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500 Total Pages 28 Contributing Members

Acalypha accolades!

The Acalypha genus is one of the largest in the Euphorbiaceae. Just as we saw many Croton, Acalypha will be making an appearance in many sets.

Please contact Sylvia Orli, Department of Botany, or tweet us at @sylviaorli @TranscribeSI for any questions or comments about the transcriptions.

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500 Total Pages 25 Contributing Members

Acalypha accolades! Set 2

The Acalypha genus is one of the largest in the Euphorbiaceae. Just as we saw many Croton, Acalypha will be making an appearance in many sets.

Please contact Sylvia Orli, Department of Botany, or tweet us at @sylviaorli @TranscribeSI for any questions or comments about the transcriptions.

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18 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Alexander C. Anderson - Western Union Telegraph Expedition report, 1865

Travel the path of the Western Union Telegraph Expedition with this 1865 trip report by explorer and fur-trader Alexander Caulfield Anderson. Anderson's report, filed "on the country between the Fraser R[iver] and Stuart Lake" in British Columbia, details part of the path taken by the historic expedition to explore building a trans-Pacific communication system through Alaska and Asia. His report from the beginning of the expedition, in 1865, describes a path to follow, with notes on the terrain, the types of trees available on the route, and distances between towns and other geographic landmarks. Help transcribe Anderson's expedition report and join in on an incredible scientific exploration! You can also read the 1865 account of a fellow Telegraph Expedition traveler, William Healey Dall, previously transcribed by volunpeers!

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106 Total Pages 23 Contributing Members

Alexander Van Valen Diary, 1849-1850

Have you wondered what it was like to be part of the California Gold Rush? Go back to 1849 and join Alexander Van Valen where he starts off in New York, traveling by ship south down around the tip of South America and then north to San Francisco. You can be a part of this historic trip by helping us transcribe Van Valen's diary and follow his travels starting today.

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53 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Album 1 Panama, 1954

Planning to travel when you retire? Where would you go? Forty-two years after starting his science career in ornithology and avian paleontology, Wetmore retired from his position as Secretary of the Smithsonian to more fully devote himself to the science he loved. This photograph album documents Alexander Wetmore's work in Panama in 1954, including visits to the Canal Zone Biological Area and specimen collecting in Chiriqui together with Beatrice Thielen Wetmore and others. Join other digital volunteers in transcribing the captions in this album and see a wide range of topics including shorelines, forests and vegetation, volcano vistas, Panamanian staff and families, lodgings, and modes of transportation used.

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48 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Album, Panama, 1957, Vol. 1

Did you know that the 365 islands that make up the San Blas archipelago of Panama are largely uninhabited? The islands also lie outside the Atlantic hurricane region, leaving the environment undisturbed by natural disasters. These factors made the San Blas Islands a perfect place for a scientist like Alexander Wetmore to explore! Ornithologist and former Smithsonian Secretary Wetmore made an annual trip to Panama, to collect specimen and research for what would become his book, "The Birds of The Republic of Panama." On his 1957 expedition, Wetmore traveled to San Blas to study the native wildlife--documented in this photo album, alongside other locations throughout Panama. Sail off to the San Blas Islands and help transcribe the captions from this fascinating set of images!

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55 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Album, Panama, 1957, Vol. 2

Did you know that when the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama was established in 1923, it was just one small field station? In the decades since, the Smithsonian's Panama facilities have greatly expanded to conduct long-term biological studies and host hundreds of visiting scientists--including former Smithsonian Secretary Alexander Wetmore. Wetmore visited the Smithsonian's Panama field station as part of his annual trip to study the region's bird populations. This album contains photographs of Wetmore's work at the research station, at the beginning of its expansion throughout the 1940s-1980s. Help transcribe the image captions from this album and get a unique insight into the Smithsonian's international environmental research!

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13 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Field Notes, 1935-36

Did you know that much of the area now known as Shenandoah National Park--which spans nearly 80,000 acres of Northern Virginia--was still farmland when it was officially established as a National Park in 1936? Get insight to this National Park in transition with Alexander Wetmore's 1935-36 field notes from the Shenandoah Mountains. Wetmore, an ornithologist and future Smithsonian Secretary, was Assistant Secretary of the U.S. National Museum in 1935. Even with his administrative duties, Wetmore found time to conduct field research and observe birds throughout Virginia and West Virginia. Travel through the Shenandoah Mountains with Wetmore and join other digital volunteers in transcribing his field books!

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22 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Field Notes, February-August 1913

What kinds of birds would you expect to spot in the United States capitol? Find out with this set of bird observations taken by Alexander Wetmore--an ornithologist and conservationist who would serve as the sixth Smithsonian Secretary from 1945-1952. This collection of notes, taken in 1913, were made in the Washington, D.C. area while Wetmore was working as an assistant biologist for the US Department of Agriculture's Biological Survey bureau. Wetmore's journal includes entries made at Georgetown, the Francis Scott Key Bridge, Chesapeake Beach, and other locations in Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Join us in transcribing this set of field notes and learn more about United States wildlife!

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