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Advertisement card for the Down Home Quartette

This advertisement is for a performance by the Down Home Quartette, a male singing group based in Mexico, Missouri.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Advertisement card for the Golden Echoes singing group

This advertisement is for a performance by the Golden Echoes Female Quartet, an all-female singing group associated with the McFarland Baptist Church in Evansville, Indiana.

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2 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

Advertisement card for the Holiness Youth Crusade in Detroit, Michigan

This advertisement is for the 1947 Holiness Youth Crusade in Detroit, Michigan, featuring the Cleveland Colored Quintet, an all-male singing group based in Cleveland, Ohio.

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2 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Advertisement card for the Tuskegee Four

This advertisement is for performance by The Tuskegee Four, an all-female singing group associated with Liberty Baptist Church in Chicago, Illinois.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Advertisement for boxing match between Joe Louis and Max Schmeling

Economic despair and widespread unemployment during the Great Depression lead many Americans to seek inspiration and hope in the world of sports. When boxer Joe Louis burst onto the scene in the mid-1930s he became a symbol of pride for African Americans. During the 1930s Joe Louis and German heavyweight Max Schmeling fought two fights whose influence reached far beyond the ring. Louis lost the first fight in 1936, and Schmeling became a symbol of Nazi superiority. The second fight in 1938 was billed as a fight between democracy and fascism. When Louis won in a first-round knockout, the fight was viewed as a triumph for American democracy, though segregation was still widespread in the United States. Cheer on Joe Louis and help us transcribe a ticket from his memorable 1938 knockout against Max Schmeling.

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2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Advertisement for the Dixie Spiritual Singers and a drawing of a boat

This advertisement is for performance by Dixie Spiritual Singers, an all-male singing group based in Richmond, Virginia.

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2 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

Advertisement poster for the Eveready Gospel Singers

This advertisement is for a performance by The Eveready Gospel Singers, an all-female singing group associated with the St John and Greater Friendship Baptist Churches and the Church of God in Christ in South Bend, Indiana.

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25 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

An Outline of Resurrection City as Used

In 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference launched the Poor People’s Campaign, a national, multiethnic movement for economic justice, security, and opportunity for every American. During the Campaign, participants built a tent city, known as Resurrection City, on the 16-acre site between the Lincoln Memorial and the Washington Monument along the National Mall. John Wiebenson, a professor of architecture at the University of Maryland, College Park, led the committee that helped campaign organizers negotiate land, design the encampment, and build housing units for protesters. Published in English, French, and German, this original manuscript by Wiebenson, “An Outline of Resurrection City as Used,” explains the philosophies behind Resurrection City’s design and construction.

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47 Total Pages 34 Contributing Members

Benjamin Banneker's 1793 Almanack and Ephemeris

This 1793 edition of Benjamin Banneker's Almanack and Ephemeris features an annual calendar, statistical information, phases of the moon, astronomical data, and tide tables. Banneker's almanacs were unique because they featured social commentary and politically oriented literature. Some writings from this almanac include "A Plan of a Peace-Office, for the United States," "Extracts from the Debates in the Last Session of the British Parliament, Apr. 1792," "Extract from Jefferson's Notes on Virginia," and "Extract from Wilkinson's Appeal to England on Behalf of the Abused Africans." Please click "READ MORE" below for instructions for transcribing the tables in the almanac.

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1 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Bottle tag from the Cotton Club

The Cotton Club was Harlem’s premier nightclub in the 1920s and 1930s during the Prohibition Era. The club featured many of the greatest African American entertainers of the era, including Count Basie, Ella Fitzgerald, Fats Waller, Louis Armstrong, Dizzy Gillespie, Nat King Cole, Billie Holiday, and Ethel Waters. However, while the performers were black, the club only permitted white audiences. Nonetheless, the Cotton Club launched the careers of many African American performers including Fletcher Henderson, who led the first house band in 1923, and Duke Ellington, whose orchestra was the house band from 1927 to 1931. Cab Calloway's orchestra took over for Ellington’s group in 1931 and Jimmie Lunceford’s band followed in 1934. Lena Horne began her career as a chorus girl at the Cotton Club and Bill “Bojangles” Robinson and Sammy Davis Jr. performed as tap dancers. Help us transcribe this bottle tag, which highlights the role of night clubs during the Prohibition Era.

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