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523 Total Pages 24 Contributing Members

"Where is the world is..?" Set 10

Come help us improve our digital records for the United States National Herbarium (US)! Please join us in our effort to transcribe the locality information for our difficult to decipher US Specimens. The records in this project are special cases in which the locality information requires some detective work. We'd like to ask for your help in digging a little deeper to find the Country and Territory/State/Province for each of these specimens sheets labels; see special instructions and examples here . Please contact Sylvia Orli, Department of Botany, for any questions or comments about the transcriptions. Note: Do not erase notes from other volunteers or staff; rather, leave existing comments and add your own.

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40 Total Pages 24 Contributing Members

#1757-#1975, Mary Agnes Chase expedition to Brazil, 1924-1925

Islands, Aqueducts, Bamboo, and Oxen – what will you discover through the annotated photographs of Mary Agnes Chase's expedition to Brazil in 1924-1925? Help us transcribe the set to learn more.

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57 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

A brief report on a trip to Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia, 1923-1924

How far would you go to study grasses? South American biodiversity held the interest of some United States botanists as early as the turn of the twentieth century. Harvard University and the New York Botanical Garden as well as the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) saw fit to send Alfred Spear Hitchcock (1865-1935), USDA systematic agrostologist and Smithsonian custodian of grasses to northern South America to study the grazing industry there in 1923. This brief typescript report includes a descriptions of Hitchcock's time there together with photographs visually documenting the expedition. Please help us transcribe Hitchcock's report and learn his thoughts concerning the grazing industries of three different countries.

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500 Total Pages 45 Contributing Members

A Cornucopia of Alchornea

Alchornea (Euphorbiaceae) has many uses. According to Wikipedia, for centuries the indigenous peoples of the Amazon have used the bark and leaves of iporuru (Alchornea castaneifolia) for many different purposes and prepared it in many different ways. The Alchornea castaneifolia plant commonly is used with other plants during shamanistic training and, sometimes is an ingredient in ayahuasca (a hallucinogenic, multi-herb decoction used by South American shamans).

Please contact Sylvia Orli, Department of Botany, or tweet us at @sylviaorli @TranscribeSI for any questions or comments about the transcriptions.

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500 Total Pages 37 Contributing Members

A Feast of Crotons - complete

You may be asking, what is there to do during the holiday season? The answer is obvious. Transcribe Croton records of course! And Botanists at the Smithsonian are grateful as always for your help. Together we will help conserve the plants of the world.

Please contact Sylvia Orli, Department of Botany, or tweet us at @sylviaorli @TranscribeSI for any questions or comments about the transcriptions.

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500 Total Pages 31 Contributing Members

A Luxuriance of Croton! - complete

Join us in transcribing the, yes, you guessed it, Croton, an extensive flowering genus fom the Euphorbiaceae, or Spurge, family. Here's another interesting fact: According to Wikipedia, in the Amazon the red latex from the species Croton lechleri, known as Sangre de Drago (Dragon's blood), is used as a "liquid bandage", as well as for other medicinal purposes, by native peoples.
Please contact Sylvia Orli, Department of Botany, for any questions or comments about the transcriptions and thanks to all of you for your help!

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500 Total Pages 28 Contributing Members

A LUXURIANCE OF CROTON! Set 2 - complete

Join us in transcribing the, yes, you guessed it, Croton, an extensive flowering genus fom the Euphorbiaceae, or Spurge, family. Here's another interesting fact: According to Wikipedia, Cascarilla (Croton eluteria) bark is used to flavour the liqueurs Campari and Vermouth. Please contact Sylvia Orli, Department of Botany, for any questions or comments about the transcriptions and thanks to all of you for your help!

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500 Total Pages 45 Contributing Members

A LUXURIANCE OF CROTON! Set 3 - complete

Join us in transcribing the, yes, you guessed it, Croton, an extensive flowering genus fom the Euphorbiaceae, or Spurge, family. Here's another interesting fact: According to Wikipedia, Croton seeds can be made in to an oil that is used in herbal medicine as a violent purgative. Nowadays, it is considered unsafe and it is no longer listed in the pharmacopeias of many countries. Please contact Sylvia Orli, Department of Botany, for any questions or comments about the transcriptions and thanks to all of you for your help!

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500 Total Pages 23 Contributing Members

A Ponderance of Aporosa

Like many plants in the Euphorbiaceae, Aporosa can be used for medicinal purposes.

Please contact Sylvia Orli, Department of Botany, or tweet us at @sylviaorli @TranscribeSI for any questions or comments about the transcriptions.

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100% Complete

500 Total Pages 23 Contributing Members

A Ponderance of Aporosa

Like many plants in the Euphorbiaceae, Aporosa can be used for medicinal purposes.

Please contact Sylvia Orli, Department of Botany, or tweet us at @sylviaorli @TranscribeSI for any questions or comments about the transcriptions.

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