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27 Total Pages 50 Contributing Members

The Crisis, Vol. 6, No. 4

The Crisis is the official magazine of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Founded by W. E. B. Du Bois (editor), Oswald Garrison Villard, J. Max Barber, Charles Edward Russell, Kelly Miller, W. S. Braithwaite, and Mary Dunlop Maclean, The Crisis has been in continuous print since 1910, making it one of the oldest African American-focused publications in the world. Named after the popular James Russell Lowe poem, “The Present Crisis,” the Crisis presented articles and essays on civil rights, history, politics, and culture. Help us transcribe the ads, articles, and images in The Crisis and learn about the experiences of African Americans in the early 20th century.

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27 Total Pages 44 Contributing Members

The Crisis, Vol. 7, No. 2

The Crisis is the official magazine of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Founded by W. E. B. Du Bois (editor), Oswald Garrison Villard, J. Max Barber, Charles Edward Russell, Kelly Miller, W. S. Braithwaite, and Mary Dunlop Maclean, The Crisis has been in continuous print since 1910, making it one of the oldest African American-focused publications in the world. Named after the popular James Russell Lowe poem, “The Present Crisis,” the Crisis presented articles and essays on civil rights, history, politics, and culture. Help us transcribe the ads, articles, and images in The Crisis and learn about the experiences of African Americans in the early 20th century.

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4 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

The Ethiopian Hebrews (Falashas) In The Western Hemisphere

The Commandment Keepers Ethiopian Hebrew Congregation was founded in Harlem, New York, in 1919. This congregation of black Hebrews believe they were descended from one of the lost tribes of Ancient Israel. This text shows what life was like in Harlem's African American Jewish community. Discover a history of the group's first Rabbi, Wentworth Arthur Matthew, and his grandson, Rabbi David Matthew Dor. Included is a newspaper article from the Journal of the North Shore Jewish Community that elaborates how "Black is beautiful . . . and Jewish, Too".

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7 Total Pages 13 Contributing Members

The Expected Vol. 29 No. 2

The Expected was the official publication of the Virginia Baptist State Convention created at the Virginia Seminary. Printed monthly, it promoted “Spiritual Independence” to its constituents. The Virginia Baptist State Convention began in 1867 to support the formation and operation of African American churches independent of a racially biased Baptist governance. One person who supported this work was Adolphus Humbles, featured on the front of the periodical. He was a self-made man, starting as a factory worker and moving up the ladder of success until he owned his own general store, livery stable, and a grading and paving company. 1957 was a tumultuous time in American history and periodicals like this offered guidance and promoted dialogue among the religious community. Inside, there is an editorial titled “An Educational Emergency” and articles on “The Church and Civic Concern”, “Virginia Seminary Negro History Spotlight”, “The Negro and United States Sectional Strife.” Help us transcribe “The Expected” and discover how African Americans in Lynchburg, Virginia used their faith to interpret important issues of the time.

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78 Total Pages 43 Contributing Members

The Guardian

This final volume of the Homer G. Phillips Hospital School of Nursing’s yearbook, The Guardian, takes a look at the forty-nine year existence of the nursing school and honors the more than one thousand women who trained as nurses there from 1919 to 1968. This yearbook, which belonged to 1947 graduate Pauline Brown Payne, includes photographs of each of the school’s graduating classes as well as autographs and personal notes from many of the school’s graduates.

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11 Total Pages 13 Contributing Members

The Hampton Student Vol. XI No. 3

Student-led newspapers are a time-honored tradition at colleges and universities around the country. Learn more about Hampton University, Booker T. Washington’s alma mater, by transcribing the April 1921 edition of The Hampton Student. This edition of the student and alumni newspaper looks into Hampton’s athletic programs.

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56 Total Pages 0 Contributing Members

The Liberator

The Liberator (1831-1865) was the most widely circulated anti-slavery newspaper during the antebellum period and throughout the Civil War. It was published and edited in Boston by William Lloyd Garrison, a leading white abolitionist and founder of the influential American Anti-Slavery Society. Over the three decades of its publication, The Liberator denounced all people and acts that would prolong slavery including the United States Constitution. Garrison’s condemnation of the Constitution was an incredibly controversial and eventually led to a split with Frederick Douglass. Once referred to as the most aggressive and outspoken abolitionist the world-over, Garrison was decades ahead of most other northern white abolitionists in demanding the immediate emancipation of all people held in bondage and the restoration of the natural rights of enslaved persons. Garrison’s nature attracted him followers, lovingly called “Garrisonians,” but also many more detractors. Throughout his tenure as editor of The Liberator, his vitriolic criticisms of all people and institutions he saw as responsible for slavery gained him many threats and attempts against his life, including a $5000 (now valued at over $150,000) bounty on his head in Georgia. Garrison’s abolitionism, as well as his support of women’s rights for equality, were driven by the moral imperative to ensure that all people would truly be equal. The Liberator, whose readership was predominantly free blacks in the northern states, officially ended its run in 1865 when the Civil War ended. At the close of the paper’s run, Garrison declared, “my vocation as an abolitionist is ended.” He then turned his attention to women’s suffrage, pacifism, and condemning the post-Reconstruction actions of southern states against blacks. Help us to transcribe these issues of The Liberator and commemorate one of the major forces in the cause for abolition.

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7 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

The Literary Corner: A Comparative Analysis of African and Afro American Literature with Mildred Hill and the Series Conclusion

As an undergraduate student at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Brooks B. Robinson produced a 26-part radio series in 1977–1978, covering a variety of topics about African and African American literature. The Literary Corner: Black Writers of the World was broadcast on Wisconsin public radio. Robinson worked with professors in the department of African Languages and Literature and Afro American Studies and hosted each of the 15-minute radio programs. The programs included interviews and reading with professors and authors. The program tapes illustrate the kind of scholarly attention African and African American literature was receiving during the growth of African American studies departments in American colleges and universities. Help us transcribe these tape recordings to learn about African American literature and hear the author’s voices as they read their own works.

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7 Total Pages 24 Contributing Members

The Literary Corner: Dennis Brutus’ Life and Works (side b)

As an undergraduate student at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Brooks B. Robinson produced a 26-part radio series in 1977–1978, covering a variety of topics about African and African American literature. The Literary Corner: Black Writers of the World was broadcast on Wisconsin public radio. Robinson worked with professors in the department of African Languages and Literature and Afro American Studies and hosted each of the 15-minute radio programs. The programs included interviews and reading with professors and authors. The program tapes illustrate the kind of scholarly attention African and African American literature was receiving during the growth of African American studies departments in American colleges and universities. Help us transcribe these tape recordings to learn about African American literature and hear the author’s voices as they read their own works.

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7 Total Pages 13 Contributing Members

The Literary Corner: Edward Brathwaite's Life and Works (side b)

As an undergraduate student at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Brooks B. Robinson produced a 26-part radio series in 1977–1978, covering a variety of topics about African and African American literature. The Literary Corner: Black Writers of the World was broadcast on Wisconsin public radio. Robinson worked with professors in the department of African Languages and Literature and Afro American Studies and hosted each of the 15-minute radio programs. The programs included interviews and reading with professors and authors. The program tapes illustrate the kind of scholarly attention African and African American literature was receiving during the growth of African American studies departments in American colleges and universities. Help us transcribe these tape recordings to learn about African American literature and hear the author’s voices as they read their own works.

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