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Colored Veterans of the 15th Regt. 369th Infantry, Marching up Fifth Avenue. New York City

The stereograph was the original virtual reality photograph. The two images, shown from two slightly different perspectives, take on a three-dimensional appearance when looking through a specially designed viewer called a stereoscope. Invented in 1838, the stereograph remained popular for over one hundred years, allowing viewers access to a wide variety of places that could not be seen in person. This includes the scene shown here, titled, V19244 Colored Veterans of the 15th Regt. 369th Infantry, Marching up Fifth Avenue. New York City. Help us transcribe this stereograph and learn more about the infamous “Harlem Hell Fighters” and their role in World War I.

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3 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Commencement announcement for Booker T. Washington High School, 1934

Tulsa’s Booker T. Washington High School was founded in 1913. Located in the Greenwood neighborhood, the school served Tulsa’s African American population until it was desegregated in 1973. The school escaped destruction during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre and was used by the American Red Cross as the headquarters for relief activities in the aftermath of the Massacre. Help us transcribe these records to learn more about the resiliency of the Black community in Tulsa in the decades following the 1921 Race Massacre.

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3 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Commencement announcement for Booker T. Washington High School, 1940

Tulsa’s Booker T. Washington High School was founded in 1913. Located in the Greenwood neighborhood, the school served Tulsa’s African American population until it was desegregated in 1973. The school escaped destruction during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre and was used by the American Red Cross as the headquarters for relief activities in the aftermath of the Massacre. Help us transcribe these records to learn more about the resiliency of the Black community in Tulsa in the decades following the 1921 Race Massacre.

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3 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Commencement program for Booker T. Washington High School, 1922

Tulsa’s Booker T. Washington High School was founded in 1913. Located in the Greenwood neighborhood, the school served Tulsa’s African American population until it was desegregated in 1973. The school escaped destruction during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre and was used by the American Red Cross as the headquarters for relief activities in the aftermath of the Massacre. Help us transcribe these records to learn more about the resiliency of the Black community in Tulsa in the years and decades following the 1921 Race Massacre.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Congratulatory telegram to Althea Gibson from Mary Hardwick Hare

In 1959, Althea Gibson’s autobiography “I Always Wanted to Be Somebody” hit the shelves. According to the NY Times Book Review, “you can read all about the girl from Harlem they call the Jackie Robinson of tennis. Her book is amazingly candid…The language is the language Althea uses, and the frankness with which she speaks of her life is not only refreshing but fascinating.” Gibson was one of the most formidable sportswomen of the mid-20th century. She was the number-one-ranked female tennis player in the world in 1957 and 1958, a two-time Wimbledon ladies singles champion, two-time U.S. Open ladies singles champion, winner of multiple doubles and mixed doubles tournaments, and a professional golfer. Gibson took to tennis as a teen and despite her skill was often prohibited from playing in elite tournaments because of her race. In 1950, lobbying by the American Tennis Association and former tennis player Alice Marble forced the U.S. Tennis Association’s hand and Gibson became the first African American to compete in the U.S. Nationals. Help us transcribe her 1957 Wightman Cup medal and several congratulatory telegrams so that we can learn how others described this fascinating woman in their own words.

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4 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

Constitution of the Lay Organization of the California Conference of the African Methodist Episcopal Church

The Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, San Francisco, was founded in 1852. Help us discover the history of San Francisco's Bethel A.M.E. Church Lay Organization from 1941-1990.

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19 Total Pages 0 Contributing Members

Cpl. Lawrence Leslie McVey Papers

Cpl. Lawrence McVey served during World War I in the 369th Infantry Regiment, better known as the “Harlem Hellfighters.” Due to racial tension within the US Army, the 369th Infantry Regiment was assigned to the French Army for the duration of US involvement in World War I. Formed from the 15th New York National Guard, the 369th was the first African American regiment to reach the battlefields of France and one of the first American units to reach the banks of the Rhine River. The 369th spent more days in front-line trenches than any other American regiment in the war. Corporal McVey, who served for the entirety of the war, was awarded the French Croix de Guerre with Bronze Star and a Purple Heart for his bravery in action while leading an attack on a machine-gun nest during the fight at Séchault on September 29, 1918.

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149 Total Pages 34 Contributing Members

Cpl. Roy Underwood Plummer’s World War I Diary

Roy Underwood Plummer (1896–1966) was born in Washington, D.C., and enlisted in the Army in 1917. Corporal Plummer served in Company C of the 506th Engineer Battalion. Plummer was one of approximately 160,000 African Americans who served as Services of Supply (SOS) troops charged with mainlining the military supply networks in France during the war. After serving in the Army, Plummer attended Howard University Medical School and established a successful practice in Washington, D.C. This Army and Navy diary was made specifically for soldiers serving during World War I. The pre-printed pages include sections to record enlistment and service details, a French-English vocabulary guide, an address log of friends and fellow soldiers, and much more. Plummer’s diary entries discuss several topics including his insights on relations between US and French soldiers and citizens, the 1918 Influenza Pandemic, weather conditions, food and places that he visited, other African American companies and their bands, German prisoners of war, the study of French language by African American soldiers, and the racial conflict between US servicemen. Help us transcribe this rare example of the African American soldier’s experience during World War I.

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Crisis Magazines

W.E.B. Du Bois (1868–1963) was the founding editor of The Crisis, the official publication of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, which presented articles and essays on civil rights, history, politics, and culture. This July 1919 issue is The Crisis’s annual “Education Number,” featuring images, editorials, and articles about African American education. In addition, this issue includes an editorial by Du Bois discussing the treatment of African American soldiers in Europe during the war.

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2 Total Pages 16 Contributing Members

Deed of Sale between William Walker and John and Joan Gunston

This 1685 deed of sale concerns the land holdings of Captain Thomas Gunston in Saint George, Barbados. The land and all assets, including "Negro slaves," are being left to Captain Gunston's niece and nephew. The document describes the boundaries of the plantation and lays out a price of 700 British pounds. Help us transcribe this deed of sale to discover more about how wealth and power are transferred over generations.

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