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169 Total Pages 20 Contributing Members

Charles Lang Freer's letters to Frank Hecker during foreign travels, 1894-1895

Wild parties with James McNeill Whistler in Paris, banquets with maharajas, and what he considered ?going native? in a remote Japanese village - Detroit industrialist and museum founder Charles Lang Freer made his first extended tour overseas between September 1894 and August 1895. Although Freer did not keep a travel journal, his extensive letters to his friend and business partner Frank Hecker provide a vivid day by day description of his travels through Italy, France, Sri Lanka, India and Japan.

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219 Total Pages 21 Contributing Members

Charles Lang Freer's letters to Frank Hecker during foreign travels, 1899-1903

Mystic visions on a storm tossed ship; luxurious respite on a Mediterranean island, and James McNeill Whistler's final days. Between 1899 and 1903, Charles Lang Freer took numerous trips to Europe, to develop his art collection, to spend time at his villa on Capri, and to meet with his most admired artist, J. M. Whistler. This is the second installment of Freer's overseas travels, as related through the numerous letters to his friend and business partner Frank Hecker.

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283 Total Pages 34 Contributing Members

Charles Lang Freer's letters to Frank Hecker during foreign travels, 1904-1908

Charles Lang Freer's letters from abroad to his business partner Frank Hecker. Includes his extensive travels in Europe and the Middle East and Asia. This was Freer's first travel in Southeast Asia, and a long period of visits to Sri Lankan historical sites.

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117 Total Pages 16 Contributing Members

Charles Lang Freer's letters to Frank Hecker during foreign travels, 1909

"Dear Colonel Hecker:-" Charles Lang Freer's letters from abroad to his business partner Frank Hecker feature detailed accounts of locations, art, and other observations. Join this project from the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery to learn more about Freer's extensive travels in the Middle East and Asia, including his first major foray into China.

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63 Total Pages 49 Contributing Members

Collections of the United States South Sea Surveying and Exploring Expedition 1838, 9, 40, 41 & 42. By T. R. Peale, U. S. Patent Office, 1846

These papers contain a catalogue of over 2500 ethnological items discovered during the United States South Sea Surveying and Exploring Expedition. Discover the tools and daily items used by Hawaiians and Fijians as you transcribe the lists.

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10 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

Copies by Swan of drawings by Haida Indians of mythological animals, some dated 1873

The Haida Indian drawings, reproduced from 1873-1876, demonstrate mythological and great animals. What will you learn about the population from Queen Charlotte's Islands as you transcribe the notes accompanying these images?

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21 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Deaf Folklore: Deaf in a Hearing World Workshop- William Ennis, Barbara Kannapell JUN 25 1981

The 1981 Smithsonian Folklife Festival celebrated the skills and traditions of a cultural minority who, despite their large numbers, frequently pass unnoticed: deaf and hard of hearing Americans. In recognition of the International Year of Disabled Persons, deaf participants performed "signlore," told stories emerging from Deaf culture (often with a capital D), and discussed life and experiences growing up deaf. They taught workshops on American Sign Language, displayed homemade devices to substitute for alarm clocks and doorbells, and demonstrated standardized technology such as a TTY, a machine that allows deaf people to make phone calls. Deaf visitors were invited to share jokes, riddles, stories, or puns on videotape with Smithsonian researchers. These recordings were only recently preserved and previously were inaccessible due to their advanced age and format obsolescence. Transcription of their content will provide access- for the first time - to those hard of hearing, and increase our understanding of the history of accessibility in the United States. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. If you can identify the speakers, please do so using the format {SPEAKER NAME= "____" } if you cannot identify the speakers, please simply indicate when a different individual is speaking by inserting the "Speaker 1," "Speaker 2," etc. tags. For more information about the programs in these recordings, please look at the audio log sheets describing the content and speakers at each presentation.

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21 Total Pages 15 Contributing Members

Deaf Folklore: Deaf in the Hearing World Workshop JUN 24 1981

The 1981 Smithsonian Folklife Festival celebrated the skills and traditions of a cultural minority who, despite their large numbers, frequently pass unnoticed: deaf and hard of hearing Americans. In recognition of the International Year of Disabled Persons, deaf participants performed "signlore," told stories emerging from Deaf culture (often with a capital D), and discussed life and experiences growing up deaf. They taught workshops on American Sign Language, displayed homemade devices to substitute for alarm clocks and doorbells, and demonstrated standardized technology such as a TTY, a machine that allows deaf people to make phone calls. Deaf visitors were invited to share jokes, riddles, stories, or puns on videotape with Smithsonian researchers. These recordings were only recently preserved and previously were inaccessible due to their advanced age and format obsolescence. Transcription of their content will provide access- for the first time - to those hard of hearing, and increase our understanding of the history of accessibility in the United States. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. If you can identify the speakers, please do so using the format {SPEAKER NAME= "____" } if you cannot identify the speakers, please simply indicate when a different individual is speaking by inserting the "Speaker 1," "Speaker 2," etc. tags. For more information about the programs in these recordings, please look at the audio log sheets describing the content and speakers at each presentation.

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20 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

Deaf Folklore: Deaf Theater: Kaleidoscope; Deaf Folklore Sampler JUN 26 1981

The 1981 Smithsonian Folklife Festival celebrated the skills and traditions of a cultural minority who, despite their large numbers, frequently pass unnoticed: deaf and hard of hearing Americans. In recognition of the International Year of Disabled Persons, deaf participants performed "signlore," told stories emerging from Deaf culture (often with a capital D), and discussed life and experiences growing up deaf. They taught workshops on American Sign Language, displayed homemade devices to substitute for alarm clocks and doorbells, and demonstrated standardized technology such as a TTY, a machine that allows deaf people to make phone calls. Deaf visitors were invited to share jokes, riddles, stories, or puns on videotape with Smithsonian researchers. These recordings were only recently preserved and previously were inaccessible due to their advanced age and format obsolescence. Transcription of their content will provide access- for the first time - to those hard of hearing, and increase our understanding of the history of accessibility in the United States. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. If you can identify the speakers, please do so using the format {SPEAKER NAME= "____" } if you cannot identify the speakers, please simply indicate when a different individual is speaking by inserting the "Speaker 1," "Speaker 2," etc. tags. For more information about the programs in these recordings, please look at the audio log sheets describing the content and speakers at each presentation.

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20 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

Deaf Folklore: Deaf Theater: Kaleidoscope: Moore, Jan de Lap, Hathaway, Jones, Schultz JUN 26 1981

The 1981 Smithsonian Folklife Festival celebrated the skills and traditions of a cultural minority who, despite their large numbers, frequently pass unnoticed: deaf and hard of hearing Americans. In recognition of the International Year of Disabled Persons, deaf participants performed "signlore," told stories emerging from Deaf culture (often with a capital D), and discussed life and experiences growing up deaf. They taught workshops on American Sign Language, displayed homemade devices to substitute for alarm clocks and doorbells, and demonstrated standardized technology such as a TTY, a machine that allows deaf people to make phone calls. Deaf visitors were invited to share jokes, riddles, stories, or puns on videotape with Smithsonian researchers. These recordings were only recently preserved and previously were inaccessible due to their advanced age and format obsolescence. Transcription of their content will provide access- for the first time - to those hard of hearing, and increase our understanding of the history of accessibility in the United States. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. If you can identify the speakers, please do so using the format {SPEAKER NAME= "____" } if you cannot identify the speakers, please simply indicate when a different individual is speaking by inserting the "Speaker 1," "Speaker 2," etc. tags. For more information about the programs in these recordings, please look at the audio log sheets describing the content and speakers at each presentation.

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