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250 Total Pages 41 Contributing Members

Hampton Classes, 1871-1898

In 1871, Hampton Institute graduated its first class comprised of five women and fourteen men. Between 1871 and 1898 the sizes of the graduating classes at Hampton continued to grow. Listed here are the names of every person to graduate from Hampton Institute between 1871 and 1898. Included in this reference book are two of Hampton’s most famous alumni: Booker T. Washington (founder of Tuskegee Institute) and Robert Sengstacke Abbott (founder of the Chicago Defender). Help us transcribe this book and let us know if you find any other notable alumni on its pages.

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1 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Itinerary for Col. Charles Young's trip from Wilberforce, OH to Washington, DC

During World War One, the African American military experience was one of complexity. America entered the conflict to ensure that democracy would be safe in the world. However, for African Americans democracy at home was not guaranteed. Racism and segregation were rampant throughout the country and fighting for democracy abroad, while still feeling the sting of social, economic, and cultural discrimination was a hypocrisy many struggled with. Despite this sentiment, many African American men and women believed it was their patriotic duty to serve the war effort in some capacity. One of these young men was Sergeant Oscar W. Price. This series of letters between Price and his mentor, Colonel Charles Young, contain content of a seasoned officer advising and supporting a younger man in the military whom he considered a dear friend.

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124 Total Pages 43 Contributing Members

James Baldwin Collection

James Baldwin (1924-1987) spent most of his life speaking out on the issues of race relations and racial discrimination in America. Through numerous bestselling novels, plays, and essays written during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, Baldwin addressed themes of racial and sexual oppression by connecting many of his personal experiences to national and international issues. Although Baldwin spent the bulk of his career living and working in Europe, mainly France and Turkey, he often returned to the United States to take part in events surrounding the American Civil Rights Movement. Help us transcribe the personal objects and letters in this collection that document Baldwin’s life as an expatriate writer and activist in the second half of the twentieth century.

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148 Total Pages 38 Contributing Members

John Freeman Shorter's Diary

“Spent the morning and afternoon at Church and heard two fine sermons. A Report received that Charleston and Columbia had been captured and the left wing of Shermans Army was within 25 miles of Richmond.” So wrote Lieutenant John Freeman Shorter (1842-1865) on February 19, 1865. Shorter raised as a freeman in Washington, D.C., joined the 55th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry in 1863 and became a fully commissioned officer. His diary details the experiences of a civil war soldier from January 1, 1865 to September 30, 1865. Helps us transcribe the rest of his diary and discover what life was like for an African American soldier during the Civil War.

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35 Total Pages 23 Contributing Members

Les Collégiens 1945

The 1945 Stowe Teachers College yearbook, Les Collégiens, highlights the students, faculty, and achievements of the graduating class of 1945. Help us transcribe this yearbook to learn more about the philosophy of the institution, the individual classes at Stowe, and the many types of activities students were involved in.

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1 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Letter to Oscar W. Price from Colonel Charles Young, August 13, 1919

During World War One, the African American military experience was one of complexity. America entered the conflict to ensure that democracy would be safe in the world. However, for African Americans democracy at home was not guaranteed. Racism and segregation were rampant throughout the country and fighting for democracy abroad, while still feeling the sting of social, economic, and cultural discrimination was a hypocrisy many struggled with. Despite this sentiment, many African American men and women believed it was their patriotic duty to serve the war effort in some capacity. One of these young men was Sergeant Oscar W. Price. This series of letters between Price and his mentor, Colonel Charles Young, contain content of a seasoned officer advising and supporting a younger man in the military whom he considered a dear friend.

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100% Complete

1 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

Letter to Oscar W. Price from Colonel Charles Young, August 14, 1918

During World War One, the African American military experience was one of complexity. America entered the conflict to ensure that democracy would be safe in the world. However, for African Americans democracy at home was not guaranteed. Racism and segregation were rampant throughout the country and fighting for democracy abroad, while still feeling the sting of social, economic, and cultural discrimination was a hypocrisy many struggled with. Despite this sentiment, many African American men and women believed it was their patriotic duty to serve the war effort in some capacity. One of these young men was Sergeant Oscar W. Price. This series of letters between Price and his mentor, Colonel Charles Young, contain content of a seasoned officer advising and supporting a younger man in the military whom he considered a dear friend.

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100% Complete

1 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Letter to Oscar W. Price from Colonel Charles Young, January 21, 1918

During World War One, the African American military experience was one of complexity. America entered the conflict to ensure that democracy would be safe in the world. However, for African Americans democracy at home was not guaranteed. Racism and segregation were rampant throughout the country and fighting for democracy abroad, while still feeling the sting of social, economic, and cultural discrimination was a hypocrisy many struggled with. Despite this sentiment, many African American men and women believed it was their patriotic duty to serve the war effort in some capacity. One of these young men was Sergeant Oscar W. Price. This series of letters between Price and his mentor, Colonel Charles Young, contain content of a seasoned officer advising and supporting a younger man in the military whom he considered a dear friend.

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100% Complete

3 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Letter to Oscar W. Price from Colonel Charles Young, July 14, 1918

During World War One, the African American military experience was one of complexity. America entered the conflict to ensure that democracy would be safe in the world. However, for African Americans democracy at home was not guaranteed. Racism and segregation were rampant throughout the country and fighting for democracy abroad, while still feeling the sting of social, economic, and cultural discrimination was a hypocrisy many struggled with. Despite this sentiment, many African American men and women believed it was their patriotic duty to serve the war effort in some capacity. One of these young men was Sergeant Oscar W. Price. This series of letters between Price and his mentor, Colonel Charles Young, contain content of a seasoned officer advising and supporting a younger man in the military whom he considered a dear friend.

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