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33 Total Pages 53 Contributing Members

Playbill for Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom

One of the time-honored traditions of the theater is the playbill. From local community theaters to Broadway, playbills provide the audience with information about the story being told on stage and the artists who bring it to life. After the show, playbills often become cherished souvenirs. "Playbill," a monthly magazine distributed at major theaters in New York and nationwide, presents details about particular productions along with articles about current happenings in the theater world. The Museum's collection of playbills, which spans from the nineteenth century to the present, offers insight into the roles African Americans have played in the development of American theater as actors, playwrights, directors, producers, costume designers, choreographers, and more. Help us transcribe this Playbill from Ma Rainey's Black Bottom to discover and share the history of African Americans taking the stage.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Lobby Card for The Flying Ace

During the segregation era, an independent industry dedicated to the production of “race movies” for African American audiences emerged in response to the exclusion of black artists from Hollywood and to counter the negative, stereotypical representations of African Americans in mainstream movies. Help us transcribe this lobby card for the 1926 film "The Flying Ace" to learn more about films produced for black audiences in the era.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Lobby card for The Bronze Venus

During the segregation era, an independent industry dedicated to the production of “race movies” for African American audiences emerged in response to the exclusion of black artists from Hollywood and to counter the negative, stereotypical representations of African Americans in mainstream movies. Help us transcribe this lobby card for the 1943 film "The Bronze Venus" to learn more about films produced for black audiences in the era.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Poster for Ebony Parade

During the segregation era, an independent industry dedicated to the production of “race movies” for African American audiences emerged in response to the exclusion of black artists from Hollywood and to counter the negative, stereotypical representations of African Americans in mainstream movies. Help us transcribe this poster for the 1947 film "Ebony Parade" to learn more about films produced for black audiences in the era.

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2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Poster for The Crimson Skull

During the segregation era, an independent industry dedicated to the production of “race movies” for African American audiences emerged in response to the exclusion of black artists from Hollywood and to counter the negative, stereotypical representations of African Americans in mainstream movies. Help us transcribe this poster for the 1922 film "The Crimson Skull" to learn more about films produced for black audiences in the era.

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2 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Poster for Am I Guilty?

During the segregation era, an independent industry dedicated to the production of “race movies” for African American audiences emerged in response to the exclusion of black artists from Hollywood and to counter the negative, stereotypical representations of African Americans in mainstream movies. Help us transcribe this poster for the 1940 film "Am I Guilty?" to learn more about films produced for black audiences in that era.

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23 Total Pages 37 Contributing Members

National Sports Vol. VII No. 7

Althea Gibson was one of the most formidable sportswomen of the mid-20th century. She was the number-one-ranked female tennis player in the world in 1957 and 1958, a two-time Wimbledon ladies singles champion, two-time U.S. Open ladies singles champion, winner of multiple doubles and mixed doubles tournaments, and a professional golfer. Gibson took to tennis as a teen and despite her skill was often prohibited from playing in elite tournaments because of her race. In 1950, lobbying by the American Tennis Association and former tennis player Alice Marble forced the U.S. Tennis Association’s hand and Gibson became the first African American to compete in the U.S. Nationals. Help us transcribe this issue of India’s National Sports Magazine to learn about how the world covered Gibson’s accomplishments.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Poster for The Devil's Daughter

During the segregation era, an independent industry dedicated to the production of “race movies” for African American audiences emerged in response to the exclusion of black artists from Hollywood and to counter the negative, stereotypical representations of African Americans in mainstream movies. Help us transcribe this poster for the 1939 film "The Devil's Daughter" to learn more about films produced for black audiences in the 1930s.

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121 Total Pages 247 Contributing Members

Slavery and Freedom

Have you ever wondered what goes into the making of an exhibition? Here is your chance to contribute to Slavery and Freedom, one of the inaugural exhibitions of the Smithsonian’s newest museum, that National Museum of African American History and Culture. The Slavery and Freedom exhibition explores the founding of the nation through the lens of the African American experience from the development of the Atlantic world in the 15th century up through the Reconstruction Acts following the Civil War. Please join us in transcribing these documents to help uncover the stories of enslaved persons and their resilience, resistance, courage and faith.

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148 Total Pages 198 Contributing Members

Diary of Frances Anne Rollin, 1868

This 1868 personal diary of Frances Anne Rollin is one of the earliest known diaries written by a southern black woman. Rollin was a nineteenth century suffragette, author, and teacher. Her diary covers the publication of her biography of Martin R. Delany, her courtship and first year of marriage to William J. Whipper, and life during Reconstruction in Columbia, South Carolina. Help us transcribe this diary and learn more about the life of this Reconstruction-era activist, teacher, and author.

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