Browse Projects

Prevnext

100% Complete

2 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Norma Merrick Sklarek Archive, Series 8: The American Institute of Architects Certificate of Fellowship Norma Merrick Sklarek

Norma Merrick Sklarek (1926–2012) was a renowned architect and a woman of firsts who broke racial and gender barriers earning her place in the male-dominated world of architecture. Sklarek was the first African American woman licensed to practice architecture in New York and California and the first Black woman member and fellow of the American Institute of Architects. Sklarek worked for numerous architectural firms and in 1985 she founded her own women-led business, Siegel, Sklarek, and Diamond, the first of its kind. She led large scale projects including the Fox Plaza, World Finance Center, United States Embassy in Tokyo, Japan, The Mall of America, and Terminal One at Los Angeles International Airport. The Sklarek archival collection offers an in-depth view of Sklarek’s life and career, including family records, resumes, business ephemera, photographs, correspondence, publications, clippings, architectural drawings, and awards. Help us transcribe this collection that highlights the prestigious career of Norma Merrick Sklarek and discover how she paved the way for future women and African American architects.

Go

100% Complete

2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Norma Merrick Sklarek Archive, Series 8: The American Institute of Architects Los Angeles Chapter Presidential Honoree 2007...

Norma Merrick Sklarek (1926–2012) was a renowned architect and a woman of firsts who broke racial and gender barriers earning her place in the male-dominated world of architecture. Sklarek was the first African American woman licensed to practice architecture in New York and California and the first Black woman member and fellow of the American Institute of Architects. Sklarek worked for numerous architectural firms and in 1985 she founded her own women-led business, Siegel, Sklarek, and Diamond, the first of its kind. She led large scale projects including the Fox Plaza, World Finance Center, United States Embassy in Tokyo, Japan, The Mall of America, and Terminal One at Los Angeles International Airport. The Sklarek archival collection offers an in-depth view of Sklarek’s life and career, including family records, resumes, business ephemera, photographs, correspondence, publications, clippings, architectural drawings, and awards. Help us transcribe this collection that highlights the prestigious career of Norma Merrick Sklarek and discover how she paved the way for future women and African American architects.

Go

100% Complete

1 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Page 53 from Harper's Weekly with an article about John W. Menard

Reconstruction—the period following the Civil War—was a revolutionary political, social, and economic movement that reshaped the United States in profound and lasting ways. It manifested the aspirations and determinations of African Americans, including four million newly freed people, seeking to define themselves as free and equal citizens. The Reconstruction era also exposed deep divisions and clashing visions among Americans about how to rebuild the nation after the end of slavery, compelling Americans to reckon with fundamental questions such as: What is the meaning of freedom and equality? What does it mean to be an American? Who is entitled to the full rights of citizenship? Help us transcribe these records to better understand how newly freed African Americans embraced freedom by establishing families, creating communities, and building new institutions, while fighting against the efforts of white supremacists who rejected—some violently—the idea of equal rights for African Americans.

Go

100% Complete

54 Total Pages 18 Contributing Members

Photograph album of Booker T. Washington High School Queen and King Hornet, 1934–67

Tulsa’s Booker T. Washington High School was founded in 1913. Located in the Greenwood neighborhood, the school served Tulsa’s African American population until it was desegregated in 1973. The school escaped destruction during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre and was used by the American Red Cross as the headquarters for relief activities in the aftermath of the Massacre. Help us transcribe these records to learn more about the resiliency of the Black community in Tulsa in the decades following the 1921 Race Massacre.

Go

100% Complete

1 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

Pinback button for the Scottsboro United Front Defense

Pinback buttons are a statement that lets others know your opinions and feelings on a variety of topics. This button shows support for the Scottsboro Boys. On March 25, 1931, nine African American teenage boys were accused of raping two white women. The case was first heard in Scottsboro, Alabama, in three rushed trials, where the defendants received poor legal representation. All but one of the defendants were convicted of rape and sentenced to death. The International Labor Defense (ILD), the legal arm of the Communist Party USA, took on this case realizing that the fame of the case would spotlight the blatant racism shown against the Scottsboro Boys. The ILD directed a national campaign to help free the teenagers that included rallies, speeches, parades, and demonstrations. The Alabama Supreme Court ruled in favor of the guilty verdict for seven of the eight convictions. The ruling was appealed to the United States Supreme Court in the case Powell v. Alabama Chief Justice John C. Anderson. The Supreme Court ruling decided that the defendants had been denied an impartial jury, fair trial, fair sentencing, and effective counsel, which violated their rights under the Fourteenth Amendment. This ruling was one of the first examples showing that African Americans were denied the rights of a fair impartial trial. The ruling was upheld again in Norris v. Alabama.

Go

100% Complete

2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Pinback button supporting the Scottsboro Boys

Pinback buttons are a statement that lets others know your opinions and feelings on a variety of topics. This button shows support for the Scottsboro Boys. On March 25, 1931, nine African American teenage boys were accused of raping two white women. The case was first heard in Scottsboro, Alabama, in three rushed trials, where the defendants received poor legal representation. All but one of the defendants were convicted of rape and sentenced to death. The International Labor Defense (ILD), the legal arm of the Communist Party USA, took on this case realizing that the fame of the case would spotlight the blatant racism shown against the Scottsboro Boys. The ILD directed a national campaign to help free the teenagers that included rallies, speeches, parades, and demonstrations. The Alabama Supreme Court ruled in favor of the guilty verdict for seven of the eight convictions. The ruling was appealed to the United States Supreme Court in the case Powell v. Alabama Chief Justice John C. Anderson. The Supreme Court ruling decided that the defendants had been denied an impartial jury, fair trial, fair sentencing, and effective counsel, which violated their rights under the Fourteenth Amendment. This ruling was one of the first examples showing that African Americans were denied the rights of a fair impartial trial. The ruling was upheld again in Norris v. Alabama.

Go

100% Complete

29 Total Pages 76 Contributing Members

Playbill for 'Master Harold' …and the boys (2)

One of the time-honored traditions of the theater is the playbill. From local community theaters to Broadway, playbills provide the audience with information about the story being told on stage and the artists who bring it to life. After the show, playbills often become cherished souvenirs. "Playbill," a monthly magazine distributed at major theaters in New York and nationwide, presents details about particular productions along with articles about current happenings in the theater world. The Museum's collection of playbills, which spans from the nineteenth century to the present, offers insight into the roles African Americans have played in the development of American theater as actors, playwrights, directors, producers, costume designers, choreographers, and more. Help us transcribe this Playbill to discover and share the history of African Americans taking the stage.

Go

100% Complete

43 Total Pages 47 Contributing Members

Playbill for ‘Master Harold’ …and the boys

One of the time-honored traditions of the theater is the playbill. From local community theaters to Broadway, playbills provide the audience with information about the story being told on stage and the artists who bring it to life. After the show, playbills often become cherished souvenirs. "Playbill," a monthly magazine distributed at major theaters in New York and nationwide, presents details about particular productions along with articles about current happenings in the theater world. The Museum's collection of playbills, which spans from the nineteenth century to the present, offers insight into the roles African Americans have played in the development of American theater as actors, playwrights, directors, producers, costume designers, choreographers, and more. Help us transcribe this Playbill from Porgy and Bess to discover and share the history of African Americans taking the stage.

Go

100% Complete

35 Total Pages 51 Contributing Members

Playbill for A Raisin in the Sun with insert essay ‘Sweet Lorraine'

One of the time-honored traditions of the theater is the playbill. From local community theaters to Broadway, playbills provide the audience with information about the story being told on stage and the artists who bring it to life. After the show, playbills often become cherished souvenirs. "Playbill," a monthly magazine distributed at major theaters in New York and nationwide, presents details about particular productions along with articles about current happenings in the theater world. The Museum's collection of playbills, which spans from the nineteenth century to the present, offers insight into the roles African Americans have played in the development of American theater as actors, playwrights, directors, producers, costume designers, choreographers, and more. Help us transcribe this Playbill to discover and share the history of African Americans taking the stage.

Go

100% Complete

21 Total Pages 41 Contributing Members

Playbill for All Over Town

One of the time-honored traditions of the theater is the playbill. From local community theaters to Broadway, playbills provide the audience with information about the story being told on stage and the artists who bring it to life. After the show, playbills often become cherished souvenirs. "Playbill," a monthly magazine distributed at major theaters in New York and nationwide, presents details about particular productions along with articles about current happenings in the theater world. The Museum's collection of playbills, which spans from the nineteenth century to the present, offers insight into the roles African Americans have played in the development of American theater as actors, playwrights, directors, producers, costume designers, choreographers, and more. Help us transcribe this Playbill to discover and share the history of African Americans taking the stage.

Go

Pages