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Colored Veterans of the 15th Regt. 369th Infantry, Marching up Fifth Avenue. New York City

The stereograph was the original virtual reality photograph. The two images, shown from two slightly different perspectives, take on a three-dimensional appearance when looking through a specially designed viewer called a stereoscope. Invented in 1838, the stereograph remained popular for over one hundred years, allowing viewers access to a wide variety of places that could not be seen in person. This includes the scene shown here, titled, V19244 Colored Veterans of the 15th Regt. 369th Infantry, Marching up Fifth Avenue. New York City. Help us transcribe this stereograph and learn more about the infamous “Harlem Hell Fighters” and their role in World War I.

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178 Total Pages 0 Contributing Members

Madam C. J. Walker Collection

Madam C. J. Walker (December 23, 1867 - May 25, 1919), born Sarah Breedlove, was an African American entrepreneur, educator, and philanthropist. She overcame poverty and other hardships to become a self-made millionaire. Her company, the Madam C.J. Walker Manufacturing Company, manufactured, distributed, and sold hair care and beauty products, including skin care items, body powders, lipstick, and perfumes developed for African Americans. Help us transcribe information about historic artifacts related to Walker and her work to uncover the fascinating history of Madam C.J. Walker, her company, and black beauty culture in early twentieth century America

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26 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

The Crisis Soldier's issue

The Crisis is the official magazine of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Founded by W. E. B. Du Bois (editor), Oswald Garrison Villard, J. Max Barber, Charles Edward Russell, Kelly Miller, W. S. Braithwaite, and Mary Dunlop Maclean, The Crisis has been in continuous print since 1910, making it the oldest African American-led publication in the world. The June 1918 “Soldier’s Issue” focuses on African Americans fighting in World War I. Help us transcribe the ads, articles, and images in The Crisis and learn about the experiences of African American soldiers, the opinions of African American thought leaders, and the effects on African American lives during World War I.

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49 Total Pages 53 Contributing Members

Abbott's Monthly Vol. II No. 1

From October 1929 to September 1933, "Abbott’s Monthly" successfully engaged readers with a cosmopolitan feel that featured unknown contemporary authors who addressed African American news while also writing fiction pieces. The publication was founded by Robert Sengstacke Abbott, founder and owner of the already popular "Chicago Defender," the most popular African American newspaper in the country at the time. The first edition of "Abbott's Monthly" sold nearly 50,000 copies and shortly thereafter soared to 100,000. However, the magazine in it's original form ceased publication in 1933 due to the Great Depression, but continued to be publish under a new name "Abbott’s Monthly Illustrated News," until 1934. Help us transcribe this Abbott’s Monthly to explore the culture of the 1930s.

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13 Total Pages 13 Contributing Members

Promotional and Souvenir Program autographed by Marian Anderson

Marian Anderson was not only a world famous mezzo-soprano and symbol of justice. Learn more about Anderson's family life and philanthropy by transcribing a program for one of her performances that includes an article about Anderson's relationship with her mother and information about her career and scholarship awards.

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53 Total Pages 13 Contributing Members

Poro College Collection

These rare materials representing Annie T. Malone's Poro Beauty Care Business help document the work of Annie Malone, leading beauty culturalist, philanthropist, and entrepreneur during the early 20th century. The materials were owned by Lucille Brown, a 1915 graduate of Annie Malone's Poro College.

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1 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Song sheet for Voulez-vous de la Canne à Sucre? performed by Josephine Baker

"Voulez-vous de la Canne à Sucre?," which translates to “Do You Want Sugarcane?,” was performed by Josephine Baker in the 1930s. The 1930 piece was written by Léo Lelièvre and Henri Varna with music by Paddy. Entirely in French, the song was first performed in the Casino de Paris. Help us transcribe the cover of this song sheet to discover the music of the 1930s.

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20 Total Pages 22 Contributing Members

Flash Weekly Newspicture Magazine, May 3, 1938

"Flash" was a weekly newspicture magazine published in Washington, D.C., from June 1937-August 1939. "Flash" was one of a number of periodicals aimed at black audiences during the 1930s that featured images and text about African Americans and African American life during this period. In a 1938 editorial titled "New Year Forecast" the editors wrote, "No longer an experiment, it ["Flash"] will represent the outstanding dynamic and satisfying weekly presentation of the significant drama of American life, with colored men and women in the title roles." This May 3, 1938 issue of "Flash" features photographs by acclaimed Pittsburgh photographer Charles "Teenie" Harris. Help us transcribe this issue of "Flash" to learn more about African American life in the 1930s and see if you can find Teenie Harris' photos throughout.

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3 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Letter to Naomi Long from Reverend S.S. Jones regarding Clarence Long

Here is a handwritten letter to Naomi Long from Reverend S.S. Jones. In it, Jones praises Long on a poem she wrote to her father, Clarence Long. Reverend Jones was a Baptist minister, businessman, and amateur filmmaker. Jones was born in Tennessee to former slaves and grew up in the South before moving to Oklahoma in 1889. He became an influential Baptist minister, building and pastoring fifteen churches. Jones was a circuit preacher assigned by the National Baptist Convention to document the glories of Oklahoma's black towns of Guthrie, Muskogee, and Langston

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2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Pinback button supporting the Scottsboro Boys

Pinback buttons are a statement that lets others know your opinions and feelings on a variety of topics. This button shows support for the Scottsboro Boys. On March 25, 1931, nine African American teenage boys were accused of raping two white women. The case was first heard in Scottsboro, Alabama, in three rushed trials, where the defendants received poor legal representation. All but one of the defendants were convicted of rape and sentenced to death. The International Labor Defense (ILD), the legal arm of the Communist Party USA, took on this case realizing that the fame of the case would spotlight the blatant racism shown against the Scottsboro Boys. The ILD directed a national campaign to help free the teenagers that included rallies, speeches, parades, and demonstrations. The Alabama Supreme Court ruled in favor of the guilty verdict for seven of the eight convictions. The ruling was appealed to the United States Supreme Court in the case Powell v. Alabama Chief Justice John C. Anderson. The Supreme Court ruling decided that the defendants had been denied an impartial jury, fair trial, fair sentencing, and effective counsel, which violated their rights under the Fourteenth Amendment. This ruling was one of the first examples showing that African Americans were denied the rights of a fair impartial trial. The ruling was upheld again in Norris v. Alabama.

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