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Souvenir Program for 1924 World's Colored Championship

Baseball, America’s Pastime, was one of the most widely played sports in the 19th and 20th centuries. Unfortunately, as in society in general, racial segregation was heavily present in American baseball. It was an unwritten policy, but remained in effect in the major leagues until 1946 when Jackie Robinson broke the color line and signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers. In the 1880s, due to segregation in minor and major league baseball, the Negro leagues were formed. There were several Negro leagues, including the Negro National League (NNL) and the Eastern Colored League (ECL). The 1924 Colored World Series was a nine game series played between the Kansas City Monarchs of the NNL and the Hilldale Athletic Club of the ECL. Step up to the plate and help us transcribe this official souvenir program from the World’s Colored Championship!

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20 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Souvenir Program of the Goodwill Baptist Church in the Dedication of their New House of Worship

The Goodwill Baptist Church was one of the centers of community life for Richmond, Virginia, in 1953. Discover through transcription how they celebrated their anniversary through this Souvenir program.

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8 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Souvenir Program: Bethel Baptist Institutional Church Brotherhood Alliance

The Bethel Baptist Institutional Church is one of the oldest Baptist congregation in Florida. Earliest services were held on a plantation 1838. The congregation included many slaves from surrounding plantations who would require a special day pass that allowed them to travel safely to services. During the Civil War, the church building was used as a hospital for the Union Army. After the war, white members of the church attempted to take over the congregation and remove the African American congregants. These African Americans took their case to court where a judge ruled in their favor. Today, the congregation boasts well over fourteen thousand members. This document is a souvenir program from the Bethel Baptist Institutional Church Brotherhood Alliance for men's day activities. The interior has images of the men's day officials, a program schedule, and information about committees and speakers. The souvenir shows the lasting legacy of such an important church in the community and African American life. Learn more by transcribing and discovering all the activities of the March 18, 1956 event.

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2 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Spanish language flier for a March on Washington to overturn the Bakke decision

Fliers have often been used to spread political information and announce political gatherings. This Spanish-language flier, shared in New York, announces a march happening April 15, 1978 in Washington, D.C. to protest and overturn the Bakke Decision. In 1976, the Supreme Court of California ruled in favor of Allan Bakke, declaring affirmative action at UC Davis’ medical school as unconstitutional. In October 1977, the case, known as the “Bakke Decision” went to the U.S. Supreme Court. After hearing arguments, the Supreme Court decided in June 1978, that race could be one of several factors in college admissions, upholding affirmative action, but ruled that specific racial quotas were impermissible. Help us transcribe this document to learn more about this landmark litigation.

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2 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

Spanish-language document from the 2008 Obama Virginia campaign office

Voter education and outreach often produce informative materials in various languages to increase voter participation. This is a single page, double-sided Spanish language document from the 2008 Obama campaign field office in Virginia. It highlights how to vote, information about the registration process, types of identification needed to register, and voting poll rights. Help us transcribe this document and learn about political outreach to increase election awareness.

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40 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

Such As I Have

Dennis Comer (D.C.) Washington was the pastor of the Seventeenth Street Baptist Church in Anniston, Alabama, and the executive director of the Sunday School Publication Board of the National Baptist Convention. This book contains sermons from his time as a pastor as well as sermons from the Alabama Baptist State Convention, the Women's Baptist State Convention of Alabama, and the National Baptist Convention, U.S.A., Inc. Help us discover Rev. D.C. Washington's thoughts on "The Regions Beyond" and "Mending Broken Nets."

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Telegram to Althea Gibson from Eleanor Roosevelt

In 1959, Althea Gibson’s autobiography “I Always Wanted to Be Somebody” hit the shelves. According to the NY Times Book Review, “you can read all about the girl from Harlem they call the Jackie Robinson of tennis. Her book is amazingly candid…The language is the language Althea uses, and the frankness with which she speaks of her life is not only refreshing but fascinating.” Gibson was one of the most formidable sportswomen of the mid-20th century. She was the number-one-ranked female tennis player in the world in 1957 and 1958, a two-time Wimbledon ladies singles champion, two-time U.S. Open ladies singles champion, winner of multiple doubles and mixed doubles tournaments, and a professional golfer. Gibson took to tennis as a teen and despite her skill was often prohibited from playing in elite tournaments because of her race. In 1950, lobbying by the American Tennis Association and former tennis player Alice Marble forced the U.S. Tennis Association’s hand and Gibson became the first African American to compete in the U.S. Nationals. Help us transcribe her 1957 Wightman Cup medal and several congratulatory telegrams so that we can learn how others described this fascinating woman in their own words.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Telegram to Althea Gibson from John Cashmore

In 1959, Althea Gibson’s autobiography “I Always Wanted to Be Somebody” hit the shelves. According to the NY Times Book Review, “you can read all about the girl from Harlem they call the Jackie Robinson of tennis. Her book is amazingly candid…The language is the language Althea uses, and the frankness with which she speaks of her life is not only refreshing but fascinating.” Gibson was one of the most formidable sportswomen of the mid-20th century. She was the number-one-ranked female tennis player in the world in 1957 and 1958, a two-time Wimbledon ladies singles champion, two-time U.S. Open ladies singles champion, winner of multiple doubles and mixed doubles tournaments, and a professional golfer. Gibson took to tennis as a teen and despite her skill was often prohibited from playing in elite tournaments because of her race. In 1950, lobbying by the American Tennis Association and former tennis player Alice Marble forced the U.S. Tennis Association’s hand and Gibson became the first African American to compete in the U.S. Nationals. Help us transcribe her 1957 Wightman Cup medal and several congratulatory telegrams so that we can learn how others described this fascinating woman in their own words.

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2 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Telegram to Althea Gibson from Ray Robinson

In 1959, Althea Gibson’s autobiography “I Always Wanted to Be Somebody” hit the shelves. According to the NY Times Book Review, “you can read all about the girl from Harlem they call the Jackie Robinson of tennis. Her book is amazingly candid…The language is the language Althea uses, and the frankness with which she speaks of her life is not only refreshing but fascinating.” Gibson was one of the most formidable sportswomen of the mid-20th century. She was the number-one-ranked female tennis player in the world in 1957 and 1958, a two-time Wimbledon ladies singles champion, two-time U.S. Open ladies singles champion, winner of multiple doubles and mixed doubles tournaments, and a professional golfer. Gibson took to tennis as a teen and despite her skill was often prohibited from playing in elite tournaments because of her race. In 1950, lobbying by the American Tennis Association and former tennis player Alice Marble forced the U.S. Tennis Association’s hand and Gibson became the first African American to compete in the U.S. Nationals. Help us transcribe her 1957 Wightman Cup medal and several congratulatory telegrams so that we can learn how others described this fascinating woman in their own words.

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100% Complete

2 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Telegram to Althea Gibson from Robert Walter Johnson

In 1959, Althea Gibson’s autobiography “I Always Wanted to Be Somebody” hit the shelves. According to the NY Times Book Review, “you can read all about the girl from Harlem they call the Jackie Robinson of tennis. Her book is amazingly candid…The language is the language Althea uses, and the frankness with which she speaks of her life is not only refreshing but fascinating.” Gibson was one of the most formidable sportswomen of the mid-20th century. She was the number-one-ranked female tennis player in the world in 1957 and 1958, a two-time Wimbledon ladies singles champion, two-time U.S. Open ladies singles champion, winner of multiple doubles and mixed doubles tournaments, and a professional golfer. Gibson took to tennis as a teen and despite her skill was often prohibited from playing in elite tournaments because of her race. In 1950, lobbying by the American Tennis Association and former tennis player Alice Marble forced the U.S. Tennis Association’s hand and Gibson became the first African American to compete in the U.S. Nationals. Help us transcribe her 1957 Wightman Cup medal and several congratulatory telegrams so that we can learn how others described this fascinating woman in their own words.

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