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1 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

"Let Freedom Ring, Let Democracy Prevail" sketch

Issues with race and racial equity have a long history in the United States (US) and so do interracial organizations forming to combat discriminatory practices and demand social justice for all Americans. The story of the Institute on Race Relations, founded by Tomlinson D. Todd (1910 – 1987), is an example of a substantive but understudied history of collaborative anti-racist activism in the District of Columbia. The organization’s aim was to combat segregation and discrimination in the Nation’s Capital through activism and the “Americans All” radio program. Help us transcribe these records, and discover how this interracial organization addressed segregation and worked to end discriminatory practices in Washington, DC.

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1 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

"We Fought together for Freedom" sketch

Issues with race and racial equity have a long history in the United States (US) and so do interracial organizations forming to combat discriminatory practices and demand social justice for all Americans. The story of the Institute on Race Relations, founded by Tomlinson D. Todd (1910 – 1987), is an example of a substantive but understudied history of collaborative anti-racist activism in the District of Columbia. The organization’s aim was to combat segregation and discrimination in the Nation’s Capital through activism and the “Americans All” radio program. Help us transcribe these records, and discover how this interracial organization addressed segregation and worked to end discriminatory practices in Washington, DC.

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3 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

A Decade of United Action, 1935-1945, National Council of Negro Women Brochure

Imagine launching a campaign to raise $55,000 in 1945, the year that World War II ended. This bold challenge by the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) exemplifies the highly organized activism of the clubwoman movement. In 1935, educator Mary McLeod Bethune founded the NCNW, building on the legacy of the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs (NACW), founded in 1896 to combat lynching. Both united local African American women’s clubs across the U.S. Clubwomen supported African American communities in myriad ways: fighting poverty, providing education, offering child care for working mothers, advocating for civil rights, and striving for international peace. A diverse collection of documents from the 1940s to 1960s awaits transcription, such as event programs, flyers, and tickets; an obituary; a meeting agenda in Spanish; and, a leadership handbook. Learn more about NACW programs that honored abolitionist Frederick Douglass and raised funds to preserve his home in Washington, D.C. and NCNW programs on cultural exchanges with British women after World War II. Look for the integral relationship of church and community; churches often hosted clubwoman events. Notice the presence of music and art, verbally and visually. Discover how African American clubwomen carried out their mission of “lifting as we climb,” and find a message written in the stars. Thank you for helping to make these archival documents searchable!

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4 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Address by Mr. Tomlinson D. Todd President of the Institute on Race Relations

Issues with race and racial equity have a long history in the United States (US) and so do interracial organizations forming to combat discriminatory practices and demand social justice for all Americans. The story of the Institute on Race Relations, founded by Tomlinson D. Todd (1910 – 1987), is an example of a substantive but understudied history of collaborative anti-racist activism in the District of Columbia. The organization’s aim was to combat segregation and discrimination in the Nation’s Capital through activism and the “Americans All” radio program. Help us transcribe these records, and discover how this interracial organization addressed segregation and worked to end discriminatory practices in Washington, DC.

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11 Total Pages 23 Contributing Members

Address...Hon. Federick Douglass, delivered in the Congregational Church, on the twenty-first Anniversary of Emanicaption in the District of Columbia

On April 16, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed into law the District of Columbia Compensated Emancipation Act. The act freed approximately 3,000 slaves and paid slave owners for their release, thus ending slavery in the District of Columbia. Twenty-one years later, on the anniversary of emancipation in D.C., Frederick Douglass delivered a speech at Congregational Church. Transcribe this pamphlet to learn the details of Douglass’ speech and make it searchable for researchers.

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5 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Admission Tickets to the Institute on Race Relations Party

Issues with race and racial equity have a long history in the United States (US) and so do interracial organizations forming to combat discriminatory practices and demand social justice for all Americans. The story of the Institute on Race Relations, founded by Tomlinson D. Todd (1910 – 1987), is an example of a substantive but understudied history of collaborative anti-racist activism in the District of Columbia. The organization’s aim was to combat segregation and discrimination in the Nation’s Capital through activism and the “Americans All” radio program. Help us transcribe these records, and discover how this interracial organization addressed segregation and worked to end discriminatory practices in Washington, DC.

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30 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

Armstrong Manual Training School Yearbook, 1902-1903

Help us make this fragile Armstrong Manual Training School yearbook more accessible and searchable! Armstrong Manual Training School was authorized by congress as a vocational high school for African American youth in Washington, DC, in 1902. The Renaissance Revival building was designed by architect Waddy B. Wood and named for Samuel C. Armstrong (1839-1893), a white commander of an African American Civil War regiment. On September 24, 1902 Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) delivered the keynote speech during the dedication ceremony. In 1996 the school was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. It currently serves the local community as the Armstrong Adult Education Center.

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6 Total Pages 13 Contributing Members

Behind the Apron Project: Doris Harris Interview, May 12, 1997, Part 2

Behind the Apron oral history project documents the experiences of Black oyster and clam workers in Southern Maryland. The interviews explore issues such as: the connection between land and water, between farming and the fishing industry; the communal spirit and camaraderie amongst oyster workers; the experience of women oyster workers; and the changes in the oyster packing industry resulting in a diminished African American workforce. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

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1 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Behind the Apron Project: Blondell Mason Interview, April 17, 1997, Part 1

Behind the Apron oral history project documents the experiences of Black oyster and clam workers in Southern Maryland. The interviews explore issues such as: the connection between land and water, between farming and the fishing industry; the communal spirit and camaraderie amongst oyster workers; the experience of women oyster workers; and the changes in the oyster packing industry resulting in a diminished African American workforce. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

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7 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Behind the Apron Project: Christine Gray Interview, 1997

Behind the Apron oral history project documents the experiences of Black oyster and clam workers in Southern Maryland. The interviews explore issues such as: the connection between land and water, between farming and the fishing industry; the communal spirit and camaraderie amongst oyster workers; the experience of women oyster workers; and the changes in the oyster packing industry resulting in a diminished African American workforce. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

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