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81 Total Pages 96 Contributing Members

Scrapbook compiled by W.D. Williams while attending Hampton Institute, 1924–28

William Danforth “W.D.” Williams was a high school student in Tulsa during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. His parents, Loula and John Williams, owned the Dreamland Theater and several other Greenwood businesses that were destroyed in the massacre. These objects chronicle W.D.’s life as a college student and football player at the Hampton Institute, the continued pain and grief his family endured as victims and survivors, and his long career as a teacher at Booker T. Washington High School. Help us transcribe this scrapbook compiled by W.D. Williams while attending Hampton Institute to learn more about W.D. Williams and his family.

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2 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Season ticket for the St. Louis Browns baseball team

African Americans have had a complicated relationship with baseball, the “national pastime.” This long history has been characterized by exclusion, innovation, the creation of all-black institutions, struggle, and pioneering successes. The Negro Leagues created opportunities for African Americans to play the game professionally in a segregated nation, but many also looked to the sport as a place where the civil rights cause could be advanced. In 1947 Major League Baseball was integrated when Jackie Robinson signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers, one of the most significant events in the history of African American sport. In 1947, the St. Louis Browns became the third team to integrate Major League Baseball when they signed Hank Thompson. Help us transcribe this broadside and learn more about the role of African Americans in the history of American baseball.

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44 Total Pages 0 Contributing Members

Shearer Summer Theater Collection

Martha’s Vineyard is known for its leisure activities and summers. From the 1940s to the 1980s, the Shearer Summer Theater, an African American theater company, produced shows for locals and tourists alike. The Shearer Summer Theater was the brainchild of Elizabeth “Liz” White, a dresser on Broadway, who directed, and even bought a two story house to act as the stage in the 1950s for the plays. In the 1980s, White completed her first film, a presentation of Othello. Help us transcribe this program from a screening of Liz White’s presentation of Othello at Howard University.

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121 Total Pages 247 Contributing Members

Slavery and Freedom

Have you ever wondered what goes into the making of an exhibition? Here is your chance to contribute to Slavery and Freedom, one of the inaugural exhibitions of the Smithsonian’s newest museum, that National Museum of African American History and Culture. The Slavery and Freedom exhibition explores the founding of the nation through the lens of the African American experience from the development of the Atlantic world in the 15th century up through the Reconstruction Acts following the Civil War. Please join us in transcribing these documents to help uncover the stories of enslaved persons and their resilience, resistance, courage and faith.

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9 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Some Glimpses of Alabama State

Have you ever wondered what college was like in the 1930s? Take a look at the photos and text in this 1937 Alabama State yearbook and help us transcribe the pages to find out.

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1 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Song sheet for Voulez-vous de la Canne à Sucre? performed by Josephine Baker

"Voulez-vous de la Canne à Sucre?," which translates to “Do You Want Sugarcane?,” was performed by Josephine Baker in the 1930s. The 1930 piece was written by Léo Lelièvre and Henri Varna with music by Paddy. Entirely in French, the song was first performed in the Casino de Paris. Help us transcribe the cover of this song sheet to discover the music of the 1930s.

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23 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Soul City Portfolio

Soul City, North Carolina is a planned community initiated by Floyd McKissick with funding from the Department of Housing and Urban Development in 1969. He envisioned a town that would offer African American families affordable housing, jobs and healthcare. The town was partially constructed but never finished. This portfolio details residential, industrial, commercial and business plans for the town.

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202 Total Pages 48 Contributing Members

Sounder

Lonne Elder III was an actor, playwright, and screenwriter who wrote the screenplay for the 1972 film “Sounder,” adapted from William H. Armstrong’s novel of the same name. The film, starring Cicely Tyson, Paul Winfield, and Kevin Hooks, centers on an African American sharecropping family during the Great Depression and the difficulties they face after the father is arrested for stealing food as his family was starving. For this work, Elder received an Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay. Help us transcribe this Academy Award-nominated screenplay.

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20 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Southern Christian Leadership Conference Citizenship Workbook

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) is a civil rights organization that promotes racial equality and social justice through non-violent action. Established in 1957, right after the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the organization is well-known for coordinating the activities of local organizations protesting segregation using boycotts, marches, sit-ins and other non-violent tactics. The SCLC was also deeply involved in economic justice and voter registration campaigns. Citizenship schools were established throughout the South to teach adults English literacy and civics so they could pass voter registration tests. This workbook, owned by Kitt E. Kennedy, Sr., of Winnsboro, SC, illustrates the lessons taught to fuel the political activism of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950's and 1960's. Please help us transcribe the handbook and learn more about the SCLC's efforts.

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32 Total Pages 13 Contributing Members

Souvenir Centennial Celebration: Bethel Baptist Institutional Church Golden Jubilee

The Bethel Baptist Institutional Church is one of the oldest Baptist congregations in Florida. Earliest services were held on a plantation 1838. The congregation included many slaves from surrounding plantations who would require a special day pass that allowed them to travel safely to services. During the Civil War, the church building was used as a hospital for the Union Army. After the war, white members of the church attempted to take over the congregation and remove the African American congregants. These African Americans took their case to court where a judge ruled in their favor. Today, the congregation boasts well over fourteen thousand members. This document is a souvenir program from Bethel Baptist Institutional Church's Golden Jubilee. The souvenir shows the lasting legacy of such an important church in the community and African American life. Learn more by transcribing the celebration marking the history of one hundred years of service.

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