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2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 5: "Matilda Arabella Evans (1872-1935) Black Doctor gave hope, health to Columbians...

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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10 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 5: Booklet "Hospital and Training for Nurses. Established 1901. Incorporated"[photocopy]

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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12 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 5: Program for "The Inaugural Trumpeter Gala"

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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2 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 5: Title page "Contributions of Black Women to America" [photocopy]

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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4 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 5: Title page of SAGE A Scholarly Journal on Black Women with biography [photocopy]

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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2 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 5: Unknown book page on History of Evans Clinic Association [photocopy]

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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8 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 5: Unveiling of the "South Carolina African-American History Calendar" Bell South

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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52 Total Pages 63 Contributing Members

Ex. doc. (United States. Congress. House), 40th Congress, 2d session, no. 329

Reconstruction—the period following the Civil War—was a revolutionary political, social, and economic movement that reshaped the United States in profound and lasting ways. It manifested the aspirations and determinations of African Americans, including four million newly freed people, seeking to define themselves as free and equal citizens. The Reconstruction era also exposed deep divisions and clashing visions among Americans about how to rebuild the nation after the end of slavery, compelling Americans to reckon with fundamental questions such as: What is the meaning of freedom and equality? What does it mean to be an American? Who is entitled to the full rights of citizenship? Help us transcribe these records to better understand how newly freed African Americans embraced freedom by establishing families, creating communities, and building new institutions, while fighting against the efforts of white supremacists who rejected—some violently—the idea of equal rights for African Americans.

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24 Total Pages 49 Contributing Members

Extension of the Ku Klux Act

Reconstruction—the period following the Civil War—was a revolutionary political, social, and economic movement that reshaped the United States in profound and lasting ways. It manifested the aspirations and determinations of African Americans, including four million newly freed people, seeking to define themselves as free and equal citizens. The Reconstruction era also exposed deep divisions and clashing visions among Americans about how to rebuild the nation after the end of slavery, compelling Americans to reckon with fundamental questions such as: What is the meaning of freedom and equality? What does it mean to be an American? Who is entitled to the full rights of citizenship? Help us transcribe these records to better understand how newly freed African Americans embraced freedom by establishing families, creating communities, and building new institutions, while fighting against the efforts of white supremacists who rejected—some violently—the idea of equal rights for African Americans.

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15 Total Pages 18 Contributing Members

Flash Weekly Newspicture Magazine, February 14, 1938

"Flash" was a weekly newspicture magazine published in Washington, D.C., from June 1937-August 1939. "Flash" was one of a number of periodicals aimed at black audiences during the 1930s that featured images and text about African Americans and African American life during this period. In a 1938 editorial titled "New Year Forecast" the editors wrote, "No longer an experiment, it ["Flash"] will represent the outstanding dynamic and satisfying weekly presentation of the significant drama of American life, with colored men and women in the title roles." This February 14, 1938 issue of "Flash" features photographs by acclaimed Pittsburgh photographer Charles "Teenie" Harris. Help us transcribe this issue of "Flash" to learn more about African American life in the 1930s and see if you can find Teenie Harris' photos throughout.

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