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2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Poster for a game between the Lima-Ohio Colored All Stars and the White All Star

Economic despair and widespread unemployment during the Great Depression lead many Americans to seek inspiration and hope in the world of sports. Like other sports, baseball, both the Negro leagues and the all-white Major Leagues, was not immune to the effects of the Great Depression. Player salaries dropped and attendance at games declined. All-star games were a way to highlight local talent and promote the game during the Great Depression. Help us transcribe this poster from an all-star game between the "colored all stars" and "white all stars" from Northwestern Ohio and surrounding areas.

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2 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Poster for A Series of Events Endangered: Art and Performance by Men of Color

Marlon T. Riggs (1957 – 1994) was an award winning filmmaker, artist, educator, and gay rights activist. Before dying from AIDS-related complications at age 37, Riggs wrote, produced, and directed eight films and videos. A tenured professor at University of California - Berkely, Riggs was also a scholar interested in identity, politics, censorship, African American cultural production, and documentary film practice. His films addressed questions of cultural memory and race relations in America as well as exploring personal topics such as sexuality and his HIV status. In a celebration of the life of Marlon Riggs and LGBTQ Pride Month, help us transcribe these selections from a collection of artifacts related to Marlon Riggs donated by his former life partner, Jack Vincent. For more information, check out NMAAHC's web portal to explore LGBTQ+ Objects in the NMAAHC Collection.

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2 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Poster for Am I Guilty?

During the segregation era, an independent industry dedicated to the production of “race movies” for African American audiences emerged in response to the exclusion of black artists from Hollywood and to counter the negative, stereotypical representations of African Americans in mainstream movies. Help us transcribe this poster for the 1940 film "Am I Guilty?" to learn more about films produced for black audiences in that era.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Poster for Ebony Parade

During the segregation era, an independent industry dedicated to the production of “race movies” for African American audiences emerged in response to the exclusion of black artists from Hollywood and to counter the negative, stereotypical representations of African Americans in mainstream movies. Help us transcribe this poster for the 1947 film "Ebony Parade" to learn more about films produced for black audiences in the era.

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2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Poster for The Crimson Skull

During the segregation era, an independent industry dedicated to the production of “race movies” for African American audiences emerged in response to the exclusion of black artists from Hollywood and to counter the negative, stereotypical representations of African Americans in mainstream movies. Help us transcribe this poster for the 1922 film "The Crimson Skull" to learn more about films produced for black audiences in the era.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Poster for The Devil's Daughter

During the segregation era, an independent industry dedicated to the production of “race movies” for African American audiences emerged in response to the exclusion of black artists from Hollywood and to counter the negative, stereotypical representations of African Americans in mainstream movies. Help us transcribe this poster for the 1939 film "The Devil's Daughter" to learn more about films produced for black audiences in the 1930s.

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28 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Pre-Centennial Program: 1852-1951

The African Methodist Episcopal Church was founded in 1816 when several black Methodist congregations wanted independence from white Methodists. This program is for the 87th session of the California Conference of the A.M.E. Church. Transcribe the program and learn the words to the "Negro National Anthem" and meet the various clubs, organizations, and staff members of the church!

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8 Total Pages 13 Contributing Members

Program / Menu from the Cotton Club

The Cotton Club was Harlem’s premier nightclub in the 1920s and 1930s. The club featured many of the greatest African American entertainers of the era, including Count Basie, Ella Fitzgerald, Fats Waller, Louis Armstrong, Dizzy Gillespie, Nat King Cole, Billie Holiday, and Ethel Waters. However, while the performers were black, the club only permitted white audiences. Nonetheless, the Cotton Club launched the careers of many African American performers including Fletcher Henderson, who led the first house band in 1923, and Duke Ellington, whose orchestra was the house band from 1927 to 1931. Cab Calloway's orchestra took over for Ellington’s group in 1931 and Jimmie Lunceford’s band followed in 1934. Lena Horne began her career as a chorus girl at the Cotton Club and Bill “Bojangles” Robinson and Sammy Davis Jr. performed as tap dancers. Many of these acts are featured in this program “The Cotton Club Parade: World’s Fair Edition.” Help us transcribe this program and step into a night at one of the most well-known nightclubs in New York.

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3 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Program for "Slave Songs of the South" by the Hampton Colored Students

Reconstruction—the period following the Civil War—was a revolutionary political, social, and economic movement that reshaped the United States in profound and lasting ways. It manifested the aspirations and determinations of African Americans, including four million newly freed people, seeking to define themselves as free and equal citizens. The Reconstruction era also exposed deep divisions and clashing visions among Americans about how to rebuild the nation after the end of slavery, compelling Americans to reckon with fundamental questions such as: What is the meaning of freedom and equality? What does it mean to be an American? Who is entitled to the full rights of citizenship? Help us transcribe these records to better understand how newly freed African Americans embraced freedom by establishing families, creating communities, and building new institutions, while fighting against the efforts of white supremacists who rejected—some violently—the idea of equal rights for African Americans.

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3 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Program for a 90th birthday celebration for Juanita Smith Booker, a survivor of the Tulsa Race Massacre

Educator and activist Eddie Faye Gates, who has been instrumental in recording the history of Black Tulsa and keeping the memory of the Tulsa Race Massacre and its legacy unburied, collected these funeral programs in the 1990s and 2000s. These funeral programs (and one 90th birthday celebration program) for Tulsa Race Massacre survivors and for prominent Black Tulsans help tell a story of the resiliency of Black Tulsans in the aftermath of the 1921 Race Massacre and through the 20th century. Help us transcribe this birthday program to learn more about Black community members in Tulsa.

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