Browse Projects

next

100% Complete

4 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

Deed of sale for an enslaved man named John

The history of enslaved persons is often difficult to uncover. Printed material provides us with clues about individuals and their history. This deed records the purchase of an enslaved boy aged seventeen named John sold by Martha A. Briggs to James Roberts in order to pay off a note of $1,200.00 owed by Briggs to H. S. Blood. Help us transcribe this deed and shed light on the stories of not just the institution of slavery, but the individual men, women, and children who helped shape America.

Go

100% Complete

4 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Deed of sale for an enslaved man named Cato

The history of enslaved persons is often difficult to uncover. Printed material provides us with clues about individuals and their history. This deed records the purchase of an enslaved man named Cato sold by J. P. Lapier of Pointe Coupee, Louisiana, an agent for C. E. Girardy & Co. to James Roberts of Jefferson City, Louisiana, on April 28, 1859. The deed indicates Cato was around forty years of age and was accused of running away. Help us transcribe this deed and shed light on the stories of not just the institution of slavery, but the individual men, women, and children who helped shape America.

Go

100% Complete

3 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Deed of sale for an enslaved woman named Cassey

The history of enslaved persons is often difficult to uncover. Printed material provides us with clues about individuals and their history. This deed records the sale of a 40-year-old enslaved woman named Cassey by Mary McCarthey to Fleming C. Cheatham, both of Carroll Parish, Louisiana, on March 3, 1859. The deed was recorded by James W. Draughon, also of Carroll Parish. Help us transcribe this deed and shed light on the stories of not just the institution of slavery, but the individual men, women, and children who helped shape America.

Go

100% Complete

3 Total Pages 20 Contributing Members

Deed of sale for an enslaved man named Pierre

The history of enslaved persons is often difficult to uncover. Printed material provides us with clues about individuals and their history. This deed records the sale of a 25-year-old enslaved man named Pierre by Christian Mehle and Hortaire Inbau to James Roberts in Louisiana on December 8, 1860. The wives of the sellers, Magdalena Doll Mehle and Mary Jane Williams Inbau, were also required to release ownership claims over Pierre. Help us transcribe this deed and shed light on the stories of not just the institution of slavery, but the individual men, women, and children who helped shape America.

Go

100% Complete

4 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

Deed of sale for an enslaved man named Cane

The history of enslaved persons is often difficult to uncover. Printed material provides us with clues about individuals and their history. This deed records the sale of an enslaved man named Cane by Charnell H. Durham to Benjamin F. Jenkins, both of De Soto Parish, Louisiana, on February 10, 1859. The sale was witnessed and recorded by the notary Samuel F. Smith, who kept this document for recording purposes. Help us transcribe this deed and shed light on the stories of not just the institution of slavery, but the individual men, women, and children who helped shape America.

Go

100% Complete

2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Printed lyrics for the Song of the First of Arkansas

This paper contains printed lyrics for "Song of the First of Arkansas." The song is set to the tune of the Methodist hymn "Say, Brothers, Will You Meet Us." The lyrics were printed by the Supervisory Committee for Recruiting Colored Regiments in 1864. The Committee, located in Philadelphia, PA, was established to recruit African Americans into the military during the Civil War. The song was written by Captain Lindley Miller who enlisted in the New York State Militia during the Civil War and served as a captain in the First Arkansas Colored Infantry Regiment (later known as the 46th United States Colored Infantry Regiment). The song was printed in the February 27, 1864 issue of the National Anti-Slavery Standard. Help us transcribe these song lyrics created for the First Arkansas troops.

Go

100% Complete

29 Total Pages 76 Contributing Members

Playbill for 'Master Harold' …and the boys (2)

One of the time-honored traditions of the theater is the playbill. From local community theaters to Broadway, playbills provide the audience with information about the story being told on stage and the artists who bring it to life. After the show, playbills often become cherished souvenirs. "Playbill," a monthly magazine distributed at major theaters in New York and nationwide, presents details about particular productions along with articles about current happenings in the theater world. The Museum's collection of playbills, which spans from the nineteenth century to the present, offers insight into the roles African Americans have played in the development of American theater as actors, playwrights, directors, producers, costume designers, choreographers, and more. Help us transcribe this Playbill to discover and share the history of African Americans taking the stage.

Go

100% Complete

21 Total Pages 41 Contributing Members

Playbill for All Over Town

One of the time-honored traditions of the theater is the playbill. From local community theaters to Broadway, playbills provide the audience with information about the story being told on stage and the artists who bring it to life. After the show, playbills often become cherished souvenirs. "Playbill," a monthly magazine distributed at major theaters in New York and nationwide, presents details about particular productions along with articles about current happenings in the theater world. The Museum's collection of playbills, which spans from the nineteenth century to the present, offers insight into the roles African Americans have played in the development of American theater as actors, playwrights, directors, producers, costume designers, choreographers, and more. Help us transcribe this Playbill to discover and share the history of African Americans taking the stage.

Go

100% Complete

39 Total Pages 48 Contributing Members

Playbill for Having Our Say

One of the time-honored traditions of the theater is the playbill. From local community theaters to Broadway, playbills provide the audience with information about the story being told on stage and the artists who bring it to life. After the show, playbills often become cherished souvenirs. "Playbill," a monthly magazine distributed at major theaters in New York and nationwide, presents details about particular productions along with articles about current happenings in the theater world. The Museum's collection of playbills, which spans from the nineteenth century to the present, offers insight into the roles African Americans have played in the development of American theater as actors, playwrights, directors, producers, costume designers, choreographers, and more. Help us transcribe this Playbill from Porgy and Bess to discover and share the history of African Americans taking the stage.

Go

100% Complete

41 Total Pages 43 Contributing Members

Playbill for Joe Turner’s Come and Gone

One of the time-honored traditions of the theater is the playbill. From local community theaters to Broadway, playbills provide the audience with information about the story being told on stage and the artists who bring it to life. After the show, playbills often become cherished souvenirs. "Playbill," a monthly magazine distributed at major theaters in New York and nationwide, presents details about particular productions along with articles about current happenings in the theater world. The Museum's collection of playbills, which spans from the nineteenth century to the present, offers insight into the roles African Americans have played in the development of American theater as actors, playwrights, directors, producers, costume designers, choreographers, and more. Help us transcribe this Playbill from Porgy and Bess to discover and share the history of African Americans taking the stage.

Go

Pages