Browse Projects

Prevnext

100% Complete

2 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

Frederick Douglass' Paper

Frederick Douglass was born in 1808 as Frederick August Washington Bailey, the son of an enslaved woman and possibly her white enslaver in Maryland. Douglass emancipated himself at the age of 20. Over the course of his life, he shared his experiences of enslavement in three autobiographies. Douglass was a leader of the abolition movement, fighting against slavery through speeches and writings. He passed away in 1874 at his home in Washington D.C. The North Star, later called Frederick Douglass’ Paper, was an antislavery newspaper published by Frederick Douglass. As with The North Star, Frederick Douglass's Paper was a Rochester-based weekly newspaper that focused on antislavery efforts and other social reform causes. Despite Douglass's efforts, The North Star was not a financial success. Douglass earned extra money lecturing and even mortgaged his home in 1848 to keep the newspaper going. By 1851, financial difficulties caused him to merge The North Star with the Liberty Party Paper, a newspaper published by the abolitionist Gerrit Smith. The resulting publication was Frederick Douglass's Paper. Contributors to the paper included Douglass's coeditor Martin Delany, abolitionist Julia Griffiths, Harriet Jacobs, a formerly enslaved woman, and Charles Dickens. Excerpts from Dickens's novel Bleak House appeared in the paper in 1853. Most of the July 28, 1854 issue is devoted to the Edinburgh Anti-Slavery Society. The last page contains a large advertisement: "Call for a National Emigration Convention of Colored Men to be held in Cleveland Ohio," signed in print by Martin R. Delany, and many other prominent African Americans of the day.

Go

100% Complete

250 Total Pages 41 Contributing Members

Hampton Classes, 1871-1898

In 1871, Hampton Institute graduated its first class comprised of five women and fourteen men. Between 1871 and 1898 the sizes of the graduating classes at Hampton continued to grow. Listed here are the names of every person to graduate from Hampton Institute between 1871 and 1898. Included in this reference book are two of Hampton’s most famous alumni: Booker T. Washington (founder of Tuskegee Institute) and Robert Sengstacke Abbott (founder of the Chicago Defender). Help us transcribe this book and let us know if you find any other notable alumni on its pages.

Go

100% Complete

2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Handbill advertising a punch card event at A.M.E. Zion Church Stony Brook

The African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church was established in 1821, when African American members of the congregation of John Street Methodist Church in Harlem, New York, left due to racial segregation. Harriett Tubman and Frederick Douglass were both members of the A.M.E. Zion Church, which served as a place of refuge on the Underground Railroad. Today, the church operates multiple churches, two junior colleges, and Livingstone College in Salisbury, North Carolina. The church has often been used as a gathering for friends and family. This handbill is an advertisement for a benefit event at the A.M.E. Zion Church in Stony Brook, New York. Help us transcribe and discover what activities they participated in.

Go

100% Complete

2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Handbill for a performance by the Fisk Jubilee Singers

Frederick Douglass was born in 1808 as Frederick August Washington Bailey, the son of an enslaved woman and possibly her white enslaver in Maryland. Douglass emancipated himself at the age of 20. Over the course of his life, he shared his experiences of enslavement in three autobiographies. Douglass was a leader of the abolition movement, fighting against slavery through speeches and writings. He passed away in 1874 at his home in Washington D.C. The Fisk Jubilee Singers were an African American a capella ensemble established at Fisk University in 1871, known for singing spirituals. In 2002, the Library of Congress honored their 1909 recording of "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot" by adding it in the United States National Recording Registry. The song on this handbill was written by Frederick Douglass while he was enslaved. The other side of the handbill has a letter from Samuel Clemens, better known as Mark Twain, about how much he enjoyed the Singers' performances. Help us transcribe this handbill and learn more about music's importance in America's history.

Go

100% Complete

10 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Handwritten notes for a speech by Harold Williams as NOMA president

Harold L. Williams (1924 - 2015) was a distinguished architect based out of Southern California. Williams wanted to develop a sense of community among African American architects so he was one of the founders of the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA) in 1971. Williams gave this speech while serving as president of NOMA. Transcribe this speech to learn about the development and work of this group.

Go

100% Complete

25 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

How Hebrews Became Jews

Although born in Panama, Jose V. Malcioln traced his ancestors to a Moroccan Hebrew king. His faith led him to publish this pamphlet on the history of the Hebrew people and to demonstrate that race is not a deterrent to kinship among the faith. Malcioln views the Jewish people as a family and when one sect has a lower status, it brings down the entire group. This pamphlet includes short essays by Malcioln and photographs of the Ethiopian Hebrew Congregation in Harlem, New York, taken by Lloyd Yearwood. Help us transcribe this text and learn about an often unknown but dedicated sect of Judaism.

Go

100% Complete

2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Invitation to a hat rally at Macedonia Baptist Church

In 1872, a Sunday School was started in a stable in Baltimore, Maryland. A group of worshipers formed and the stable was remodeled to add floors and seats. The first formal church meeting was held in September 1874. The congregation was racially diverse, as it included a number of invited white Baptists. A few months later, a council approved the worshipers' mission of becoming a church. Take a night off and join the Ladies Missionary Society of Macedonia Baptist Church at their Hat Rally! Help us transcribe this advertisement for the event.

Go

100% Complete

6 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

J'ai Deux Amours

"J'ai Deux Amours," which translates to “I have two loves,” was performed by Josephine Baker in the 1930s. The 1930 piece was written by Géo Koger and Henri Varna with music by Vincent Scotto. Entirely in French, the song was first performed in the Casino de Paris. The song describes her two loves, “Mon pays et Paris,” which translates into my country and Paris. However, there is some disagreement as to whether the country she refers to is America or France. Help us transcribe the lyrics to this song to discover the music of the 1930s.

Go

100% Complete

123 Total Pages 43 Contributing Members

James Baldwin Collection

James Baldwin (1924-1987) spent most of his life speaking out on the issues of race relations and racial discrimination in America. Through numerous bestselling novels, plays, and essays written during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, Baldwin addressed themes of racial and sexual oppression by connecting many of his personal experiences to national and international issues. Although Baldwin spent the bulk of his career living and working in Europe, mainly France and Turkey, he often returned to the United States to take part in events surrounding the American Civil Rights Movement. Help us transcribe the personal objects and letters in this collection that document Baldwin’s life as an expatriate writer and activist in the second half of the twentieth century.

Go

Pages