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3 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Promotional material for Liz White's presentation of Othello, 1980

Martha’s Vineyard is known for its leisure activities and summers. From the 1940s to the 1980s, the Shearer Summer Theater, an African American theater company, produced shows for locals and tourists alike. The Shearer Summer Theater was the brainchild of Elizabeth “Liz” White, a dresser on Broadway, who directed, and even bought a two story house to act as the stage in the 1950s for the plays. Help us transcribe this promotional material from Liz White’s presentation of Othello.

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12 Total Pages 28 Contributing Members

Slavery and Freedom

Have you ever wondered what goes into the making of an exhibition? Here is your chance to contribute to Slavery and Freedom, one of the inaugural exhibitions of the Smithsonian’s newest museum, that National Museum of African American History and Culture. The Slavery and Freedom exhibition explores the founding of the nation through the lens of the African American experience from the development of the Atlantic world in the 15th century up through the Reconstruction Acts following the Civil War. Please join us in transcribing these documents to help uncover the stories of enslaved persons and their resilience, resistance, courage and faith.

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9 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Some Glimpses of Alabama State

Have you ever wondered what college was like in the 1930s? Take a look at the photos and text in this 1937 Alabama State yearbook and help us transcribe the pages to find out.

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23 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Soul City Portfolio

Soul City, North Carolina is a planned community initiated by Floyd McKissick with funding from the Department of Housing and Urban Development in 1969. He envisioned a town that would offer African American families affordable housing, jobs and healthcare. The town was partially constructed but never finished. This portfolio details residential, industrial, commercial and business plans for the town.

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20 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Southern Christian Leadership Conference Citizenship Workbook

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) is a civil rights organization that promotes racial equality and social justice through non-violent action. Established in 1957, right after the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the organization is well-known for coordinating the activities of local organizations protesting segregation using boycotts, marches, sit-ins and other non-violent tactics. The SCLC was also deeply involved in economic justice and voter registration campaigns. Citizenship schools were established throughout the South to teach adults English literacy and civics so they could pass voter registration tests. This workbook, owned by Kitt E. Kennedy, Sr., of Winnsboro, SC, illustrates the lessons taught to fuel the political activism of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950's and 1960's. Please help us transcribe the handbook and learn more about the SCLC's efforts.

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35 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

The Colored American Magazine Vol. XV No. 3

The Colored American Magazine was one of the first monthly magazines created for an African American audience. The magazine featured content relating to arts, education, politics, medicine and business. It also featured articles about black people across the African Diaspora. This issue is one of the last to be published and includes articles such as: “Character Building,” the “New Negro Bank,” “An Example of Negro Manhood,” and “Consumption—Its History and Causes.”

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3 Total Pages 41 Contributing Members

The Connecticut Courant, Vol. LXXXVII, No. 4461

This copy of The Connecticut Courant from July 20, 1850 features an advertisement for Augustus Washington’s Daguerrean Gallery in Hartford. Augustus Washington was an African American daguerreotypist in the 1800s and is one of the few with a documented career. He learned how to make daguerreotypes in order to pay for college and he ended up teaching the technique and opening his own studio. Washington eventually moved to Liberia and became a sugarcane grower and a politician. Help us transcribe this issue of the newspaper and learn from Washington’s ad what to wear to get your best picture in the 1800s.

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78 Total Pages 43 Contributing Members

The Guardian

This final volume of the Homer G. Phillips Hospital School of Nursing’s yearbook, The Guardian, takes a look at the forty-nine year existence of the nursing school and honors the more than one thousand women who trained as nurses there from 1919 to 1968. This yearbook, which belonged to 1947 graduate Pauline Brown Payne, includes photographs of each of the school’s graduating classes as well as autographs and personal notes from many of the school’s graduates.

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11 Total Pages 13 Contributing Members

The Hampton Student Vol. XI No. 3

Student-led newspapers are a time-honored tradition at colleges and universities around the country. Learn more about Hampton University, Booker T. Washington’s alma mater, by transcribing the April 1921 edition of The Hampton Student. This edition of the student and alumni newspaper looks into Hampton’s athletic programs.

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4 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

The Liberator, Vol. XV, No. 20

The Liberator (1831-1865) was the most widely circulated anti-slavery newspaper during the antebellum period and throughout the Civil War. It was published and edited in Boston by William Lloyd Garrison, a leading white abolitionist and founder of the influential American Anti-Slavery Society. Over the three decades of its publication, The Liberator denounced all people and acts that would prolong slavery including the United States Constitution. Garrison’s condemnation of the Constitution was an incredibly controversial and eventually led to a split with Frederick Douglass. Once referred to as the most aggressive and outspoken abolitionist the world-over, Garrison was decades ahead of most other northern white abolitionists in demanding the immediate emancipation of all people held in bondage and the restoration of the natural rights of enslaved persons. Garrison’s nature attracted him followers, lovingly called “Garrisonians,” but also many more detractors. Throughout his tenure as editor of The Liberator, his vitriolic criticisms of all people and institutions he saw as responsible for slavery gained him many threats and attempts against his life, including a $5000 (now valued at over $150,000) bounty on his head in Georgia. Garrison’s abolitionism, as well as his support of women’s rights for equality, were driven by the moral imperative to ensure that all people would truly be equal. The Liberator, whose readership was predominantly free blacks in the northern states, officially ended its run in 1865 when the Civil War ended. At the close of the paper’s run, Garrison declared, “my vocation as an abolitionist is ended.” He then turned his attention to women’s suffrage, pacifism, and condemning the post-Reconstruction actions of southern states against blacks. Help us to transcribe these issues of The Liberator and commemorate one of the major forces in the cause for abolition.

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