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5 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

"Keeping the Nation in Good Shape," Maidenform, Inc., Maidenform Collection

A thriving brassiere company created in 1922, Maidenform Inc. offered a new type of undergarment for women that enhanced, rather than downplayed, a woman's natural figure. Maidenform advertising campaigns were enormously successful, and generated controversy as well as praise. The now famous "I Dreamed" campaign was launched in 1949; this campaign ran for 20 years, making it one of the longest running campaigns in the history of advertising. The advertisements featured models in everyday or fantastic situations, elaborately costumed but wearing only a Maidenform bra above the waist. This campaign was followed by the "Maidenform Woman" campaign which was credited with boosting sales by 200 percent in some stores. This booklet & other company records, including advertisements and reports, reveals information about the history of the brassiere industry and female-centered marketing campaigns. Help transcribe this material as part of the Smithsonian's #BecauseOfHerStory campaign to share and celebrate the diverse stories of American girlhood. Coordination of this and other girlhood history projects in the Transcription Center (including selection, digitization, cataloging, outreach, and educational resources) was funded by the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative. Click here to learn more.

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13 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

"Life with Teena: A Seventeen Magazine Survey of Subscribers and their Mothers, Vol. 1," Estelle Ellis Collection

Publishing, advertising, and marketing pioneer, Estelle Ellis was among the first to focus on the American female demographic, especially teens and working-class women. Condé Nast Publications, Incorporated, Carter Hawley Hale-owned department stores, Phillips-Van Heusen, Dow Chemical, and the Kimberly-Clark Corporation were among her clients. This advertisement and other materials from Ellis's professional papers reveal information about the history of female-centered marketing campaigns, publications, and the advertising industry. Help transcribe this material as part of the Smithsonian's #BecauseOfHerStory campaign to share and celebrate the diverse stories of American girlhood. Coordination of this and other girlhood history projects in the Transcription Center (including selection, digitization, cataloging, outreach, and educational resources) was funded by the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative. Click here to learn more.

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1 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

"Maiden-Forum Newsletter: Thirty Years of Progress," Jan. - Dec., 1952, Maidenform Collection

A thriving brassiere company created in 1922, Maidenform Inc. offered a new type of undergarment for women that enhanced, rather than downplayed, a woman's natural figure. Maidenform advertising campaigns were enormously successful, and generated controversy as well as praise. The now famous "I Dreamed" campaign was launched in 1949; this campaign ran for 20 years, making it one of the longest running campaigns in the history of advertising. The advertisements featured models in everyday or fantastic situations, elaborately costumed but wearing only a Maidenform bra above the waist. This campaign was followed by the "Maidenform Woman" campaign which was credited with boosting sales by 200 percent in some stores. This article & other company records, including advertisements and reports, reveals information about the history of the brassiere industry and female-centered marketing campaigns. Help transcribe this material as part of the Smithsonian's #BecauseOfHerStory campaign to share and celebrate the diverse stories of American girlhood. Coordination of this and other girlhood history projects in the Transcription Center (including selection, digitization, cataloging, outreach, and educational resources) was funded by the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative. Click here to learn more.

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2 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

"Seventeen: A Unique Case Study," 1945 April 15, Estelle Ellis Collection

Publishing, advertising, and marketing pioneer, Estelle Ellis was among the first to focus on the American female demographic, especially teens and working-class women. Condé Nast Publications, Incorporated, Carter Hawley Hale-owned department stores, Phillips-Van Heusen, Dow Chemical, and the Kimberly-Clark Corporation were among her clients. This advertisement and other materials from Ellis's professional papers reveal information about the history of female-centered marketing campaigns, publications, and the advertising industry. Help transcribe this material as part of the Smithsonian's #BecauseOfHerStory campaign to share and celebrate the diverse stories of American girlhood. Coordination of this and other girlhood history projects in the Transcription Center (including selection, digitization, cataloging, outreach, and educational resources) was funded by the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative. Click here to learn more.

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69 Total Pages 23 Contributing Members

1981 Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Deaf Folklore Audio Log Sheets

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed “class style” notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. For Folklore of the Deaf program material, some logs contain information not spoken through the public address system but were in fact signed and interpreted to the visitors in the audience.

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49 Total Pages 39 Contributing Members

A Cinema Apart: African American Film Memorabilia (Larry Richards Collection)

During the segregation era, an independent industry dedicated to the production of “race movies” for African American audiences emerged in response to the exclusion of black artists from Hollywood and to counter the negative, stereotypical representations of African Americans in mainstream movies. The Richards Collection features rare items that document this formative period. Larry Richards began collecting around 1986 after receiving a race film poster (The Bull-Dogger) to exhibit in the 4th annual film festival during Black History Month at the Free Library of Philadelphia. His collection of race film memorabilia spans most genres, including musicals, westerns, and horror. Richards’ collection contains over 700 objects covering a period of time from the early age of cinema up through the 1950s. Help us transcribe these race film materials and learn about some of the popular films in this genre.

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1 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

A. M. Davis Christmas Card, 1929, Norcross Greeting Card Collection

Transcribe this 1920's holiday card as part of our #TCGreetings campaign! The Norcross Greeting Card Collection consists of cards and a few records of both the Norcross Greeting Card Company and the Rust Craft Greeting Card Company, circa 1911 1981; antique greeting cards, circa 1800 1930 (bulk 1880 1900) collected by both these companies and their executives; and a small number of modern cards by other manufacturers, circa 1939 1960. According to Norcross Company officials in 1978, this collection represents "not only a history of the development of the greeting card industry but also a history of social trends in the United States" and gives "an indication of the quality and technology of the [printing] industry from 1924 through 1978." Learn more about both companies in the collection's finding aid.

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394 Total Pages 65 Contributing Members

Abrege des Descriptions des Artes

Likely copied from the publication Descriptions des Arts et Metiers (1761-1788), this clearly written manuscript contains abridged descriptions of various 18th century crafts.

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394 Total Pages 65 Contributing Members

Abrege des Descriptions des Artes

Likely copied from the publication Descriptions des Arts et Metiers (1761-1788), this clearly written manuscript contains abridged descriptions of various 18th century crafts.

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9 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

AfriCOBRA Manifestos by Jeff Donaldson and Cherilyn C. Wright

AfriCOBRA (African Commune of Bad Relevant Artists) is an African American artist collective that was founded in 1968, first under the name COBRA (Coalition of Black Revolutionary Artists), in Chicago, Illinois. The founding AfriCOBRA artists were associated with the Black Arts Movement, and the group grew out of discussions on how their art could express a Black aesthetic. The AfriCOBRA philosophy emphasized positive revolutionary ideas and community effort.
Jeff Donaldson was a co-founding life-long member, and kept extensive files on AfriCOBRA’s early years. Here we have some drafts of manifestos by Donaldson and Cherilyn C. Wright, associated with the Ten in Search of a Nation exhibition, from his papers.

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