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7 Total Pages 21 Contributing Members

The Literary Corner: Ron Karenga’s Life and Works (side a)

As an undergraduate student at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Brooks B. Robinson produced a 26-part radio series in 1977–1978, covering a variety of topics about African and African American literature. The Literary Corner: Black Writers of the World was broadcast on Wisconsin public radio. Robinson worked with professors in the department of African Languages and Literature and Afro American Studies and hosted each of the 15-minute radio programs. The programs included interviews and reading with professors and authors. The program tapes illustrate the kind of scholarly attention African and African American literature was receiving during the growth of African American studies departments in American colleges and universities. Help us transcribe these tape recordings to learn about African American literature and hear the author’s voices as they read their own works.

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7 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

The Literary Corner: Sonia Sanchez’s Life and Work (side a)

As an undergraduate student at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Brooks B. Robinson produced a 26-part radio series in 1977–1978, covering a variety of topics about African and African American literature. The Literary Corner: Black Writers of the World was broadcast on Wisconsin public radio. Robinson worked with professors in the department of African Languages and Literature and Afro American Studies and hosted each of the 15-minute radio programs. The programs included interviews and reading with professors and authors. The program tapes illustrate the kind of scholarly attention African and African American literature was receiving during the growth of African American studies departments in American colleges and universities. Help us transcribe these tape recordings to learn about African American literature and hear the author’s voices as they read their own works.

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100% Complete

7 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

The Literary Corner: Vernon February’s Life and Works (side a)

As an undergraduate student at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Brooks B. Robinson produced a 26-part radio series in 1977–1978, covering a variety of topics about African and African American literature. The Literary Corner: Black Writers of the World was broadcast on Wisconsin public radio. Robinson worked with professors in the department of African Languages and Literature and Afro American Studies and hosted each of the 15-minute radio programs. The programs included interviews and reading with professors and authors. The program tapes illustrate the kind of scholarly attention African and African American literature was receiving during the growth of African American studies departments in American colleges and universities. Help us transcribe these tape recordings to learn about African American literature and hear the author’s voices as they read their own works.

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3 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

The Mount Carmel Bulletin Vol. 2 No. 83

The Mount Carmel Baptist Church was founded in 1876 and was made up of former members of Washington, D.C.'s Second Baptist Church. The congregation worshiped in several locations in Northwest Washington before permanently settling in 1914 in the Mount Vernon Triangle neighborhood. The church sent out bulletins to keep the congregation informed about what was going on in the community. By helping us to transcribe this bulletin, you can learn about the church's Summer Bible School, read a letter from the pastor, and find out what a Hat Rally Day is!

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4 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

The Nation's Prayer Call Vol. 2 No. 4

Zion Baptist Church was organized in 1842 in Cincinnati, Ohio, and was one of the locations that actively aided fugitive slaves through the Underground Railroad. In 1867, the congregation built one of the first brick churches owned by African Americans in Cincinnati. Between the years of 1913 and 1926, almost 1,100 new members were added. This copy of “The Nation’s Prayer Call” from 1956 features an article on Baptists and integration, as well as several other articles. Help us transcribe this newsletter to find out why the author of the article thought that Baptists should not vote against integration.

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27 Total Pages 33 Contributing Members

The Negro Motorist Green Book

The Negro Motorist Green Book was a guidebook for African American travelers that provided a list of hotels, boarding houses, taverns, restaurants, service stations and other establishments throughout the country that served African Americans patrons. Victor H. Green published it annually from 1936 to 1966 when discrimination against African Americans was widespread. During this period, African Americans faced racial prejudice, price gouging and physical violence while traveling around the United States. The information included in The Negro Motorist Green Book helped increase their safety and treatment. **Note: If you encounter columns, please transcribe them like this: --- | --- column one header | column two header column one detail | column two detail Interested in learning more about the Green Book? Check out these interactives! The University Libraries Digital Collection, The Negro Travelers' Green Book New York Public Library, Navigating the Green Book

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3 Total Pages 22 Contributing Members

The North Star Vol. I No. 37

Frederick Douglass was born in 1808 as Frederick August Washington Bailey, the son of an enslaved woman and possibly her white enslaver in Maryland. Douglass emancipated himself at the age of 20. Over the course of his life, he shared his experiences of enslavement in three autobiographies. Douglass was a leader of the abolition movement, fighting against slavery through speeches and writings. He passed away in 1874 at his home in Washington D.C. The North Star, later called Frederick Douglass' Paper, was an antislavery newspaper published by Frederick Douglass. First published on December 3, 1847, using funds Douglass earned during a speaking tour in Great Britain and Ireland, The North Star soon developed into one of the most influential African American antislavery publications of the pre-Civil War era. The name of the newspaper paid homage to the fact that escaping slaves used the North Star in the night sky to guide them to freedom. The paper was published in Rochester, New York, a city known for its opposition to slavery. The motto of the newspaper was, "Right is of no sex--Truth is of no color--God is the Father of us all, and we are brethren." Published weekly, The North Star was four pages long and sold by subscription at a cost of $2.00 per year to more than 4,000 readers in the United States, Europe, and the West Indies. The first of its four pages focused on current events having to do with abolitionist issues; pages two and three included editorials, letters from readers, articles, poetry, and book reviews; the fourth page was devoted to advertisements. In the paper, Douglass wrote with great feeling about what he saw as the huge gap between what Americans claimed to be their Christian beliefs and the prejudice and discrimination he witnessed. This issue, published September 8, 1848, contains several anti-slavery essays and letters, including a letter from Douglass to his previous enslaver Thomas Auld, titled [To My Old Master], as well as a critique of the Liberian colonization movement, news of the rebellion in Ireland, poetry, notices of anti-slavery society meetings around the region, and general advertisements.

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2 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Theater Poster for Lovers of Bourbon, 1856

Ira Aldridge, a legend of the stage, was one of the most celebrated thespians of the nineteenth century. This theater poster features Aldridge as one of the stars in the 1856 production of Lovers of Bourbon. Transcribe the advertisement for this romantic melodrama to learn more about Aldridge’s performance.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Ticket stub for the 1936 Berlin Summer Olympics

The 1936 Summer Olympics was an international multi-sport event held in Berlin, Germany, under the Nazi Regime. The games were the first to be televised, and radio broadcasts reached forty-one countries. Adolf Hitler, Chancellor of Germany, saw the Games as an opportunity to promote his government and ideals of racial supremacy. After threats of boycotts from other nations, he decided to allow Jewish people and people of color to participate in the Olympics. Eighteen African American athletes participated in the games, including track and field star Jesse Owens. During the games, Owens won four gold medals in sprint and long jump events and became the most successful athlete to compete in Berlin. Owens managed to break or equal nine Olympic records while also setting three world records. Help us transcribe this ticket for the August 9, 1936, track and field events where Jesse Owens won his fourth gold medal in the 4x100 meter sprint relay.

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2 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Ticket to a championship boxing match between Joe Louis and Jim Braddock

Economic despair and widespread unemployment during the Great Depression lead many Americans to seek inspiration and hope in the world of sports. When boxer Joe Louis burst onto the scene in the mid-1930s he became a symbol of pride for African Americans. The 1937 fight between Joe Louis and James Braddock began an unprecedented winning streak by Louis that included a 12-year run as champion, defeating 25 challengers. Help us transcribe this ticket for the 1937 fight between Louis and Braddock for the undisputed heavyweight championship of the world.

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