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2 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

Spanish-language document from the 2008 Obama Virginia campaign office

Voter education and outreach often produce informative materials in various languages to increase voter participation. This is a single page, double-sided Spanish language document from the 2008 Obama campaign field office in Virginia. It highlights how to vote, information about the registration process, types of identification needed to register, and voting poll rights. Help us transcribe this document and learn about political outreach to increase election awareness.

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40 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

Such As I Have

Dennis Comer (D.C.) Washington was the pastor of the Seventeenth Street Baptist Church in Anniston, Alabama, and the executive director of the Sunday School Publication Board of the National Baptist Convention. This book contains sermons from his time as a pastor as well as sermons from the Alabama Baptist State Convention, the Women's Baptist State Convention of Alabama, and the National Baptist Convention, U.S.A., Inc. Help us discover Rev. D.C. Washington's thoughts on "The Regions Beyond" and "Mending Broken Nets."

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Telegram to Althea Gibson from Eleanor Roosevelt

In 1959, Althea Gibson’s autobiography “I Always Wanted to Be Somebody” hit the shelves. According to the NY Times Book Review, “you can read all about the girl from Harlem they call the Jackie Robinson of tennis. Her book is amazingly candid…The language is the language Althea uses, and the frankness with which she speaks of her life is not only refreshing but fascinating.” Gibson was one of the most formidable sportswomen of the mid-20th century. She was the number-one-ranked female tennis player in the world in 1957 and 1958, a two-time Wimbledon ladies singles champion, two-time U.S. Open ladies singles champion, winner of multiple doubles and mixed doubles tournaments, and a professional golfer. Gibson took to tennis as a teen and despite her skill was often prohibited from playing in elite tournaments because of her race. In 1950, lobbying by the American Tennis Association and former tennis player Alice Marble forced the U.S. Tennis Association’s hand and Gibson became the first African American to compete in the U.S. Nationals. Help us transcribe her 1957 Wightman Cup medal and several congratulatory telegrams so that we can learn how others described this fascinating woman in their own words.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Telegram to Althea Gibson from John Cashmore

In 1959, Althea Gibson’s autobiography “I Always Wanted to Be Somebody” hit the shelves. According to the NY Times Book Review, “you can read all about the girl from Harlem they call the Jackie Robinson of tennis. Her book is amazingly candid…The language is the language Althea uses, and the frankness with which she speaks of her life is not only refreshing but fascinating.” Gibson was one of the most formidable sportswomen of the mid-20th century. She was the number-one-ranked female tennis player in the world in 1957 and 1958, a two-time Wimbledon ladies singles champion, two-time U.S. Open ladies singles champion, winner of multiple doubles and mixed doubles tournaments, and a professional golfer. Gibson took to tennis as a teen and despite her skill was often prohibited from playing in elite tournaments because of her race. In 1950, lobbying by the American Tennis Association and former tennis player Alice Marble forced the U.S. Tennis Association’s hand and Gibson became the first African American to compete in the U.S. Nationals. Help us transcribe her 1957 Wightman Cup medal and several congratulatory telegrams so that we can learn how others described this fascinating woman in their own words.

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100% Complete

2 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Telegram to Althea Gibson from Ray Robinson

In 1959, Althea Gibson’s autobiography “I Always Wanted to Be Somebody” hit the shelves. According to the NY Times Book Review, “you can read all about the girl from Harlem they call the Jackie Robinson of tennis. Her book is amazingly candid…The language is the language Althea uses, and the frankness with which she speaks of her life is not only refreshing but fascinating.” Gibson was one of the most formidable sportswomen of the mid-20th century. She was the number-one-ranked female tennis player in the world in 1957 and 1958, a two-time Wimbledon ladies singles champion, two-time U.S. Open ladies singles champion, winner of multiple doubles and mixed doubles tournaments, and a professional golfer. Gibson took to tennis as a teen and despite her skill was often prohibited from playing in elite tournaments because of her race. In 1950, lobbying by the American Tennis Association and former tennis player Alice Marble forced the U.S. Tennis Association’s hand and Gibson became the first African American to compete in the U.S. Nationals. Help us transcribe her 1957 Wightman Cup medal and several congratulatory telegrams so that we can learn how others described this fascinating woman in their own words.

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100% Complete

2 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Telegram to Althea Gibson from Robert Walter Johnson

In 1959, Althea Gibson’s autobiography “I Always Wanted to Be Somebody” hit the shelves. According to the NY Times Book Review, “you can read all about the girl from Harlem they call the Jackie Robinson of tennis. Her book is amazingly candid…The language is the language Althea uses, and the frankness with which she speaks of her life is not only refreshing but fascinating.” Gibson was one of the most formidable sportswomen of the mid-20th century. She was the number-one-ranked female tennis player in the world in 1957 and 1958, a two-time Wimbledon ladies singles champion, two-time U.S. Open ladies singles champion, winner of multiple doubles and mixed doubles tournaments, and a professional golfer. Gibson took to tennis as a teen and despite her skill was often prohibited from playing in elite tournaments because of her race. In 1950, lobbying by the American Tennis Association and former tennis player Alice Marble forced the U.S. Tennis Association’s hand and Gibson became the first African American to compete in the U.S. Nationals. Help us transcribe her 1957 Wightman Cup medal and several congratulatory telegrams so that we can learn how others described this fascinating woman in their own words.

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100% Complete

2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Telegram to Althea Gibson from Trini and Buddy

In 1959, Althea Gibson’s autobiography “I Always Wanted to Be Somebody” hit the shelves. According to the NY Times Book Review, “you can read all about the girl from Harlem they call the Jackie Robinson of tennis. Her book is amazingly candid…The language is the language Althea uses, and the frankness with which she speaks of her life is not only refreshing but fascinating.” Gibson was one of the most formidable sportswomen of the mid-20th century. She was the number-one-ranked female tennis player in the world in 1957 and 1958, a two-time Wimbledon ladies singles champion, two-time U.S. Open ladies singles champion, winner of multiple doubles and mixed doubles tournaments, and a professional golfer. Gibson took to tennis as a teen and despite her skill was often prohibited from playing in elite tournaments because of her race. In 1950, lobbying by the American Tennis Association and former tennis player Alice Marble forced the U.S. Tennis Association’s hand and Gibson became the first African American to compete in the U.S. Nationals. Help us transcribe her 1957 Wightman Cup medal and several congratulatory telegrams so that we can learn how others described this fascinating woman in their own words.

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100% Complete

2 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

Testament of pay for Pvt. Edward Carter

A testament of pay for Revolutionary War soldier Edward Carter from 1871. This document certifies Carter’s three-year military service based out of Colchester, Connecticut. Edward Carter (1741–1818) fought in both the French and Indian War and the American Revolution. Carter, his four sons, and several other freemen, enlisted to serve in the War in the Connecticut Army. Carter fought in the battle of Germantown in Philadelphia, participated in the failed defense of Ft. Mifflin on the Delaware, and wintered at Valley Forge with Gen. George Washington. The following year, he participated in the Battle of Monmouth when Washington overtook the British there, and wintered again with Washington at White Plains, where he was reunited with his sons. In 1779, he participated with all four of his sons in the successful overthrow of the British works at Stoney Point near the Hudson River. After this, Carter worked fortifying West Point and was present for the hanging of Major John Andre. He served in New England until the end of the War. Help us transcribe this rare example of an African American soldier fighting in the American Revolutionary War.

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40 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Testimonial Banquet Honoring Reverend Robert Moses Williams

The Zion Baptist Church of Baltimore, Maryland, was founded in 1934 in a vacant theater. The congregation moved to a permanent structure in 1956. In 1957, Rev. Robert Moses Williams became the pastor. This souvenir program is from his 11th anniversary as pastor of the church. Help us transcribe this program and join in as the church celebrates Reverend Williams.

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20 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Testimonial Banquet Honoring Sister Magdalene Sample for More than Fifty Years of Service

Magdalene Sample was an active member of the Second Baptist Church in Long Branch, New Jersey. Help us discover why she was honored at the church's 1974 banquet!

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