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2 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) records – Santa Fe, NM: Treaty of Peace, Friendships and Mutual Assistance, 1947

Help us transcribe “Santa Fe, NM: Treaty of Peace, Friendships and Mutual Assistance, 1947” (Box 2, Folder 1) from the Records of the National Congress of American Indians. These documents can be found in Series 1: Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences of the NCAI records. NCAI was established in 1944 when close to 80 delegates from 50 tribes and associations in 27 states came together in Denver, Colorado to establish the National Congress of American Indians at the Constitutional Convention. Founded in response to the emerging threat of termination, the founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights. The Founders also committed to the betterment of the quality of life of Native people. To this day, protecting these inherent and legal rights remains the primary focus of NCAI.

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10 Total Pages 15 Contributing Members

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) records – St. Paul, MN: Convention Bids for 1952 Convention, 1951

Help us transcribe “St. Paul, MN: Convention Bids for 1952 Convention, 1951” (Box 3, Folder 7) from the Records of the National Congress of American Indians. These documents can be found in Series 1: Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences of the NCAI records. NCAI was established in 1944 when close to 80 delegates from 50 tribes and associations in 27 states came together in Denver, Colorado to establish the National Congress of American Indians at the Constitutional Convention. Founded in response to the emerging threat of termination, the founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights. The Founders also committed to the betterment of the quality of life of Native people. To this day, protecting these inherent and legal rights remains the primary focus of NCAI.

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65 Total Pages 38 Contributing Members

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) records – St. Paul, MN: Correspondence, 1951

Help us transcribe “St. Paul, MN: Correspondence, 1951” (Box 3, Folder 4) from the Records of the National Congress of American Indians. These documents can be found in Series 1: Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences of the NCAI records. NCAI was established in 1944 when close to 80 delegates from 50 tribes and associations in 27 states came together in Denver, Colorado to establish the National Congress of American Indians at the Constitutional Convention. Founded in response to the emerging threat of termination, the founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights. The Founders also committed to the betterment of the quality of life of Native people. To this day, protecting these inherent and legal rights remains the primary focus of NCAI.

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88 Total Pages 64 Contributing Members

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) records – St. Paul, MN: General Material, 1951

Help us transcribe “St. Paul, MN: General Material, 1951” (Box 3, Folder 3) from the Records of the National Congress of American Indians. These documents can be found in Series 1: Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences of the NCAI records. NCAI was established in 1944 when close to 80 delegates from 50 tribes and associations in 27 states came together in Denver, Colorado to establish the National Congress of American Indians at the Constitutional Convention. Founded in response to the emerging threat of termination, the founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights. The Founders also committed to the betterment of the quality of life of Native people. To this day, protecting these inherent and legal rights remains the primary focus of NCAI.

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116 Total Pages 88 Contributing Members

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) records – St. Paul, MN: Proceedings, 1951

Help us transcribe “St. Paul, MN: Proceedings, 1951” (Box 3, Folder 5) from the Records of the National Congress of American Indians. These documents can be found in Series 1: Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences of the NCAI records. NCAI was established in 1944 when close to 80 delegates from 50 tribes and associations in 27 states came together in Denver, Colorado to establish the National Congress of American Indians at the Constitutional Convention. Founded in response to the emerging threat of termination, the founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights. The Founders also committed to the betterment of the quality of life of Native people. To this day, protecting these inherent and legal rights remains the primary focus of NCAI.

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38 Total Pages 41 Contributing Members

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) records – St. Paul, MN: Resolutions, 1951

Help us transcribe “St. Paul, MN: Resolutions, 1951” (Box 3, Folder 9) from the Records of the National Congress of American Indians. These documents can be found in Series 1: Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences of the NCAI records. NCAI was established in 1944 when close to 80 delegates from 50 tribes and associations in 27 states came together in Denver, Colorado to establish the National Congress of American Indians at the Constitutional Convention. Founded in response to the emerging threat of termination, the founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights. The Founders also committed to the betterment of the quality of life of Native people. To this day, protecting these inherent and legal rights remains the primary focus of NCAI.

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65 Total Pages 39 Contributing Members

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) records – St. Paul, MN: Speeches, 1951

Help us transcribe “St. Paul, MN: Speeches, 1951” (Box 3, Folder 8) from the Records of the National Congress of American Indians. These documents can be found in Series 1: Conventions and Mid-Year Conferences of the NCAI records. NCAI was established in 1944 when close to 80 delegates from 50 tribes and associations in 27 states came together in Denver, Colorado to establish the National Congress of American Indians at the Constitutional Convention. Founded in response to the emerging threat of termination, the founding members stressed the need for unity and cooperation among tribal governments and people for the security and protection of treaty and sovereign rights. The Founders also committed to the betterment of the quality of life of Native people. To this day, protecting these inherent and legal rights remains the primary focus of NCAI.

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50 Total Pages 31 Contributing Members

Peratrovich family papers – Biographical information, awards, and photographs, 1929-1987

Help us transcribe “Biographical information, awards, and photocopies of photographs, 1929-1987” (Box 1, Folder 1) from the Peratrovich Family papers. The Peratrovich family papers include correspondence, personal papers, and news clippings related to civil rights work done by Elizabeth and Roy Peratrovich, Sr. in Alaska circa 1940-1960. Elizabeth Wanamaker Peratrovich (1911-1958) and her husband Roy Peratrovich, Sr. (1908-1989), both members of the Tlingit Nation, were prominent civil rights activists in Alaska. They worked on behalf of Alaska Natives, advocating for equality of all citizens, regardless of race. Both were influential in this work, with Elizabeth being credited with the passage of the 1945 Anti-Discrimination Act, and later honored posthumously by the Alaska Legislature when February 16 was established as Elizabeth Peratrovich Day. Both Elizabeth and Roy additionally served as leaders of the Alaska Native Sisterhood and Alaska Native Brotherhood, promoting Native rights and culture. After Elizabeth's death in 1958, Roy continued his and his wife's advocacy for Alaska Natives, as he worked with the Bureau of Indian Affairs for 38 years, eventually becoming superintendent of the BIA office in Anchorage.

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122 Total Pages 77 Contributing Members

Peratrovich family papers – Correspondence, papers, news clippings, 1939-1958

Help us transcribe “Correspondence, papers, news clippings, 1939-1958” (Box 1, Folder 2) from the Peratrovich Family papers. The Peratrovich family papers include correspondence, personal papers, and news clippings related to civil rights work done by Elizabeth and Roy Peratrovich, Sr. in Alaska circa 1940-1960. Elizabeth Wanamaker Peratrovich (1911-1958) and her husband Roy Peratrovich, Sr. (1908-1989), both members of the Tlingit Nation, were prominent civil rights activists in Alaska. They worked on behalf of Alaska Natives, advocating for equality of all citizens, regardless of race. Both were influential in this work, with Elizabeth being credited with the passage of the 1945 Anti-Discrimination Act, and later honored posthumously by the Alaska Legislature when February 16 was established as Elizabeth Peratrovich Day. Both Elizabeth and Roy additionally served as leaders of the Alaska Native Sisterhood and Alaska Native Brotherhood, promoting Native rights and culture. After Elizabeth's death in 1958, Roy continued his and his wife's advocacy for Alaska Natives, as he worked with the Bureau of Indian Affairs for 38 years, eventually becoming superintendent of the BIA office in Anchorage.

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168 Total Pages 62 Contributing Members

Peratrovich family papers – Correspondence, papers, news clippings, 1958-1988

Help us transcribe “Correspondence, papers, news clippings, 1958-1988” (Box 1, Folder 3) from the Peratrovich Family papers. The Peratrovich family papers include correspondence, personal papers, and news clippings related to civil rights work done by Elizabeth and Roy Peratrovich, Sr. in Alaska circa 1940-1960. Elizabeth Wanamaker Peratrovich (1911-1958) and her husband Roy Peratrovich, Sr. (1908-1989), both members of the Tlingit Nation, were prominent civil rights activists in Alaska. They worked on behalf of Alaska Natives, advocating for equality of all citizens, regardless of race. Both were influential in this work, with Elizabeth being credited with the passage of the 1945 Anti-Discrimination Act, and later honored posthumously by the Alaska Legislature when February 16 was established as Elizabeth Peratrovich Day. Both Elizabeth and Roy additionally served as leaders of the Alaska Native Sisterhood and Alaska Native Brotherhood, promoting Native rights and culture. After Elizabeth's death in 1958, Roy continued his and his wife's advocacy for Alaska Natives, as he worked with the Bureau of Indian Affairs for 38 years, eventually becoming superintendent of the BIA office in Anchorage.

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