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108 Total Pages 26 Contributing Members

Directory 1914: Bethel Baptist Institutional Church

The Bethel Baptist Institutional Church is one of the oldest Baptist congregations in Florida. Earliest services were held on a plantation 1838. The congregation included many slaves from surrounding plantations who would require a special day pass that allowed them to travel safely to services. During the Civil War, the church building was used as a hospital for the Union Army. After the war, white members of the church attempted to take over the congregation and remove the African American congregants. These African Americans took their case to court where a judge ruled in their favor. Today, the congregation boasts well over fourteen thousand members. Take a look at the 1914 church directory to learn about the history of the organization and the history of the building, as well as the members of the church.

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22 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Document on NOMA regional structure

To diversify the field of architecture, the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA) was founded in 1971. NOMA serves as a community and professional organization for minority architects. Transcribe this document to explore the founding and organization of this unique association.

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30 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Documents from an architecture workshop at Tuskegee University

The Center for Afro-American Architecture at the Tuskegee Institute hosted a planning workshop in 1980. The purpose of the workshop, funded by the National Endowment of the Arts, was to try and develop a National Resource Center on Afro-American Architecture. Architects J. Max Bond (1935 - 2009) and Richard K. Dozier, along with scholars John Vlach and John Warfield, participated in the workshop. Transcribe these documents to learn about the connection between architecture and education.

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2 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

Flier for "Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom" meeting at Enon Baptist Church

Enon Baptist Church was founded in 1889 in Baltimore, Maryland. The church focuses on community involvement and development. Join the church on their 1957 Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom where Dr. Thomas Kilgore, founder of the Los Angeles chapter of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, was one of the key speakers!

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2 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Flier for a Mount Olive Baptist Church rally

The Mt. Olive Baptist Church was founded by Reverend George Brown in 1909 in a stable in Norfolk, Virginia. The church was governed by a mother church but in 1914 petitioned to become an independent body. By 1916, the congregation had grown so much that they had to leave the stable and construct a formal church building. Help us transcribe this 1926 flier to see which churches were invited to the Mt. Olive Baptist Church Pew Rally in Lindenwood.

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2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Flyer for performances of the Chicago Jublilee Singers in Burnley, England

This advertisement is for a series of performances at Fulledge Methodist Church in Burnley, England, by the Chicago Jubilee Singers, a Chicago-based quintet.

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2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Flyer for Shearer Players' Production of Angel Street, 1951

Martha’s Vineyard is known for its leisure activities and summers. From the 1940s to the 1980s, the Shearer Summer Theater, an African American theater company, produced shows for locals and tourists alike. The Shearer Summer Theater was the brainchild of Elizabeth “Liz” White, a dresser on Broadway, who wrote, directed, and even bought a two story house to act as the stage in the 1950s. Help us transcribe this program from a from the Shearer Summer Theater’s production of Angel Street.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Form letter for National Baptist Convention in Chicago

The National Baptist Convention is the largest predominantly African American Christian denomination in the United States, with approximately 31,000 congregations. This 1943 letter includes data gathered by Professor Clynedyke A. Baker, the national music director of the Laymen's Progressive League of the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church. Help us transcribe the letter and learn about the great city of Chicago and Olivet Baptist Church, the oldest African American Baptist church in the city.

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2 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

Frederick Douglass' Paper

Frederick Douglass was born in 1808 as Frederick August Washington Bailey, the son of an enslaved woman and possibly her white enslaver in Maryland. Douglass emancipated himself at the age of 20. Over the course of his life, he shared his experiences of enslavement in three autobiographies. Douglass was a leader of the abolition movement, fighting against slavery through speeches and writings. He passed away in 1874 at his home in Washington D.C. The North Star, later called Frederick Douglass’ Paper, was an antislavery newspaper published by Frederick Douglass. As with The North Star, Frederick Douglass's Paper was a Rochester-based weekly newspaper that focused on antislavery efforts and other social reform causes. Despite Douglass's efforts, The North Star was not a financial success. Douglass earned extra money lecturing and even mortgaged his home in 1848 to keep the newspaper going. By 1851, financial difficulties caused him to merge The North Star with the Liberty Party Paper, a newspaper published by the abolitionist Gerrit Smith. The resulting publication was Frederick Douglass's Paper. Contributors to the paper included Douglass's coeditor Martin Delany, abolitionist Julia Griffiths, Harriet Jacobs, a formerly enslaved woman, and Charles Dickens. Excerpts from Dickens's novel Bleak House appeared in the paper in 1853. Most of the July 28, 1854 issue is devoted to the Edinburgh Anti-Slavery Society. The last page contains a large advertisement: "Call for a National Emigration Convention of Colored Men to be held in Cleveland Ohio," signed in print by Martin R. Delany, and many other prominent African Americans of the day.

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