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2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Telegram to Althea Gibson from Trini and Buddy

In 1959, Althea Gibson’s autobiography “I Always Wanted to Be Somebody” hit the shelves. According to the NY Times Book Review, “you can read all about the girl from Harlem they call the Jackie Robinson of tennis. Her book is amazingly candid…The language is the language Althea uses, and the frankness with which she speaks of her life is not only refreshing but fascinating.” Gibson was one of the most formidable sportswomen of the mid-20th century. She was the number-one-ranked female tennis player in the world in 1957 and 1958, a two-time Wimbledon ladies singles champion, two-time U.S. Open ladies singles champion, winner of multiple doubles and mixed doubles tournaments, and a professional golfer. Gibson took to tennis as a teen and despite her skill was often prohibited from playing in elite tournaments because of her race. In 1950, lobbying by the American Tennis Association and former tennis player Alice Marble forced the U.S. Tennis Association’s hand and Gibson became the first African American to compete in the U.S. Nationals. Help us transcribe her 1957 Wightman Cup medal and several congratulatory telegrams so that we can learn how others described this fascinating woman in their own words.

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2 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Testament of pay for Pvt. Edward Carter

A testament of pay for Revolutionary War soldier Edward Carter from 1871. This document certifies Carter’s three-year military service based out of Colchester, Connecticut. Edward Carter (1741–1818) fought in both the French and Indian War and the American Revolution. Carter, his four sons, and several other freemen, enlisted to serve in the War in the Connecticut Army. Carter fought in the battle of Germantown in Philadelphia, participated in the failed defense of Ft. Mifflin on the Delaware, and wintered at Valley Forge with Gen. George Washington. The following year, he participated in the Battle of Monmouth when Washington overtook the British there, and wintered again with Washington at White Plains, where he was reunited with his sons. In 1779, he participated with all four of his sons in the successful overthrow of the British works at Stoney Point near the Hudson River. After this, Carter worked fortifying West Point and was present for the hanging of Major John Andre. He served in New England until the end of the War. Help us transcribe this rare example of an African American soldier fighting in the American Revolutionary War.

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40 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Testimonial Banquet Honoring Reverend Robert Moses Williams

The Zion Baptist Church of Baltimore, Maryland, was founded in 1934 in a vacant theater. The congregation moved to a permanent structure in 1956. In 1957, Rev. Robert Moses Williams became the pastor. This souvenir program is from his 11th anniversary as pastor of the church. Help us transcribe this program and join in as the church celebrates Reverend Williams.

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20 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Testimonial Banquet Honoring Sister Magdalene Sample for More than Fifty Years of Service

Magdalene Sample was an active member of the Second Baptist Church in Long Branch, New Jersey. Help us discover why she was honored at the church's 1974 banquet!

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36 Total Pages 46 Contributing Members

The Black Scholar Vol. 4 No. 2

“The Black Scholar: A Journal of Black Studies and Research” was founded in 1969 by Robert Chrisman and Nathan Hare in San Francisco, California. The Black Scholar offered a place for dialogue among African American scholars, activists, and artists. Essays in the journal recorded, analyzed, and debated various aspects of social, gender, sexuality, and ideology in African Americans life and the efforts made to change them. “The Back Scholar” is still published today and maintains its place as the leading forum for African American politics, culture, and activism in the United States. Help us transcribe this important journal that offers a glimpse into African American politics, life, and community during this period.

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35 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

The Colored American Magazine Vol. XV No. 3

The Colored American Magazine was one of the first monthly magazines created for an African American audience. The magazine featured content relating to arts, education, politics, medicine and business. It also featured articles about black people across the African Diaspora. This issue is one of the last to be published and includes articles such as: “Character Building,” the “New Negro Bank,” “An Example of Negro Manhood,” and “Consumption—Its History and Causes.”

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26 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

The Crisis Soldier's issue

The Crisis is the official magazine of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Founded by W. E. B. Du Bois (editor), Oswald Garrison Villard, J. Max Barber, Charles Edward Russell, Kelly Miller, W. S. Braithwaite, and Mary Dunlop Maclean, The Crisis has been in continuous print since 1910, making it the oldest African American-led publication in the world. The June 1918 “Soldier’s Issue” focuses on African Americans fighting in World War I. Help us transcribe the ads, articles, and images in The Crisis and learn about the experiences of African American soldiers, the opinions of African American thought leaders, and the effects on African American lives during World War I.

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27 Total Pages 71 Contributing Members

The Crisis, Vol. 13, No. 5

The Crisis is the official magazine of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Founded by W. E. B. Du Bois (editor), Oswald Garrison Villard, J. Max Barber, Charles Edward Russell, Kelly Miller, W. S. Braithwaite, and Mary Dunlop Maclean, The Crisis has been in continuous print since 1910, making it one of the oldest African American-focused publications in the world. Named after the popular James Russell Lowe poem, “The Present Crisis,” the Crisis presented articles and essays on civil rights, history, politics, and culture. Help us transcribe the ads, articles, and images in The Crisis and learn about the experiences of African Americans in the early 20th century.

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27 Total Pages 42 Contributing Members

The Crisis, Vol. 14, No. 1

The Crisis is the official magazine of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Founded by W. E. B. Du Bois (editor), Oswald Garrison Villard, J. Max Barber, Charles Edward Russell, Kelly Miller, W. S. Braithwaite, and Mary Dunlop Maclean, The Crisis has been in continuous print since 1910, making it one of the oldest African American-focused publications in the world. Named after the popular James Russell Lowe poem, “The Present Crisis,” the Crisis presented articles and essays on civil rights, history, politics, and culture. Help us transcribe the ads, articles, and images in The Crisis and learn about the experiences of African Americans in the early 20th century.

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27 Total Pages 43 Contributing Members

The Crisis, Vol. 14, No. 2

The Crisis is the official magazine of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Founded by W. E. B. Du Bois (editor), Oswald Garrison Villard, J. Max Barber, Charles Edward Russell, Kelly Miller, W. S. Braithwaite, and Mary Dunlop Maclean, The Crisis has been in continuous print since 1910, making it one of the oldest African American-focused publications in the world. Named after the popular James Russell Lowe poem, “The Present Crisis,” the Crisis presented articles and essays on civil rights, history, politics, and culture. Help us transcribe the ads, articles, and images in The Crisis and learn about the experiences of African Americans in the early 20th century.

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