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72 Total Pages 24 Contributing Members

Diary written by Jessie Greer, 1919

Diaries are an invaluable resource into the lives of individuals at a certain point in time. Jessie Greer, a sixteen-year-old living in Cincinnati, Ohio, kept a dairy in the months following the end of World War I. The diary dates from February 21 to April 14, 1919. Greer’s diary shows an often-overlooked part of the war, how the people who remained at home continued their daily lives as soldiers fought overseas. Greer describes her interactions with family and friends and her work with the YMCA. In an entry on March 10, 1919, Greer describes a homecoming parade of African American soldiers. Help us transcribe this diary and discover what daily life was like for an African American teenager during the World War I era.

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108 Total Pages 26 Contributing Members

Directory 1914: Bethel Baptist Institutional Church

The Bethel Baptist Institutional Church is one of the oldest Baptist congregations in Florida. Earliest services were held on a plantation 1838. The congregation included many slaves from surrounding plantations who would require a special day pass that allowed them to travel safely to services. During the Civil War, the church building was used as a hospital for the Union Army. After the war, white members of the church attempted to take over the congregation and remove the African American congregants. These African Americans took their case to court where a judge ruled in their favor. Today, the congregation boasts well over fourteen thousand members. Take a look at the 1914 church directory to learn about the history of the organization and the history of the building, as well as the members of the church.

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22 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Document on NOMA regional structure

To diversify the field of architecture, the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA) was founded in 1971. NOMA serves as a community and professional organization for minority architects. Transcribe this document to explore the founding and organization of this unique association.

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30 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Documents from an architecture workshop at Tuskegee University

The Center for Afro-American Architecture at the Tuskegee Institute hosted a planning workshop in 1980. The purpose of the workshop, funded by the National Endowment of the Arts, was to try and develop a National Resource Center on Afro-American Architecture. Architects J. Max Bond (1935 - 2009) and Richard K. Dozier, along with scholars John Vlach and John Warfield, participated in the workshop. Transcribe these documents to learn about the connection between architecture and education.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Dr. Evans and Staff in front of St. Luke Hospital

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 1: Photograph of Matilda A. Evans at Oberlin College

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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2 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 1: Report card Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 2: “Clinic Doing Good Work Among Negroes of City: Institution on Harden Street ..."

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 2: City License of Columbia, Columbia S.C. 1929 / Letterhead paper for Dr. M.A. Evans

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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2 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 2: Prescription paper from Dr. M.A. Evans

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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