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2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 3: The Family (rear) John - Artie - Myrtle - Jessie (front) DR. Evans - Dozier - Sidney

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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11 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 4: A Brief history of The Evans Clinic 1235 Harden Street COLUMBIA, S.C.

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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100% Complete

6 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 4: A True Likeness: The Black South of Richard Samuel Roberts 1920-1936

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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5 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 4: Martha Schofield Pioneer Negro Educator by Dr. Matilda A. Evans

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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22 Total Pages 20 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 5: "Dr. Matilda Arabella Evans" by Burnett W. Gallman, Jr., M.D [photocopy]

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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100% Complete

2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 5: "Matilda Arabella Evans (1872-1935) Black Doctor gave hope, health to Columbians...

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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100% Complete

10 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 5: Booklet "Hospital and Training for Nurses. Established 1901. Incorporated"[photocopy]

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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100% Complete

12 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 5: Program for "The Inaugural Trumpeter Gala"

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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100% Complete

2 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 5: Title page "Contributions of Black Women to America" [photocopy]

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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100% Complete

4 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 5: Title page of SAGE A Scholarly Journal on Black Women with biography [photocopy]

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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