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63 Total Pages 20 Contributing Members

What the Graduates of Lincoln Institute are Doing, 1906

Using photographs and biographies, this book highlights the achievements of some of the most notable graduates from Lincoln University in Missouri. Help us transcribe this book and learn more about the university’s earliest graduates.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Whitney M. Young Jr. award received by Norma Merrick Sklarek

Explore the connection between activism and architecture by transcribing this Whitney M. Young Jr. Award. In 1968, Young (1921 - 1971) delivered the keynote speech at the American Institute of Architects annual convention. The speech challenged the field to engage with social issues. Architect Norma Sklarek (1926 - 2012) received this award for her career of dedicated service as the “Rosa Parks of Architecture.” Sklarek was a pioneering African American architect and one of the first licensed female architects in the country.

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2 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

Wightman Cup Medal

In 1959, Althea Gibson’s autobiography “I Always Wanted to Be Somebody” hit the shelves. According to the NY Times Book Review, “you can read all about the girl from Harlem they call the Jackie Robinson of tennis. Her book is amazingly candid…The language is the language Althea uses, and the frankness with which she speaks of her life is not only refreshing but fascinating.” Gibson was one of the most formidable sportswomen of the mid-20th century. She was the number-one-ranked female tennis player in the world in 1957 and 1958, a two-time Wimbledon ladies singles champion, two-time U.S. Open ladies singles champion, winner of multiple doubles and mixed doubles tournaments, and a professional golfer. Gibson took to tennis as a teen and despite her skill was often prohibited from playing in elite tournaments because of her race. In 1950, lobbying by the American Tennis Association and former tennis player Alice Marble forced the U.S. Tennis Association’s hand and Gibson became the first African American to compete in the U.S. Nationals. Help us transcribe her 1957 Wightman Cup medal and several congratulatory telegrams so that we can learn how others described this fascinating woman in their own words.

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19 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Wilberforce versus Tuskegee College Football Program

College football game day is an iconic part of American culture. Each team and its fan bases have their own set of traditions and events. This program from a 1944 game between Tuskegee Institute and Wilberforce University is not any different. Filled with photographs and fight songs. The program represents two of the early football powerhouses at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Help us transcribe and get into the game day spirit.

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3 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Wooden clapper from the Cotton Club promoting Ethel Waters

The Cotton Club was Harlem’s premier nightclub in the 1920s and 1930s. While the performers were black, the club only permitted white audiences. In 1933, singer Ethel Waters accompanied by the Duke Ellington Orchestra introduced Harold Arlen and Ted Koehler’s song "Stormy Weather." Her rendition received rave reviews and prompted Irving Berlin to cast her in his musical revue, “As Thousands Cheer,” making her the first African American woman to receive top billing with her white co-stars on Broadway. Objects such as clappers and knockers were commonly found in nightclubs. They were used to make noise or acknowledge a great performance and could also be taken home as souvenirs from the evening.

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