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81% Complete

114 Total Pages 55 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore - Western United States, 1918: Breeding waterfowl, field diaries

Following his time in southern Texas and Arkansas, ornithologist Alexander Wetmore moves on to spend four months, from late spring to the very end of summer, observing waterfowl breeding in the southwestern United States. Nonetheless, the contentious relationship between migrating birds and farmers through out the Southwest continues to crop up in his notes. This field diary includes wonderfully detailed descriptions and sketches of birds' mating rituals that Wetmore observed interspersed with terse notes about the farmers. One "wants government to send in soldiers to kill off ducks." Another farmer wants the privilege of doing it himself. This field diary proves to be a real transcription challenge because Wetmore's penciled notes are in some places both faint and smudged. Are you up to it? Join other stalwart #volunpeers in this effort.

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66% Complete

193 Total Pages 23 Contributing Members

Alice Cunningham Fletcher Papers- Correspondence Box 1, 1881-1882

Alice Cunningham Fletcher (1838-1923), was an ethnologist and collaborator with the Peabody Museum of Harvard, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. A pioneer in a field dominated by men, she was one of the first female ethnologists to conduct fieldwork among the Omaha, Nez Perce, Winnebago and Sioux Indian tribes. Fletcher worked closely with Francis La Flesche, an Omaha Indian and fellow ethnologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. Because of their close personal and professional relationship, much of their research materials and correspondence are housed together in the National Anthropological Archives.

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50% Complete

114 Total Pages 16 Contributing Members

Alice Cunningham Fletcher Papers- Correspondence Box 1, 1883

Alice Cunningham Fletcher (1838-1923), was an ethnologist and collaborator with the Peabody Museum of Harvard, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. A pioneer in a field dominated by men, she was one of the first female ethnologists to conduct fieldwork among the Omaha, Nez Perce, Winnebago and Sioux Indian tribes. Fletcher worked closely with Francis La Flesche, an Omaha Indian and fellow ethnologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. Because of their close personal and professional relationship, much of their research materials and correspondence are housed together in the National Anthropological Archives.

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77% Complete

167 Total Pages 21 Contributing Members

Alice Cunningham Fletcher Papers- Correspondence Box 1, 1884-85

Alice Cunningham Fletcher (1838-1923), was an ethnologist and collaborator with the Peabody Museum of Harvard, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. A pioneer in a field dominated by men, she was one of the first female ethnologists to conduct fieldwork among the Omaha, Nez Perce, Winnebago and Sioux Indian tribes. Fletcher worked closely with Francis La Flesche, an Omaha Indian and fellow ethnologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. Because of their close personal and professional relationship, much of their research materials and correspondence are housed together in the National Anthropological Archives.

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2% Complete

179 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Alice Cunningham Fletcher Papers- Correspondence Box 1, 1886-87

Alice Cunningham Fletcher (1838-1923), was an ethnologist and collaborator with the Peabody Museum of Harvard, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. A pioneer in a field dominated by men, she was one of the first female ethnologists to conduct fieldwork among the Omaha, Nez Perce, Winnebago and Sioux Indian tribes. Fletcher worked closely with Francis La Flesche, an Omaha Indian and fellow ethnologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. Because of their close personal and professional relationship, much of their research materials and correspondence are housed together in the National Anthropological Archives.

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1% Complete

83 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Alice Cunningham Fletcher Papers- Correspondence Box: 1, 1888-90

Alice Cunningham Fletcher (1838-1923), was an ethnologist and collaborator with the Peabody Museum of Harvard, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. A pioneer in a field dominated by men, she was one of the first female ethnologists to conduct fieldwork among the Omaha, Nez Perce, Winnebago and Sioux Indian tribes. Fletcher worked closely with Francis La Flesche, an Omaha Indian and fellow ethnologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. Because of their close personal and professional relationship, much of their research materials and correspondence are housed together in the National Anthropological Archives.

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0% Complete

172 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

Alice Cunningham Fletcher Papers- Correspondence Box: 1, 1891

Alice Cunningham Fletcher (1838-1923), was an ethnologist and collaborator with the Peabody Museum of Harvard, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. A pioneer in a field dominated by men, she was one of the first female ethnologists to conduct fieldwork among the Omaha, Nez Perce, Winnebago and Sioux Indian tribes. Fletcher worked closely with Francis La Flesche, an Omaha Indian and fellow ethnologist with the Bureau of American Ethnology. Because of their close personal and professional relationship, much of their research materials and correspondence are housed together in the National Anthropological Archives.

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84% Complete

521 Total Pages 119 Contributing Members

Joseph D. Mountain - Log Books, Military and Civilian, 1943-1945

This collection follows Joseph Mountain's aviation career as a U.S. Air Service pilot, aerial surveyor, photographer, and writer. It includes photographic negatives and prints, diaries and flight log books, reports, and maps. Mountain's photographs from his service in Saudi Arabia, taken not long before the great oil discoveries at Dammam in 1938, capture the desert kingdom at the very edge of the tremendous changes that the oil economy brought to the Gulf. Mountain also extensively photographed members of the California-Arabian Standard Oil Company (CASOC) team at work and interacting with their Saudi workers and acquaintances. Help us transcribe his documents and images which are a fascinating record of traditional Saudi Arabian life, crafts, and architecture. Highlights include portraits of dancers at Eid al-Fitr celebrations, market scenes in Hufuf and the Old Town of Al Jubail, camel caravans, Saudi hunters with their hawks, and pearl fishermen and their dhows.

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73% Complete

262 Total Pages 20 Contributing Members

North Carolina Assistant Commissioner, Letters Received, Unregistered Letters, A-E, 1866, Part 2

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for the State of North Carolina, Series 4: Letters Received. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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50% Complete

260 Total Pages 18 Contributing Members

North Carolina Assistant Commissioner, Letters Received, Unregistered Letters, F-W, 1866, Part 1

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for the State of North Carolina, Series 4: Letters Received. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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