival visitors were invited to participate in and comment on the exhibit, the performances by keepers of these valued traditions, and the discussions of various aspects of this important topic. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. If you can identify the speakers, please do so using the format {SPEAKER NAME= "____" } if you cannot identify the speakers, please simply indicate when a different individual is speaking by inserting the "Speaker 1," "Speaker 2," etc. tags.

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92 Total Pages 70 Contributing Members

Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation - Grace Nicholson: Notes and Photos, 1903-1968

Help us transcribe “Grace Nicholson: Notes and Photos, 1903-1968” (Box 262A, Folder 4) from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation Records. This project includes photographs, please review the General Instructions Page for guidance on transcribing images. Grace Nicholson was an art collector dealer who specialized in Native American and Asian arts and crafts. She moved to California following her parents and grandparents death, in 1901 and was soon purchasing Native American baskets and other artifacts in association with Carrol S. Hartman. Nicholson kept extensive diaries and notes on her buying trips through Native American territory, especially of the Karok, Klamath, and Pomo communities. Her notes included Native American legends, folklore, vocabulary, tribal festivals, basket making, the art trade, and living conditions. Native American artists with whom Nicholson established long-term business and personal connections included Pomo basket weaver Mary Benson (1878-1930) and her husband William Benson (1862-1937), as well as Elizabeth Hickox (1875-1947) of the Karuk tribe. Throughout her collecting career, Nicholson maintained a correspondence with George Heye selling and donating collections to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation from 1916 until her death in 1948. In 1968, Maxwell donated Nicholson's papers and photographs to The Huntington Library and sold Nicholson's collection of baskets made by the Bensons, as well as a large collection of correspondence and myths from William Benson, to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, of New York City (now the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution).

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30 Total Pages 25 Contributing Members

Cultural Conservation Narrative Stage: Conserving Traditional Crafts: Gospel; Fairfield Four; Federal Cylinder Project

Cultural conservation had been an underlying, if implicit, principle of the Festival of American Folklife since its beginning in 1967. In 1985 the Festival inaugurated a program that explicitly explored the question of cultural conservation from several points of view. The exhibit examined the kinds of contexts in which cultural conservation becomes a necessary concern; it documented efforts on the part of the keepers of tradition themselves to conserve their own culture in the face of a changing social and physical environment; and it explored the efforts of U.S. public cultural institutions to address the problem of cultural conservation. Festival visitors were invited to participate in and comment on the exhibit, the performances by keepers of these valued traditions, and the discussions of various aspects of this important topic. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. If you can identify the speakers, please do so using the format {SPEAKER NAME= "____" } if you cannot identify the speakers, please simply indicate when a different individual is speaking by inserting the "Speaker 1," "Speaker 2," etc. tags.

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41 Total Pages 18 Contributing Members

Thomas Henry Tibbles papers - Standing Bear vs. Crook: Argument of G.M. Lambertson, 1879

Help us transcribe "Standing Bear vs. Crook: Argument of G.M. Lambertson, 1879" (Box 2, Folder 07) from the Thomas Henry Tibbles papers! Thomas Henry Tibbles (1840-1928) was as a journalist and lecturer on Indian rights from the 1870s until his death in 1928. His papers include articles, essays, correspondence, lectures and photographs. Of particular note are the documents related to his work on the Standing Bear (Ponca) vs. George Crook Habeas Corpus trial in 1879.

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65 Total Pages 38 Contributing Members

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) records – St. Paul, MN: Correspondence, 1951

Help us transcribe “St. Paul, MN: Correspondence, 1951” (Box 3, Folder 4) from the Records of the National Congress of American Indians. These documents can be found in Series 1: Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences of the NCAI records. NCAI was established in 1944 when close to 80 delegates from 50 tribes and associations in 27 states came together in Denver, Colorado to establish the National Congress of American Indians at the Constitutional Convention. Founded in response to the emerging threat of termination, the founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights. The Founders also committed to the betterment of the quality of life of Native people. To this day, protecting these inherent and legal rights remains the primary focus of NCAI.

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22 Total Pages 35 Contributing Members

Cultural Conservation Narrative Stage: Kmhmu Refugees from Laos: Conserving American Indian Culture

Cultural conservation had been an underlying, if implicit, principle of the Festival of American Folklife since its beginning in 1967. In 1985 the Festival inaugurated a program that explicitly explored the question of cultural conservation from several points of view. The exhibit examined the kinds of contexts in which cultural conservation becomes a necessary concern; it documented efforts on the part of the keepers of tradition themselves to conserve their own culture in the face of a changing social and physical environment; and it explored the efforts of U.S. public cultural institutions to address the problem of cultural conservation. Festival visitors were invited to participate in and comment on the exhibit, the performances by keepers of these valued traditions, and the discussions of various aspects of this important topic. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. If you can identify the speakers, please do so using the format {SPEAKER NAME= "____" } if you cannot identify the speakers, please simply indicate when a different individual is speaking by inserting the "Speaker 1," "Speaker 2," etc. tags.

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71 Total Pages 48 Contributing Members

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) records – Denver, CO: General Matters, 1952

Help us transcribe “Denver, CO: General Matters, 1952” (Box 3, Folder 10) from the Records of the National Congress of American Indians. These documents can be found in Series 1: Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences of the NCAI records. NCAI was established in 1944 when close to 80 delegates from 50 tribes and associations in 27 states came together in Denver, Colorado to establish the National Congress of American Indians at the Constitutional Convention. Founded in response to the emerging threat of termination, the founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights. The Founders also committed to the betterment of the quality of life of Native people. To this day, protecting these inherent and legal rights remains the primary focus of NCAI.

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