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202 Total Pages 51 Contributing Members

"Lyrics of Love and Laughter" by Paul Laurence Dunbar

Paul Laurence Dunbar was a renowned poet, author, and playwright. In 1903 he published a collection of poems titled Lyrics of Love and Laughter. Written after a separation from his wife, a nervous breakdown, and a bout with pneumonia, this book of poems contains both “sentimental and somberly realistic expressions and depictions of black life.” Help us transcribe the more than 100 poems featured in this compilation and see how Dunbar used both dialect and standard English verse in his poetry.

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132 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

"Poems of Cabin and Field" by Paul Laurence Dunbar

Paul Laurence Dunbar was a renowned poet, author, and playwright. “Poems of Cabin and Field,” published in 1899, is a collection of eight previously published poems by Dunbar. The book features decorations by his wife, Alice Cordelia Morse, and photographs from the Hampton Institute Camera Club. Help us transcribe Dunbar’s book of poetry that draws influence from his family’s path from slavery to freedom.

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166 Total Pages 48 Contributing Members

"The 1931 Wildcat" - Wiley College Yearbook

Help us transcribe this 1931 edition of HBCU Wiley College’s yearbook, “The Wildcat” and get to know the faculty and students while learning about the types of clubs and organizations they participated in. Among these students was Henrietta Bell Wells, the first female member of the Wiley College debate team and a member of the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. Bell Wells made history by participating in the first college debate between white and African American students in 1930. This yearbook belonged to her. The Wiley College debate team defeated some of the top teams in the country and won a national title in 1935.

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246 Total Pages 99 Contributing Members

"The Conjure Woman" by Charles W. Chesnutt

Charles W. Chesnutt was an author, lawyer, and activist whose work explored social and racial relations in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In 1899, he published his first book, “The Conjure Woman,” a collection of seven short stories that deal with race relations in both the pre- and post-Civil War South. The book is narrated by a formerly enslaved man named Uncle Julius McAdoo and a northerner named John. Uncle Julius tells the stories to John and his wife Annie who are considering purchasing an old plantation in the South. Help us transcribe this first edition publication of “The Conjure Woman” and see how Chesnutt uses the juxtaposition of the two narrators to emphasize differences in language and the complexities of race relations during this time period.

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362 Total Pages 113 Contributing Members

"Twelve Years A Slave" by Solomon Northup

Solomon Northup (1808–1875), was born free in Saratoga Springs, New York around 1808. Northup was a farmer and professional violinist who traveled to Washington, D.C., in 1841 for a traveling musician’s job. While in Washington, he was kidnapped and sold into slavery. Northup was enslaved in several Louisiana plantations but was able to contact his family. His family enlisted the help of many, including the New York governor, to free Northup. At the time, New York State had a law in place that provided aid to New York citizens who had been kidnapped into slavery. After 12 years of enslavement, Northup was freed in January 1853. Later that year, Northup wrote and published his memoir, Twelve Years A Slave. Northup was more fortunate than many to gain his freedom and became active in the abolition movement and aided in the efforts of the Underground Railroad. This copy is a first edition, noted as the Seventeenth Thousand published copy in 1853. Help us transcribe this rare example of a firsthand account of an enslaved man that gripped the nation and became a rallying call for abolition.

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152 Total Pages 21 Contributing Members

"When Malindy Sings" by Paul Laurence Dunbar

Paul Laurence Dunbar was a renowned poet, author, and playwright. “When Malindy Sings” is a collection of Dunbar’s poems first published in 1896. The title poem, inspired by Dunbar’s mother’s love of hymns and spirituals, became one of his most famous works. In addition to Dunbar’s poetry, this second edition of the book, published in 1903, also features photographs from the Hampton Institute Camera Club. Help us transcribe Dunbar’s book of poetry that draws influence from his family’s path from slavery to freedom.

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309 Total Pages 34 Contributing Members

“The Girl Graduate – Her Own Book”

Transcribe “The Girl Graduate – Her Own Book” and help us to learn more about Marjorie P. Collins. Collins assembled this scrapbook commemorating her time at Prairie View College (now Prairie View A&M University) in Prairie View, Texas. In 1925, Collins graduated from Prairie View and was elected to become a teacher at the Almeda Road Junior High School, in Houston, Texas. She also worked closely with the National Council of Negro Women. Beyond those facts, we know very little about Collins. With your help, perhaps we can discover more about Collins within in the 190 pages of newspaper clippings, photographs, hand-written entries, printed programs, ribbons, and correspondence relating to her life.

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56 Total Pages 21 Contributing Members

115th Anniversary of the First African Baptist Church and the 8th Anniversary of our Pastor Rev. Y. B. Williams and the Dedicati

The First African Baptist Church, Richmond, was founded in 1841 in Richmond, Virginia. After the Civil War, the church became one of the largest in America. This pamphlet honors the dedication of a new church building and helps to celebrate 115 years of the church’s founding. Learn about the history of one of the oldest African American churches in America by transcribing this anniversary program.

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49 Total Pages 39 Contributing Members

A Cinema Apart: African American Film Memorabilia (Larry Richards Collection)

During the segregation era, an independent industry dedicated to the production of “race movies” for African American audiences emerged in response to the exclusion of black artists from Hollywood and to counter the negative, stereotypical representations of African Americans in mainstream movies. The Richards Collection features rare items that document this formative period. Larry Richards began collecting around 1986 after receiving a race film poster (The Bull-Dogger) to exhibit in the 4th annual film festival during Black History Month at the Free Library of Philadelphia. His collection of race film memorabilia spans most genres, including musicals, westerns, and horror. Richards’ collection contains over 700 objects covering a period of time from the early age of cinema up through the 1950s. Help us transcribe these race film materials and learn about some of the popular films in this genre.

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49 Total Pages 53 Contributing Members

Abbott's Monthly Vol. II No. 1

From October 1929 to September 1933, "Abbott’s Monthly" successfully engaged readers with a cosmopolitan feel that featured unknown contemporary authors who addressed African American news while also writing fiction pieces. The publication was founded by Robert Sengstacke Abbott, founder and owner of the already popular "Chicago Defender," the most popular African American newspaper in the country at the time. The first edition of "Abbott's Monthly" sold nearly 50,000 copies and shortly thereafter soared to 100,000. However, the magazine in it's original form ceased publication in 1933 due to the Great Depression, but continued to be publish under a new name "Abbott’s Monthly Illustrated News," until 1934. Help us transcribe this Abbott’s Monthly to explore the culture of the 1930s.

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