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Norma Merrick Sklarek Archive, Series 1: Eulogy to Walter Ernest Merrick a devoted member Of The Karma Club...

Norma Merrick Sklarek (1926–2012) was a renowned architect and a woman of firsts who broke racial and gender barriers earning her place in the male-dominated world of architecture. Sklarek was the first African American woman licensed to practice architecture in New York and California and the first Black woman member and fellow of the American Institute of Architects. Sklarek worked for numerous architectural firms and in 1985 she founded her own women-led business, Siegel, Sklarek, and Diamond, the first of its kind. She led large scale projects including the Fox Plaza, World Finance Center, United States Embassy in Tokyo, Japan, The Mall of America, and Terminal One at Los Angeles International Airport. The Sklarek archival collection offers an in-depth view of Sklarek’s life and career, including family records, resumes, business ephemera, photographs, correspondence, publications, clippings, architectural drawings, and awards. Help us transcribe this collection that highlights the prestigious career of Norma Merrick Sklarek and discover how she paved the way for future women and African American architects.

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2 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Norma Merrick Sklarek Archive, Series 1: Proclamation from State of New York proclaiming April 20-26 as Caribbean-American...

Norma Merrick Sklarek (1926–2012) was a renowned architect and a woman of firsts who broke racial and gender barriers earning her place in the male-dominated world of architecture. Sklarek was the first African American woman licensed to practice architecture in New York and California and the first Black woman member and fellow of the American Institute of Architects. Sklarek worked for numerous architectural firms and in 1985 she founded her own women-led business, Siegel, Sklarek, and Diamond, the first of its kind. She led large scale projects including the Fox Plaza, World Finance Center, United States Embassy in Tokyo, Japan, The Mall of America, and Terminal One at Los Angeles International Airport. The Sklarek archival collection offers an in-depth view of Sklarek’s life and career, including family records, resumes, business ephemera, photographs, correspondence, publications, clippings, architectural drawings, and awards. Help us transcribe this collection that highlights the prestigious career of Norma Merrick Sklarek and discover how she paved the way for future women and African American architects.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Norma Merrick Sklarek Archive, Series 1: The Christian Courier "Gold Medalist"

Norma Merrick Sklarek (1926–2012) was a renowned architect and a woman of firsts who broke racial and gender barriers earning her place in the male-dominated world of architecture. Sklarek was the first African American woman licensed to practice architecture in New York and California and the first Black woman member and fellow of the American Institute of Architects. Sklarek worked for numerous architectural firms and in 1985 she founded her own women-led business, Siegel, Sklarek, and Diamond, the first of its kind. She led large scale projects including the Fox Plaza, World Finance Center, United States Embassy in Tokyo, Japan, The Mall of America, and Terminal One at Los Angeles International Airport. The Sklarek archival collection offers an in-depth view of Sklarek’s life and career, including family records, resumes, business ephemera, photographs, correspondence, publications, clippings, architectural drawings, and awards. Help us transcribe this collection that highlights the prestigious career of Norma Merrick Sklarek and discover how she paved the way for future women and African American architects.

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Norma Merrick Sklarek Archive, Series 3: Drawing, Multipurpose Building Commonwealth Avenue Elementary School Siegel Sklarek...

Norma Merrick Sklarek (1926–2012) was a renowned architect and a woman of firsts who broke racial and gender barriers earning her place in the male-dominated world of architecture. Sklarek was the first African American woman licensed to practice architecture in New York and California and the first Black woman member and fellow of the American Institute of Architects. Sklarek worked for numerous architectural firms and in 1985 she founded her own women-led business, Siegel, Sklarek, and Diamond, the first of its kind. She led large scale projects including the Fox Plaza, World Finance Center, United States Embassy in Tokyo, Japan, The Mall of America, and Terminal One at Los Angeles International Airport. The Sklarek archival collection offers an in-depth view of Sklarek’s life and career, including family records, resumes, business ephemera, photographs, correspondence, publications, clippings, architectural drawings, and awards. Help us transcribe this collection that highlights the prestigious career of Norma Merrick Sklarek and discover how she paved the way for future women and African American architects.

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2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Norma Merrick Sklarek Archive, Series 3: Drawing, Marva Collins Preparatory School, Compton, CA

Norma Merrick Sklarek (1926–2012) was a renowned architect and a woman of firsts who broke racial and gender barriers earning her place in the male-dominated world of architecture. Sklarek was the first African American woman licensed to practice architecture in New York and California and the first Black woman member and fellow of the American Institute of Architects. Sklarek worked for numerous architectural firms and in 1985 she founded her own women-led business, Siegel, Sklarek, and Diamond, the first of its kind. She led large scale projects including the Fox Plaza, World Finance Center, United States Embassy in Tokyo, Japan, The Mall of America, and Terminal One at Los Angeles International Airport. The Sklarek archival collection offers an in-depth view of Sklarek’s life and career, including family records, resumes, business ephemera, photographs, correspondence, publications, clippings, architectural drawings, and awards. Help us transcribe this collection that highlights the prestigious career of Norma Merrick Sklarek and discover how she paved the way for future women and African American architects.

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100% Complete

2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Norma Merrick Sklarek Archive, Series 1: Letter to Dr. Walter Merrick from Averell Harriman Governor of New York

Norma Merrick Sklarek (1926–2012) was a renowned architect and a woman of firsts who broke racial and gender barriers earning her place in the male-dominated world of architecture. Sklarek was the first African American woman licensed to practice architecture in New York and California and the first Black woman member and fellow of the American Institute of Architects. Sklarek worked for numerous architectural firms and in 1985 she founded her own women-led business, Siegel, Sklarek, and Diamond, the first of its kind. She led large scale projects including the Fox Plaza, World Finance Center, United States Embassy in Tokyo, Japan, The Mall of America, and Terminal One at Los Angeles International Airport. The Sklarek archival collection offers an in-depth view of Sklarek’s life and career, including family records, resumes, business ephemera, photographs, correspondence, publications, clippings, architectural drawings, and awards. Help us transcribe this collection that highlights the prestigious career of Norma Merrick Sklarek and discover how she paved the way for future women and African American architects.

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2 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

Letter Signed by Frederick Douglass on Freedmen's Savings Bank letterhead

Reconstruction—the period following the Civil War—was a revolutionary political, social, and economic movement that reshaped the United States in profound and lasting ways. It manifested the aspirations and determinations of African Americans, including four million newly freed people, seeking to define themselves as free and equal citizens. The Reconstruction era also exposed deep divisions and clashing visions among Americans about how to rebuild the nation after the end of slavery, compelling Americans to reckon with fundamental questions such as: What is the meaning of freedom and equality? What does it mean to be an American? Who is entitled to the full rights of citizenship? Help us transcribe these records to better understand how newly freed African Americans embraced freedom by establishing families, creating communities, and building new institutions, while fighting against the efforts of white supremacists who rejected—some violently—the idea of equal rights for African Americans.

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8 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

Civil Rights Speech of Hon. Alonzo J. Ransier, of South Carolina, in The House of Representatives, February 7, 1874

Reconstruction—the period following the Civil War—was a revolutionary political, social, and economic movement that reshaped the United States in profound and lasting ways. It manifested the aspirations and determinations of African Americans, including four million newly freed people, seeking to define themselves as free and equal citizens. The Reconstruction era also exposed deep divisions and clashing visions among Americans about how to rebuild the nation after the end of slavery, compelling Americans to reckon with fundamental questions such as: What is the meaning of freedom and equality? What does it mean to be an American? Who is entitled to the full rights of citizenship? Help us transcribe these records to better understand how newly freed African Americans embraced freedom by establishing families, creating communities, and building new institutions, while fighting against the efforts of white supremacists who rejected—some violently—the idea of equal rights for African Americans.

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2 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

Letter written by Union soldier John Stagenwalt recounting New Orleans Massacre

Reconstruction—the period following the Civil War—was a revolutionary political, social, and economic movement that reshaped the United States in profound and lasting ways. It manifested the aspirations and determinations of African Americans, including four million newly freed people, seeking to define themselves as free and equal citizens. The Reconstruction era also exposed deep divisions and clashing visions among Americans about how to rebuild the nation after the end of slavery, compelling Americans to reckon with fundamental questions such as: What is the meaning of freedom and equality? What does it mean to be an American? Who is entitled to the full rights of citizenship? Help us transcribe these records to better understand how newly freed African Americans embraced freedom by establishing families, creating communities, and building new institutions, while fighting against the efforts of white supremacists who rejected—some violently—the idea of equal rights for African Americans.

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3 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Letter written by Union occupation soldier John Stagenwalt, July 1866

Reconstruction—the period following the Civil War—was a revolutionary political, social, and economic movement that reshaped the United States in profound and lasting ways. It manifested the aspirations and determinations of African Americans, including four million newly freed people, seeking to define themselves as free and equal citizens. The Reconstruction era also exposed deep divisions and clashing visions among Americans about how to rebuild the nation after the end of slavery, compelling Americans to reckon with fundamental questions such as: What is the meaning of freedom and equality? What does it mean to be an American? Who is entitled to the full rights of citizenship? Help us transcribe these records to better understand how newly freed African Americans embraced freedom by establishing families, creating communities, and building new institutions, while fighting against the efforts of white supremacists who rejected—some violently—the idea of equal rights for African Americans.

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