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For help transcribing audio collections, please visit our TC Sound instruction page, and learn more about the importance of TC Sound in the Smithsonian Collections Blog.

65% Complete

20 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Deaf Folklore: Deaf Theater: Kaleidoscope; Deaf Folklore Sampler JUN 26 1981

The 1981 Smithsonian Folklife Festival celebrated the skills and traditions of a cultural minority who, despite their large numbers, frequently pass unnoticed: deaf and hard of hearing Americans. In recognition of the International Year of Disabled Persons, deaf participants performed "signlore," told stories emerging from Deaf culture (often with a capital D), and discussed life and experiences growing up deaf. They taught workshops on American Sign Language, displayed homemade devices to substitute for alarm clocks and doorbells, and demonstrated standardized technology such as a TTY, a machine that allows deaf people to make phone calls. Deaf visitors were invited to share jokes, riddles, stories, or puns on videotape with Smithsonian researchers. These recordings were only recently preserved and previously were inaccessible due to their advanced age and format obsolescence. Transcription of their content will provide access- for the first time - to those hard of hearing, and increase our understanding of the history of accessibility in the United States. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. If you can identify the speakers, please do so using the format {SPEAKER NAME= "____" } if you cannot identify the speakers, please simply indicate when a different individual is speaking by inserting the "Speaker 1," "Speaker 2," etc. tags.

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75% Complete

20 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Deaf Folklore: Deaf Theater: Kaleidoscope: Moore, Jan de Lap, Hathaway, Jones, Schultz JUN 26 1981

The 1981 Smithsonian Folklife Festival celebrated the skills and traditions of a cultural minority who, despite their large numbers, frequently pass unnoticed: deaf and hard of hearing Americans. In recognition of the International Year of Disabled Persons, deaf participants performed "signlore," told stories emerging from Deaf culture (often with a capital D), and discussed life and experiences growing up deaf. They taught workshops on American Sign Language, displayed homemade devices to substitute for alarm clocks and doorbells, and demonstrated standardized technology such as a TTY, a machine that allows deaf people to make phone calls. Deaf visitors were invited to share jokes, riddles, stories, or puns on videotape with Smithsonian researchers. These recordings were only recently preserved and previously were inaccessible due to their advanced age and format obsolescence. Transcription of their content will provide access- for the first time - to those hard of hearing, and increase our understanding of the history of accessibility in the United States. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. If you can identify the speakers, please do so using the format {SPEAKER NAME= "____" } if you cannot identify the speakers, please simply indicate when a different individual is speaking by inserting the "Speaker 1," "Speaker 2," etc. tags.

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38% Complete

21 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Deaf Folklore: What is Deaf Folklore? JUN 26 1981

The 1981 Smithsonian Folklife Festival celebrated the skills and traditions of a cultural minority who, despite their large numbers, frequently pass unnoticed: deaf and hard of hearing Americans. In recognition of the International Year of Disabled Persons, deaf participants performed "signlore," told stories emerging from Deaf culture (often with a capital D), and discussed life and experiences growing up deaf. They taught workshops on American Sign Language, displayed homemade devices to substitute for alarm clocks and doorbells, and demonstrated standardized technology such as a TTY, a machine that allows deaf people to make phone calls. Deaf visitors were invited to share jokes, riddles, stories, or puns on videotape with Smithsonian researchers. These recordings were only recently preserved and previously were inaccessible due to their advanced age and format obsolescence. Transcription of their content will provide access- for the first time - to those hard of hearing, and increase our understanding of the history of accessibility in the United States. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. If you can identify the speakers, please do so using the format {SPEAKER NAME= "____" } if you cannot identify the speakers, please simply indicate when a different individual is speaking by inserting the "Speaker 1," "Speaker 2," etc. tags.

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15% Complete

19 Total Pages 13 Contributing Members

Helen C. Rountree Lecture to Anthropological Society of Washington, 1988 October 18-19, Side 2, Helen C. Rountree Papers

This is part one of a lecture given to the Anthropological Society of Washington by Helen Rountree, who was a professor at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. Rountree studied the history of the Virginia Tribes from the 17th century to the 21st century and is considered a leading expert on Pocahontas. Please be aware that this audio recording is a bit difficult to hear given the poor audio quality. Do the best you can, and reach out anytime for help! Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

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12 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Interview with Michael Asher, March 1981 - Part 1

Jan Butterfield was an art writer and critic of contemporary art who spent most of her career in California. She is best known for her writings on late twentieth century installation and craft artists, particularly those who worked in California and the American West. In Jan Butterfield’s papers at the Archives of American Art, there are 107 sound tape reels, 97 cassettes, and 1 video reel of her interviews. Jan Butterfield conducted this interview with conceptual artist and California Institute of the Arts professor Michael Asher (1943-2012) in March 1981.

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38% Complete

13 Total Pages 23 Contributing Members

Interview with Sam Gilliam, 1978 June 29

Art historian and critic Judith Wilson wrote about visual art and cultural politics for Ms. Magazine and in her academic career focused on African American art and black visual culture. Within Wilson’s papers at the Archives of American Art there are 97 sound cassette tapes and four CDs of interviews conducted with artists, their associates, and collectors for various writing projects. Judith Wilson conducted this interview with Washington, DC based Color Field painter and educator Sam Gilliam on June 29, 1978. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

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88% Complete

44 Total Pages 22 Contributing Members

Oral History, Gordon Ekholm, Side 1, Winter-Spring 1971, William C. Sturtevant Papers

This is a recording in a series of audio recordings by William Curtis Sturtevant, longtime Curator of North American Ethnology at the National Museum of Natural History. This is part three of an oral history conducted by Sturtevant and Shirley Gorenstein with fellow anthropologist and curator at the American Museum of Natural History, Gordon Ekholm. It was recorded May 25, 1971. Ekholm was an expert in pre-Columbian archeology of Mexico and Central America. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning..

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57% Complete

42 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

Oral History, Gordon Ekholm, Side 2, Part 1, Winter-Spring 1971, William C. Sturtevant Papers

This is a recording in a series of audio recordings by William Curtis Sturtevant, longtime Curator of North American Ethnology at the National Museum of Natural History. This is part one of an oral history conducted by Sturtevant and Shirley Gorenstein on March 30, 1971 with fellow anthropologist and curator at the American Museum of Natural History, Gordon Ekholm. Ekholm was an expert in pre-Columbian archeology of Mexico and Central America. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning..

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90% Complete

11 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

Peenemünde Interviews Project: Karl Heimburg 11/9/1989 (Tape 3 of 3) B

The collection consists of the oral history recordings and transcripts for the Peenemünde Interviews Project, which examined the development of the German Peenemünde complex from the early 1930s through World War II. This project constitutes one of several oral history projects conducted within the Department of Space History, NASM. The principal investigator for this project was Michael Neufeld and the following individuals were interviewed: Werner Dahm; Konrad Dannenberg; Walter Haeussermann; Karl Heimberg; Helmut Hoelzer; Fritz Mueller; Herman Oberth; Eberhard Rees (with Mrs. Rees); Gerhard Reisig; Arthur Rudolph; Bernhard Tessman (with Karl Heimburg); Georg von Tiesenhausen; and Walter Wiesman. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

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53% Complete

13 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Smithsonian Memories Project, 1996 – C. Booth

Following his retirement from a long military career between 1945 and 1968, Carvester Booth decided to take a vacation. He traveled to Washington, D.C, and went on a sightseeing tour of the Smithsonian museums. And there he remained for the next twenty-two years as a security officer. Booth really loved the Smithsonian. He began working for the National Air and Space Museum in 1976, the day before it opened, and protected various other museums on the National Mall. If you feel like a good listen and laugh, join a group of volunpeers in transcribing Booth’s interview from the 1996 Folklife Festival in which he recounts a typical day of an officer at the Smithsonian.

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