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2 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Circular No. 8 from the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands

Reconstruction—the period following the Civil War—was a revolutionary political, social, and economic movement that reshaped the United States in profound and lasting ways. It manifested the aspirations and determinations of African Americans, including four million newly freed people, seeking to define themselves as free and equal citizens. The Reconstruction era also exposed deep divisions and clashing visions among Americans about how to rebuild the nation after the end of slavery, compelling Americans to reckon with fundamental questions such as: What is the meaning of freedom and equality? What does it mean to be an American? Who is entitled to the full rights of citizenship? Help us transcribe these records to better understand how newly freed African Americans embraced freedom by establishing families, creating communities, and building new institutions, while fighting against the efforts of white supremacists who rejected—some violently—the idea of equal rights for African Americans.

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8 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

Civil Rights Speech of Hon. Alonzo J. Ransier, of South Carolina, in The House of Representatives, February 7, 1874

Reconstruction—the period following the Civil War—was a revolutionary political, social, and economic movement that reshaped the United States in profound and lasting ways. It manifested the aspirations and determinations of African Americans, including four million newly freed people, seeking to define themselves as free and equal citizens. The Reconstruction era also exposed deep divisions and clashing visions among Americans about how to rebuild the nation after the end of slavery, compelling Americans to reckon with fundamental questions such as: What is the meaning of freedom and equality? What does it mean to be an American? Who is entitled to the full rights of citizenship? Help us transcribe these records to better understand how newly freed African Americans embraced freedom by establishing families, creating communities, and building new institutions, while fighting against the efforts of white supremacists who rejected—some violently—the idea of equal rights for African Americans.

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30 Total Pages 23 Contributing Members

Class photo album for a Booker T. Washington High School reunion, Tulsa, July 1978

Tulsa’s Booker T. Washington High School was founded in 1913. Located in the Greenwood neighborhood, the school served Tulsa’s African American population until it was desegregated in 1973. The school escaped destruction during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre and was used by the American Red Cross as the headquarters for relief activities in the aftermath of the Massacre. Help us transcribe these records to learn more about the resiliency of the Black community in Tulsa in the decades following the 1921 Race Massacre.

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4 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Collection box of the Rhode Island Anti-Slavery Society owned by the Garrison family

This cardboard coin collection box was produced by the Rhode Island Anti-Slavery Society. The Society was organized in 1833 and active through the 1850s. The box has a tableau on the front of an enslaved person in chains on his knees surrounded by implements of bondage. Help us transcribe this box showing the important work done by the Abolition societies.

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2 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

Colored Veterans of the 15th Regt. 369th Infantry, Marching up Fifth Avenue. New York City

The stereograph was the original virtual reality photograph. The two images, shown from two slightly different perspectives, take on a three-dimensional appearance when looking through a specially designed viewer called a stereoscope. Invented in 1838, the stereograph remained popular for over one hundred years, allowing viewers access to a wide variety of places that could not be seen in person. This includes the scene shown here, titled, V19244 Colored Veterans of the 15th Regt. 369th Infantry, Marching up Fifth Avenue. New York City. Help us transcribe this stereograph and learn more about the infamous “Harlem Hell Fighters” and their role in World War I.

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3 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Commencement announcement for Booker T. Washington High School, 1934

Tulsa’s Booker T. Washington High School was founded in 1913. Located in the Greenwood neighborhood, the school served Tulsa’s African American population until it was desegregated in 1973. The school escaped destruction during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre and was used by the American Red Cross as the headquarters for relief activities in the aftermath of the Massacre. Help us transcribe these records to learn more about the resiliency of the Black community in Tulsa in the decades following the 1921 Race Massacre.

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3 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Commencement announcement for Booker T. Washington High School, 1940

Tulsa’s Booker T. Washington High School was founded in 1913. Located in the Greenwood neighborhood, the school served Tulsa’s African American population until it was desegregated in 1973. The school escaped destruction during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre and was used by the American Red Cross as the headquarters for relief activities in the aftermath of the Massacre. Help us transcribe these records to learn more about the resiliency of the Black community in Tulsa in the decades following the 1921 Race Massacre.

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3 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Commencement program for Booker T. Washington High School, 1922

Tulsa’s Booker T. Washington High School was founded in 1913. Located in the Greenwood neighborhood, the school served Tulsa’s African American population until it was desegregated in 1973. The school escaped destruction during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre and was used by the American Red Cross as the headquarters for relief activities in the aftermath of the Massacre. Help us transcribe these records to learn more about the resiliency of the Black community in Tulsa in the years and decades following the 1921 Race Massacre.

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2 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Commission signed by Pinckney Pinchback as acting governor of Louisiana

Reconstruction—the period following the Civil War—was a revolutionary political, social, and economic movement that reshaped the United States in profound and lasting ways. It manifested the aspirations and determinations of African Americans, including four million newly freed people, seeking to define themselves as free and equal citizens. The Reconstruction era also exposed deep divisions and clashing visions among Americans about how to rebuild the nation after the end of slavery, compelling Americans to reckon with fundamental questions such as: What is the meaning of freedom and equality? What does it mean to be an American? Who is entitled to the full rights of citizenship? Help us transcribe these records to better understand how newly freed African Americans embraced freedom by establishing families, creating communities, and building new institutions, while fighting against the efforts of white supremacists who rejected—some violently—the idea of equal rights for African Americans.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Congratulatory telegram to Althea Gibson from Mary Hardwick Hare

In 1959, Althea Gibson’s autobiography “I Always Wanted to Be Somebody” hit the shelves. According to the NY Times Book Review, “you can read all about the girl from Harlem they call the Jackie Robinson of tennis. Her book is amazingly candid…The language is the language Althea uses, and the frankness with which she speaks of her life is not only refreshing but fascinating.” Gibson was one of the most formidable sportswomen of the mid-20th century. She was the number-one-ranked female tennis player in the world in 1957 and 1958, a two-time Wimbledon ladies singles champion, two-time U.S. Open ladies singles champion, winner of multiple doubles and mixed doubles tournaments, and a professional golfer. Gibson took to tennis as a teen and despite her skill was often prohibited from playing in elite tournaments because of her race. In 1950, lobbying by the American Tennis Association and former tennis player Alice Marble forced the U.S. Tennis Association’s hand and Gibson became the first African American to compete in the U.S. Nationals. Help us transcribe her 1957 Wightman Cup medal and several congratulatory telegrams so that we can learn how others described this fascinating woman in their own words.

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