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Radical Members of the South Carolina Legislature, 1868

Reconstruction—the period following the Civil War—was a revolutionary political, social, and economic movement that reshaped the United States in profound and lasting ways. It manifested the aspirations and determinations of African Americans, including four million newly freed people, seeking to define themselves as free and equal citizens. The Reconstruction era also exposed deep divisions and clashing visions among Americans about how to rebuild the nation after the end of slavery, compelling Americans to reckon with fundamental questions such as: What is the meaning of freedom and equality? What does it mean to be an American? Who is entitled to the full rights of citizenship? Help us transcribe these records to better understand how newly freed African Americans embraced freedom by establishing families, creating communities, and building new institutions, while fighting against the efforts of white supremacists who rejected—some violently—the idea of equal rights for African Americans.

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2 Total Pages 16 Contributing Members

Receipt of pay for Pvt. Edward Carter

A receipt of pay for Revolutionary War soldier Edward Carter. This document certifies Carter’s receipt of payment for military services rendered and based out of Colchester, Connecticut. Edward Carter (1741–1818) fought in both the French and Indian War and the American Revolution. Carter, his four sons, and several other freemen, enlisted to serve in the War in the Connecticut Army. Carter fought in the battle of Germantown in Philadelphia, participated in the failed defense of Ft. Mifflin on the Delaware, and wintered at Valley Forge with Gen. George Washington. The following year, he participated in the Battle of Monmouth when Washington overtook the British there, and wintered again with Washington at White Plains, where he was reunited with his sons. In 1779, he participated with all four of his sons in the successful overthrow of the British works at Stoney Point near the Hudson River. After this, Carter worked fortifying West Point and was present for the hanging of Major John Andre. He served in New England until the end of the War. Help us transcribe this rare example of an African American soldier fighting in the American Revolutionary War.

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156 Total Pages 131 Contributing Members

Rouzee Family Papers

This collection of financial papers relate to the plantation operations of several generations of the Rouzee Family in Essex County, Virginia. The papers date from the 1790s through 1860.

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54 Total Pages 49 Contributing Members

Scrapbook about Mary S. Williams and the Tulsa Youth Council of the N.A.A.C.P., 1939–42

William Danforth “W.D.” Williams was a high school student in Tulsa during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. His parents, Loula and John Williams, owned the Dreamland Theater and several other Greenwood businesses that were destroyed in the massacre. These objects chronicle W.D.’s life as a college student and football player at the Hampton Institute, the continued pain and grief his family endured as victims and survivors, and his long career as a teacher at Booker T. Washington High School. Help us transcribe this scrapbook about Mary S. Williams and the Tulsa Youth Council of the N.A.A.C.P. to learn more about W.D. Williams and his family.

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24 Total Pages 34 Contributing Members

Scrapbook compiled by W.D. Williams about Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity, 1954–64

William Danforth “W.D.” Williams was a high school student in Tulsa during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. His parents, Loula and John Williams, owned the Dreamland Theater and several other Greenwood businesses that were destroyed in the massacre. These objects chronicle W.D.’s life as a college student and football player at the Hampton Institute, the continued pain and grief his family endured as victims and survivors, and his long career as a teacher at Booker T. Washington High School. Help us transcribe this scrapbook compiled by W.D. Williams about Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity to learn more about W.D. Williams and his family.

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81 Total Pages 96 Contributing Members

Scrapbook compiled by W.D. Williams while attending Hampton Institute, 1924–28

William Danforth “W.D.” Williams was a high school student in Tulsa during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. His parents, Loula and John Williams, owned the Dreamland Theater and several other Greenwood businesses that were destroyed in the massacre. These objects chronicle W.D.’s life as a college student and football player at the Hampton Institute, the continued pain and grief his family endured as victims and survivors, and his long career as a teacher at Booker T. Washington High School. Help us transcribe this scrapbook compiled by W.D. Williams while attending Hampton Institute to learn more about W.D. Williams and his family.

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2 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Season ticket for the St. Louis Browns baseball team

African Americans have had a complicated relationship with baseball, the “national pastime.” This long history has been characterized by exclusion, innovation, the creation of all-black institutions, struggle, and pioneering successes. The Negro Leagues created opportunities for African Americans to play the game professionally in a segregated nation, but many also looked to the sport as a place where the civil rights cause could be advanced. In 1947 Major League Baseball was integrated when Jackie Robinson signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers, one of the most significant events in the history of African American sport. In 1947, the St. Louis Browns became the third team to integrate Major League Baseball when they signed Hank Thompson. Help us transcribe this broadside and learn more about the role of African Americans in the history of American baseball.

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1 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Sharecropper's agreement between Daniel Weaver and James Crow

Reconstruction—the period following the Civil War—was a revolutionary political, social, and economic movement that reshaped the United States in profound and lasting ways. It manifested the aspirations and determinations of African Americans, including four million newly freed people, seeking to define themselves as free and equal citizens. The Reconstruction era also exposed deep divisions and clashing visions among Americans about how to rebuild the nation after the end of slavery, compelling Americans to reckon with fundamental questions such as: What is the meaning of freedom and equality? What does it mean to be an American? Who is entitled to the full rights of citizenship? Help us transcribe these records to better understand how newly freed African Americans embraced freedom by establishing families, creating communities, and building new institutions, while fighting against the efforts of white supremacists who rejected—some violently—the idea of equal rights for African Americans.

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44 Total Pages 0 Contributing Members

Shearer Summer Theater Collection

Martha’s Vineyard is known for its leisure activities and summers. From the 1940s to the 1980s, the Shearer Summer Theater, an African American theater company, produced shows for locals and tourists alike. The Shearer Summer Theater was the brainchild of Elizabeth “Liz” White, a dresser on Broadway, who directed, and even bought a two story house to act as the stage in the 1950s for the plays. In the 1980s, White completed her first film, a presentation of Othello. Help us transcribe this program from a screening of Liz White’s presentation of Othello at Howard University.

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121 Total Pages 247 Contributing Members

Slavery and Freedom

Have you ever wondered what goes into the making of an exhibition? Here is your chance to contribute to Slavery and Freedom, one of the inaugural exhibitions of the Smithsonian’s newest museum, that National Museum of African American History and Culture. The Slavery and Freedom exhibition explores the founding of the nation through the lens of the African American experience from the development of the Atlantic world in the 15th century up through the Reconstruction Acts following the Civil War. Please join us in transcribing these documents to help uncover the stories of enslaved persons and their resilience, resistance, courage and faith.

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