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40 Total Pages 27 Contributing Members

Post Mortem 1929

In 1929, students in the “professional groups” (medical, dental, law, and pharmaceutical) at Howard University decided to publish a separate yearbook “not to disrupt University Spirit, but…to enhance, concentrate, and help propagate University Spirit.” Post Mortem, as the inaugural publication was titled, features a history of the College of Medicine, a listing of professors and students, and a detailed look into the class of 1929.

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2 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Postcard featuring Buck Leonard’s Baseball Hall of Fame plaque

African Americans have had a complicated relationship with baseball, the “national pastime.” This long history has been characterized by exclusion, innovation, the creation of all-black institutions, struggle, and pioneering successes. The Negro Leagues created opportunities for African Americans to play the game professionally in a segregated nation, but many also looked to the sport as a place where the civil rights cause could be advanced. In 1947 Major League Baseball was integrated when Jackie Robinson signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers, one of the most significant events in the history of African American sport. Help us transcribe this postcard featuring Walter F. “Buck” Leonard’s Baseball Hall of Fame plaque and learn more about the role of African Americans in the history of American baseball.

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2 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Postcard featuring Cool Papa Bell’s Baseball Hall of Fame plaque

African Americans have had a complicated relationship with baseball, the “national pastime.” This long history has been characterized by exclusion, innovation, the creation of all-black institutions, struggle, and pioneering successes. The Negro Leagues created opportunities for African Americans to play the game professionally in a segregated nation, but many also looked to the sport as a place where the civil rights cause could be advanced. In 1947 Major League Baseball was integrated when Jackie Robinson signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers, one of the most significant events in the history of African American sport. Help us transcribe this postcard featuring James “Cool Papa” Bell’s Baseball Hall of Fame plaque and learn more about the role of African Americans in the history of American baseball.

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2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Postcard featuring Judy Johnson’s Baseball Hall of Fame plaque

African Americans have had a complicated relationship with baseball, the “national pastime.” This long history has been characterized by exclusion, innovation, the creation of all-black institutions, struggle, and pioneering successes. The Negro Leagues created opportunities for African Americans to play the game professionally in a segregated nation, but many also looked to the sport as a place where the civil rights cause could be advanced. In 1947 Major League Baseball was integrated when Jackie Robinson signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers, one of the most significant events in the history of African American sport. Help us transcribe this postcard featuring Judy Johnson’s Baseball Hall of Fame plaque and learn more about the role of African Americans in the history of American baseball.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Postcard featuring Satchel Paige’s Baseball Hall of Fame plaque

African Americans have had a complicated relationship with baseball, the “national pastime.” This long history has been characterized by exclusion, innovation, the creation of all-black institutions, struggle, and pioneering successes. The Negro Leagues created opportunities for African Americans to play the game professionally in a segregated nation, but many also looked to the sport as a place where the civil rights cause could be advanced. In 1947 Major League Baseball was integrated when Jackie Robinson signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers, one of the most significant events in the history of African American sport. Help us transcribe this postcard featuring Leroy “Satchel” Paige’s Baseball Hall of Fame plaque and learn more about the role of African Americans in the history of American baseball.

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2 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Poster advertising a game between the Kansas City Monarchs and the Harlem Stars

African Americans have had a complicated relationship with baseball, the “national pastime.” This long history has been characterized by exclusion, innovation, the creation of all-black institutions, struggle, and pioneering successes. The Negro Leagues created opportunities for African Americans to play the game professionally in a segregated nation, but many also looked to the sport as a place where the civil rights cause could be advanced. In 1947 Major League Baseball was integrated when Jackie Robinson signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers, one of the most significant events in the history of African American sport. This broadside advertising a game between two Negro American League teams, the Kansas City Monarchs and the Harlem Stars, features an image of Reece “Goose” Tatum, who played baseball for the Kansas City Monarchs and later played basketball with the Harlem Globetrotters. Help us transcribe this broadside and learn more about the role of African Americans in the history of American baseball.

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1 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Poster advertising Fats Waller's performance at Empire Theatre at Finsbury Park

On August 29th, 1938, Fats Waller preformed in London at the Empire Theatre at Finsbury Park. Hailed as the “World’s Greatest Pianist,” Waller was one of the most popular performers of his era. He was a skilled pianist, a master of stride piano, and a prolific songwriter. Many songs he wrote or co-wrote are still popular, such as "Honeysuckle Rose," "Ain't Misbehavin,'" and "Squeeze Me." Help us transcribe this poster advertising Waller's 1938 performance.

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2 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Poster advertising Marlon Riggs In Person!

Marlon T. Riggs (1957 – 1994) was an award winning filmmaker, artist, educator, and gay rights activist. Before dying from AIDS-related complications at age 37, Riggs wrote, produced, and directed eight films and videos. A tenured professor at University of California - Berkely, Riggs was also a scholar interested in identity, politics, censorship, African American cultural production, and documentary film practice. His films addressed questions of cultural memory and race relations in America as well as exploring personal topics such as sexuality and his HIV status. In a celebration of the life of Marlon Riggs and LGBTQ Pride Month, help us transcribe these selections from a collection of artifacts related to Marlon Riggs donated by his former life partner, Jack Vincent. For more information, check out NMAAHC's web portal to explore LGBTQ+ Objects in the NMAAHC Collection.

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2 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Poster advertising the AIDS Memorial Quilt events

Marlon T. Riggs (1957 – 1994) was an award winning filmmaker, artist, educator, and gay rights activist. Before dying from AIDS-related complications at age 37, Riggs wrote, produced, and directed eight films and videos. A tenured professor at University of California - Berkely, Riggs was also a scholar interested in identity, politics, censorship, African American cultural production, and documentary film practice. His films addressed questions of cultural memory and race relations in America as well as exploring personal topics such as sexuality and his HIV status. In a celebration of the life of Marlon Riggs and LGBTQ Pride Month, help us transcribe these selections from a collection of artifacts related to Marlon Riggs donated by his former life partner, Jack Vincent. For more information, check out NMAAHC's web portal to explore LGBTQ+ Objects in the NMAAHC Collection.

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2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Poster for a game between the Lima-Ohio Colored All Stars and the White All Star

Economic despair and widespread unemployment during the Great Depression lead many Americans to seek inspiration and hope in the world of sports. Like other sports, baseball, both the Negro leagues and the all-white Major Leagues, was not immune to the effects of the Great Depression. Player salaries dropped and attendance at games declined. All-star games were a way to highlight local talent and promote the game during the Great Depression. Help us transcribe this poster from an all-star game between the "colored all stars" and "white all stars" from Northwestern Ohio and surrounding areas.

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