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31 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

Moslem World & The U.S.A. 2

"Moslem World & the U.S.A." was the first monthly journal about Islam in the United States. This special edition covers October, November, and December 1956. The pamphlet includes stories, editorials, sermons, and news of Muslims in America and throughout the world, including countries such as Egypt, Jordan, and Syria. Help us transcribe this work and take an inside look at Muslim life in America and around the world in the 1950s.

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233 Total Pages 0 Contributing Members

National Baptist Publishing Board Publications

In the midst of the Great Depression, Henry A. Boyd, secretary of the National Baptist Publishing Board submitted the 34th Annual Report of the National Baptist Publishing Board to the chairman and members of the Board. Boyd notes, "We are pleased to report that notwithstanding the unusual financial depression and the shortage of funds, with the unemployment situation, there has been only a slight decrease in the circulation during the past year, of these publications." Help us transcribe this report and learn more about the workings and publications of the National Baptist Publishing Board.

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9 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

Negro Churchmen Speak to White Churchmen

The Federal Council of Churches, an ecumenical association of Protestant denominations in the United States, put together this pamphlet to discuss their mission on the "Church and Minority Peoples." Three of the main topics discussed in the pamphlet are the Christian faith, science, and American democracy. Learn more about these topics and many others while helping us to transcribe this pamphlet.

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72 Total Pages 20 Contributing Members

Negroes and the War

In 1942, the United States Office of War Information (OWI) was created to coordinate information services and deliver propaganda at home and abroad. In an effort to encourage African American support for the war effort, OWI commissioned Chandler Owen to write a booklet that presented arguments in favor of black support for the war effort and to remind African Americans of what they stood to lose should Germany win the war. Well illustrated with dramatic photographs by Eliot Elisofon, OWI published and distributed 2.5 million copies of Negroes and the War to African Americans around the country. This government-produced propaganda demonstrates how the government sought to engage with African Americans to support the war effort in 1942.

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1 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

Pinback button for the Scottsboro United Front Defense

Pinback buttons are a statement that lets others know your opinions and feelings on a variety of topics. This button shows support for the Scottsboro Boys. On March 25, 1931, nine African American teenage boys were accused of raping two white women. The case was first heard in Scottsboro, Alabama, in three rushed trials, where the defendants received poor legal representation. All but one of the defendants were convicted of rape and sentenced to death. The International Labor Defense (ILD), the legal arm of the Communist Party USA, took on this case realizing that the fame of the case would spotlight the blatant racism shown against the Scottsboro Boys. The ILD directed a national campaign to help free the teenagers that included rallies, speeches, parades, and demonstrations. The Alabama Supreme Court ruled in favor of the guilty verdict for seven of the eight convictions. The ruling was appealed to the United States Supreme Court in the case Powell v. Alabama Chief Justice John C. Anderson. The Supreme Court ruling decided that the defendants had been denied an impartial jury, fair trial, fair sentencing, and effective counsel, which violated their rights under the Fourteenth Amendment. This ruling was one of the first examples showing that African Americans were denied the rights of a fair impartial trial. The ruling was upheld again in Norris v. Alabama.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Pinback button supporting the Scottsboro Boys

Pinback buttons are a statement that lets others know your opinions and feelings on a variety of topics. This button shows support for the Scottsboro Boys. On March 25, 1931, nine African American teenage boys were accused of raping two white women. The case was first heard in Scottsboro, Alabama, in three rushed trials, where the defendants received poor legal representation. All but one of the defendants were convicted of rape and sentenced to death. The International Labor Defense (ILD), the legal arm of the Communist Party USA, took on this case realizing that the fame of the case would spotlight the blatant racism shown against the Scottsboro Boys. The ILD directed a national campaign to help free the teenagers that included rallies, speeches, parades, and demonstrations. The Alabama Supreme Court ruled in favor of the guilty verdict for seven of the eight convictions. The ruling was appealed to the United States Supreme Court in the case Powell v. Alabama Chief Justice John C. Anderson. The Supreme Court ruling decided that the defendants had been denied an impartial jury, fair trial, fair sentencing, and effective counsel, which violated their rights under the Fourteenth Amendment. This ruling was one of the first examples showing that African Americans were denied the rights of a fair impartial trial. The ruling was upheld again in Norris v. Alabama.

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35 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

Playbill for Golden Boy

One of the time-honored traditions of the theater is the playbill. From local community theaters to Broadway, playbills provide the audience with information about the story being told on stage and the artists who bring it to life. After the show, playbills often become cherished souvenirs. "Playbill," a monthly magazine distributed at major theaters in New York and nationwide, presents details about particular productions along with articles about current happenings in the theater world. The Museum's collection of playbills, which spans from the nineteenth century to the present, offers insight into the roles African Americans have played in the development of American theater as actors, playwrights, directors, producers, costume designers, choreographers, and more. Help us transcribe this Playbill from Golden Boy to discover and share the history of African Americans taking the stage.

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1,620 Total Pages 0 Contributing Members

Playbills

One of the time-honored traditions of the theater is the playbill. From local community theaters to Broadway, playbills provide the audience with information about the story being told on stage and the artists who bring it to life. After the show, playbills often become cherished souvenirs. "Playbill," a monthly magazine distributed at major theaters in New York and nationwide, presents details about particular productions along with articles about current happenings in the theater world. The Museum's collection of playbills, which spans from the nineteenth century to the present, offers insight into the roles African Americans have played in the development of American theater as actors, playwrights, directors, producers, costume designers, choreographers, and more.

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Subprojects

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2 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

Plywood Panel Mural from Resurrection City

During the Poor People’s Campaign, participants at Resurrection City on the National Mall painted this mural, often referred to as “Hunger’s Wall” on twelve plywood boards. This mural illustrates the interracial nature and diverse concerns of the demonstrators. Vincent deForest, an activist with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) who participated in the Poor People’s Campaign, salvaged this mural after the Resurrection City encampment was shut down. After storing them for decades, deForest donated these panels to the NMAAHC in 2012. The text on this mural is scattered across all twelve panels. To ease transcription, we’ve separated the mural into two sections (top and bottom). You may find it useful to refer to the original image of the mural in its entirety, or other sections of the mural by clicking through this project. Please transcribe the text on the mural as follows: • Don't describe images; please transcribe the text only. • Please start each message on a new line to indicate they are separate/different/unique. • Do not worry about transcribing the messages in any particular order as long as they are all transcribed. Help us transcribe these panels and learn more about the diverse concerns of the participants of the Poor People’s Campaign.

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4 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Pocket watch inscribed to William Lloyd Garrison from George Thompson

William Lloyd Garrison (1805–1879) is best known as the founder of the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1832. The AASS called for immediate emancipation and, acting upon a belief in human equality, accepted men and women, black and white as members. Garrison was also the editor and publisher of The Liberator, a weekly anti-slavery paper that ran from 1831 to 1865 calling for the "immediate and complete emancipation of all slaves" in the United States. In 1832, William Lloyd Garrison met George Thompson a member of the UK Parliament and an anti-slavery orator while traveling in Scotland. Their close relationship led to Garrison naming his son, George Thompson Garrison, after his friend. Thompson returned to the U.S. in 1850 and presented William Lloyd Garrison with this engraved gold watch to commemorate the 20th anniversary of The Liberator.

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