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50 Total Pages 57 Contributing Members

Log of the proceedings of H. M. S. Comus

The logbook of the proceedings of the ship, H.M.S. Comus. The log reports the actions taken by the ship as part of a six-month assignment with the West African Squadron, including accounts of encounters and armed conflicts with pirate slavers. The mission of the ship, under Captain John Taileur, was to suppress piracy and disrupt the illegal West African slave trade. During the mission, they captured 10 ships and freed close to 10,000 enslaved men and women. The H.M.S. Comus, a 22-gun sixth rate man-of-war had a distinguished record capturing Spanish, Danish, and other ships, including the American ship, Jane Barnes, during the War of 1812. The Comus was also the first man-of-war to ascend the Old Calabar River to Duke Town (Nigeria), where in March 1814, her armed boats captured seven Portuguese and Spanish vessels with 550 enslaved on board. Help us transcribe this historically important and detailed Log of the Comus that provides early evidence of the Royal Navy’s vigorous policy to enforce the British ban on slavery by shutting down slave trade routes and seizing slave ships at sea.

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2 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

Historical Records of the DeWolf Family, Series 3: Sugar Manifest for ship from Havana, Cuba to Philadelphia, PA

The DeWolf family was one of the wealthiest New England families in the 18th-19th centuries and made their fortune from the transatlantic slave trade. Between 1769 and 1820, it is believed that DeWolf-owned vessels carried more than 12,000 enslaved Africans across the Middle Passage. The DeWolf family owned numerous sugar and coffee plantations in Cuba, where sugar from the plantations was made into molasses, transported to Rhode Island in DeWolf vessels, and transformed into rum in DeWolf-owned distilleries. The rum was then taken to Africa and used as payment for enslaved captives, who were transported across the Atlantic and eventually sold in Cuba and ports for tremendous profit. The profit generated from the transatlantic slave trade allowed the family to start a bank and insurance company. In 1808, Congress banned the import of enslaved people into the United States. The DeWolf family turned to new ventures to keep their wealth, including privateering and establishing the Arkwright Mill in Coventry, Rhode Island, which processed and manufactured cotton harvested by enslaved people. Help us transcribe this important collection that documents the business of the transatlantic slave trade and how the DeWolf family profited off the institution of slavery.

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2 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Historical Records of the DeWolf Family, Series 3: Ship route of the Brigantine Fanny bound from the Port of Providence...

The DeWolf family was one of the wealthiest New England families in the 18th-19th centuries and made their fortune from the transatlantic slave trade. Between 1769 and 1820, it is believed that DeWolf-owned vessels carried more than 12,000 enslaved Africans across the Middle Passage. The DeWolf family owned numerous sugar and coffee plantations in Cuba, where sugar from the plantations was made into molasses, transported to Rhode Island in DeWolf vessels, and transformed into rum in DeWolf-owned distilleries. The rum was then taken to Africa and used as payment for enslaved captives, who were transported across the Atlantic and eventually sold in Cuba and ports for tremendous profit. The profit generated from the transatlantic slave trade allowed the family to start a bank and insurance company. In 1808, Congress banned the import of enslaved people into the United States. The DeWolf family turned to new ventures to keep their wealth, including privateering and establishing the Arkwright Mill in Coventry, Rhode Island, which processed and manufactured cotton harvested by enslaved people. Help us transcribe this important collection that documents the business of the transatlantic slave trade and how the DeWolf family profited off the institution of slavery.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Whitney M. Young Jr. award received by Norma Merrick Sklarek

Explore the connection between activism and architecture by transcribing this Whitney M. Young Jr. Award. In 1968, Young (1921 - 1971) delivered the keynote speech at the American Institute of Architects annual convention. The speech challenged the field to engage with social issues. Architect Norma Sklarek (1926 - 2012) received this award for her career of dedicated service as the “Rosa Parks of Architecture.” Sklarek was a pioneering African American architect and one of the first licensed female architects in the country.

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4 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Letter from Anacostia Museum to Norma Merrick Sklarek

This letter is from the Anacostia Museum to architect Norma Sklarek (1926 - 2012). Sklarek was a pioneering African American architect and one of the first licensed female architects in the country. The Anacostia Museum had an exhibit titled “Black Women: Achievements Against the Odds.” The museum expressed an interest in including Sklarek and the history of female architects in the exhibition. Learn more about this untold story by transcribing this letter.

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2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Letter from DL Chandler to Norma Merrick Sklarek

Help us transcribe this letter from student DL Chandler to Norma Merrick Sklarek (1926-2012). When the letter was written, Chandler was an architecture student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology researching a potential dissertation topic, “Architectural History of Black America,” for a PhD thesis. Sklarek was a pioneering African American architect and one of the first licensed female architects in the country.

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2 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

Letter to William Turner from Eyo Honesty II [2]

This letter was written by King Eyo Honesty II in Old Calabar, Nigeria to Captain William Turner in Liverpool, England. Between 1720 and 1830 over one million enslaved men and women were forced onto British slave ships based in Old Calabar. Although the British had banned the slave trade in 1808, slavery was not banned in all British territories until 1833, and traders from other nations continued to purchase slaves at Calabar until 1842. This letter dates from the historically important moment when the two most prominent Efik kings at Calabar, Eyo Honesty II and Eyamaba V, gave-up their trading monopoly over the supply of slaves captured in the interior, and replaced it with a plantation system for the cultivation of palm oil. By the 1840s Calabar had become the center for the export of palm oil to industrial Britain. This letter documents various aspects of the trading partnership and the friendship between Turner and the Old Calabar kings. In particular, the informal “trust trade” system derived from the slave trading days, whereby Turner and other European traders traded manufactured goods (rum in particular) to Eyo Honesty and other rulers in exchange for palm oil, sugar, etc. Help us transcribe this important letter documenting Eyo Honesty II’s efforts to find new business ventures with Europeans once slavery was abolished.

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2 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

Letter to William Turner from Eyamba V

This letter was written by Eyamba V to William Turner. Eyamba ruled over the township of Duke in the city-state of Old Calabar, now Calabar, Nigeria. Between 1720 and 1830 over one million enslaved men and women were forced onto British slave ships based in Old Calabar. Although the British had banned the slave trade in 1808, slavery was not banned in all British territories until 1833, and traders from other nations continued to purchase slaves at Calabar until 1842. This letter dates from the historically important moment when the two most prominent Efik kings at Calabar, Eyo Honesty II and Eyamba V, gave-up their trading monopoly over the supply of slaves captured in the interior, and replaced it with a plantation system for the cultivation of palm oil. By the 1840s Calabar had become the center for the export of palm oil to industrial Britain. This letter documents various aspects of the trading partnership and the friendship between Turner and the Old Calabar kings. In particular, the informal “trust trade” system derived from the slave trading days, whereby Turner and other European traders traded manufactured goods (rum in particular) to Eyamba and other rulers in exchange for palm oil, sugar, etc. Help us transcribe this important letter documenting Eyamba V’s efforts to find new business ventures with Europeans once slavery was abolished.

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3 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Letter to William Turner from Eyo Honesty II [3]

This letter was written by King Eyo Honesty II in Old Calabar, Nigeria, to Captain William Turner in Liverpool, England. Between 1720 and 1830 over one million enslaved men and women were forced onto British slave ships based in Old Calabar. Although the British had banned the slave trade in 1808, slavery was not banned in all British territories until 1833, and traders from other nations continued to purchase slaves at Calabar until 1842. This letter dates from the historically important moment when the two most prominent Efik kings at Calabar, Eyo Honesty II and Eyamaba V, gave-up their trading monopoly over the supply of slaves captured in the interior, and replaced it with a plantation system for the cultivation of palm oil. By the 1840s, Calabar had become the center for the export of palm oil to industrial Britain. This letter documents various aspects of the trading partnership and the friendship between Turner and the Old Calabar kings. In particular, the informal “trust trade” system derived from the slave trading days, whereby Turner and other European traders traded manufactured goods (rum in particular) to Eyo Honesty II and other rulers in exchange for palm oil, sugar, etc. Help us transcribe this important letter documenting Eyo Honesty II’s efforts to find new business ventures with Europeans once slavery was abolished.

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2 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Testament of pay for Pvt. Edward Carter

A testament of pay for Revolutionary War soldier Edward Carter from 1871. This document certifies Carter’s three-year military service based out of Colchester, Connecticut. Edward Carter (1741–1818) fought in both the French and Indian War and the American Revolution. Carter, his four sons, and several other freemen, enlisted to serve in the War in the Connecticut Army. Carter fought in the battle of Germantown in Philadelphia, participated in the failed defense of Ft. Mifflin on the Delaware, and wintered at Valley Forge with Gen. George Washington. The following year, he participated in the Battle of Monmouth when Washington overtook the British there, and wintered again with Washington at White Plains, where he was reunited with his sons. In 1779, he participated with all four of his sons in the successful overthrow of the British works at Stoney Point near the Hudson River. After this, Carter worked fortifying West Point and was present for the hanging of Major John Andre. He served in New England until the end of the War. Help us transcribe this rare example of an African American soldier fighting in the American Revolutionary War.

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